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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

The Film Delivelution: 30811

Universal First Studio to Make All Movie Clips Available Online

Missing from this Hollywood Reporter headline? “Intentionally.”

Because, as we all know, the most popular moments from many, many movies are on YouTube already. But those are not fully controlled or monetized by the studios. This announcement with AnyClip.com is another step towards studios being much more aggressive about controlling their own content.

AnyClip’s service, which seems great at first – until you look real close – is interesting conceptually. There are still very limited clips. For instance, they have Fast Times At Ridgemont High, but no Spicoli and the Phoebe Cates/Judge Reinhold bathing suit scene is listed, but is not available when you click on it. Ratings issues may be an unspoken issue. And the embed option is not currently available on any clip… and that is, really, what will make the whole thing work. It’s not looking through clips that is fun. It’s the ability to contextualize with them.

9 Responses to “The Film Delivelution: 30811”

  1. yancyskancy says:

    I’ve been trying to think of a circumstance in which I would find this AnyClip service useful. I got nothin’. Maybe if I’m writing a paper or essay and want to refresh my memory of certain moments without pulling out a DVD? Or I’m sitting around with friends and need to settle a bet about a particular moment or line of dialogue? Whatever. I don’t get it.

  2. Oddvark says:

    How is this different than http://movieclips.com/ which has way more clips (from a bunch of different major studios, including Universal)?

  3. David Poland says:

    seems to be the same thing.

    Interestingly, different clips from Fast Times.

    Will look into it.

  4. LexG says:

    Phoebe Cates was OK but that scene was always overrated. JJL has much better nudity in the movie and I prefer white girls to Vaguely Asian (TM SNL), even if the only thing I’ve ever been able to pull in my adult life is Asian Pussy because White Men In L.A. can’t get White Women.

  5. yancyskancy says:

    I just like how that’s the first scene Dave goes looking for on these sites. :)

  6. Proman says:

    Yeah, Lex. THAT’s your problem. Keep saying that to yourself.

  7. cadavra says:

    Seriously, Lex, what part of Burbank are you in? I’m there frequently and there are plenty of WW walking around.

  8. LexG says:

    Yeah, old horse-crone types.

  9. cadavra says:

    Sigh…

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