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Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

When Harmony Korine Met Die Antwoord

Umshini Wam, a 16-minute short directed by Harmony Korine (Gummo, Mister Lonely), starring South African musical group Die Antwoord‘s Ninja and Yo Landi Vi$$er (whose look was rumored an influence on Lisbeth Salander in Fincher’s Girl With The Dragon Tattoo) and shot by Alexis Zabé (Fernando Eimbcke’s Lake Tahoe and Duck Season; Carlos Reygada’s rapturous Silent Light and his forthcoming Post Tenebras Lux), debuts at SXSW. Synopsis: “Big dreams, big blunts, big rims, and big guns. its time to get gangsta gangsta. Ninja and Yo Landi are wheelchair-bound lovers and real gangstas. They live in the outskirts of civilization, they shoot guns for fun, smoke massive joints, and sleep in the woods. They don’t have any bling to show for their gangsta cred, but the world deserves to know who they are. They’re tramps, and their wheels are starting to fall off. Ninja become despondent over their vagabond existence, but Yo Landi won’t let him give up.  what ensues is straight up gangsta mayhem, the realist of the real, true gangsta shit.” No word if the “gangsta shit” goes down in the same Nashville back alleys as Trash HumpersAgnès b. co-produces. [H/t @trentone.]

One Response to “When Harmony Korine Met Die Antwoord”

  1. Gabriel says:

    that was deep, I may need to bring a box of kleenex to the movie…

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