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Kim Voynar

By Kim Voynar Voynar@moviecitynews.com

Juno Temple Joins The Dark Knight Rises. Cool.

Here’s some casting news in which I’m particularly interested: Variety is EXCLUUUUUSIVELY reporting that indie starlet Juno Temple is locked to join the cast of Christopher Nolan’s The Dark Knight Rises. The pot had already been sweetened by the addition Joseph Gordon-Levitt to the mix, but Juno Temple being cast as well is great news.

Rumors are flying fast and furious as everyone gets into some heavy petting in their excitement about this film. Is Temple being cast as a Robin-like character? whispers Ain’t It Cool News. Nah, more likely as Holly Robinson, asserts Spinoff Online.

Meanwhile, Variety reports JGL has been cast as Alberto Falcone (The Holiday Killer), while EW calls bullshit.

As for Temple, she was great in Dirty Girl and KABOOM!, and I’ve been interested in seeing what path she’d take. I don’t think there’s a universe where agreeing to star in a Chris Nolan film is a bad move career-wise, with the caveat that I hope she’ll use that leverage to keep making smart choices and stay the hell away from lame rom-coms.

One Response to “Juno Temple Joins The Dark Knight Rises. Cool.”

  1. Yes! The cast of “The Dark Knight Rises” grows interesting with every new anoucement. Hope Nolan doesn’t lose narrative focus with so many characters. Love the way Nolan uses former character actors in all his movies; Hathaway seems like an odd choice here.

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DENNIS COOPER

The next thing that really changed my world and thoroughly influenced my writing were the films of Robert Bresson. When I discovered them in the late seventies, I felt I had found the final ingredient I needed to write the fiction I wanted to write.

INTERVIEWER

What was the final ingredient?

DENNIS COOPER

Recognizing that the films were entirely about emotion and, to me, ­ profoundly moving while, at the same time, stylistically inexpressive and monotonic. On the surface, they were nothing but style, and the style was extremely rigorous to boot, but they seemed almost transparent and purely content driven. Bresson’s use of untrained nonactors influenced my concentration on characters who are amateurs or noncharacters or characters who are ill equipped to handle the job of manning a story line or holding the reader’s attention in a conventional way. Altogether, I think Bresson’s films had the greatest influence on my work of any art I’ve ever encountered. In fact, the first fiction of mine that was ever published was a chapbook called “Antoine Monnier,” which was a god-awful, incompetent attempt to rewrite Bresson’s film Le diable ­probablement as a pornographic novella. So I came to writing novels through a channel that included experimental fiction, poetry, and nonliterary influences pretty much exclusively. I never read normal novels with any real interest or close attention.
~ Dennis Cooper Discovers Bresson

The whole world within reach.
~ Filmmaker Peter Hutton

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