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Kim Voynar

By Kim Voynar Voynar@moviecitynews.com

Juno Temple Joins The Dark Knight Rises. Cool.

Here’s some casting news in which I’m particularly interested: Variety is EXCLUUUUUSIVELY reporting that indie starlet Juno Temple is locked to join the cast of Christopher Nolan’s The Dark Knight Rises. The pot had already been sweetened by the addition Joseph Gordon-Levitt to the mix, but Juno Temple being cast as well is great news.

Rumors are flying fast and furious as everyone gets into some heavy petting in their excitement about this film. Is Temple being cast as a Robin-like character? whispers Ain’t It Cool News. Nah, more likely as Holly Robinson, asserts Spinoff Online.

Meanwhile, Variety reports JGL has been cast as Alberto Falcone (The Holiday Killer), while EW calls bullshit.

As for Temple, she was great in Dirty Girl and KABOOM!, and I’ve been interested in seeing what path she’d take. I don’t think there’s a universe where agreeing to star in a Chris Nolan film is a bad move career-wise, with the caveat that I hope she’ll use that leverage to keep making smart choices and stay the hell away from lame rom-coms.

One Response to “Juno Temple Joins The Dark Knight Rises. Cool.”

  1. Yes! The cast of “The Dark Knight Rises” grows interesting with every new anoucement. Hope Nolan doesn’t lose narrative focus with so many characters. Love the way Nolan uses former character actors in all his movies; Hathaway seems like an odd choice here.

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