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By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

When Harmony Korine Met Die Antwoord

Umshini Wam, a 16-minute short directed by Harmony Korine (Gummo, Mister Lonely), starring South African musical group Die Antwoord‘s Ninja and Yo Landi Vi$$er (whose look was rumored an influence on Lisbeth Salander in Fincher’s Girl With The Dragon Tattoo) and shot by Alexis Zabé (Fernando Eimbcke’s Lake Tahoe and Duck Season; Carlos Reygada’s rapturous Silent Light and his forthcoming Post Tenebras Lux), debuts at SXSW. Synopsis: “Big dreams, big blunts, big rims, and big guns. its time to get gangsta gangsta. Ninja and Yo Landi are wheelchair-bound lovers and real gangstas. They live in the outskirts of civilization, they shoot guns for fun, smoke massive joints, and sleep in the woods. They don’t have any bling to show for their gangsta cred, but the world deserves to know who they are. They’re tramps, and their wheels are starting to fall off. Ninja become despondent over their vagabond existence, but Yo Landi won’t let him give up.  what ensues is straight up gangsta mayhem, the realist of the real, true gangsta shit.” No word if the “gangsta shit” goes down in the same Nashville back alleys as Trash HumpersAgnès b. co-produces. [H/t @trentone.]

One Response to “When Harmony Korine Met Die Antwoord”

  1. Gabriel says:

    that was deep, I may need to bring a box of kleenex to the movie…

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A statement from David Chase’s representative, Leslee Dart:

A journalist for Vox misconstrued what David Chase said in their interview. To simply quote David as saying,“ Tony Soprano is not dead,” is inaccurate. There is a much larger context for that statement and as such, it is not true. As David Chase has said numerous times on the record, “Whether Tony Soprano is alive or dead is not the point.” To continue to search for this answer is fruitless. The final scene of THE SOPRANOS raises a spiritual question that has no right or wrong answer.
~ David Chase Refutes Vox Writer

“By the time the sounds of the Von Trapp children warbling ‘Silent Night’ drift through The Giver, you may find yourself wondering what fresh movie hell this is. In truth, the enervating hash of dystopian dread, vague religiosity and commercial advertising-style uplift is nothing if not stale. Adapted from Lois Lowry’s book for young readers, the story involves an isolated society that, with its cubistic dwellings, mindless smiles, monochromatic environs and nebulous communitarianism, seem modeled on a Scandinavian country or an old Mentos commercial.”
~ Manohla Dargis’ Deadly Lede For Review Of The Giver