By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

PHASE 4 FILMS MAKES THE MOVE TO VOD: VIDAL SASSOON AND BROTHERHOOD TO GO DAY AND DATE

Los Angeles, CA (February 10, 2011) – Berry Meyerowitz, President & CEO of Phase 4 Films, announced today that the company has officially entered the video-on-demand (VOD) space.  This new endeavor for Phase 4 launches officially with the day-and-date theatrical and VOD release of several films including: Craig Teper’s VIDAL SASSOON THE MOVIE, a revealing and inspirational portrait of the iconic hairdresser who changed the world with a pair of scissors; the SXSW Audience Award-winner BROTHERHOOD, directed by Will Cannon and starring Jon Foster and Lou Taylor Pucci; and the documentary IRANIUM from director Alex Traiman about the Iranian nuclear threat and the ideology fueling the Iranian regime.  In addition to theatrical openings in major cities, the films will be available on demand in more than thirty million homes via several of the largest cable providers in the United States.

“As an independent film company in the year 2011, being in the video-on-demand space is an integral aspect of connecting our films with audiences,” says Meyerowitz.  “We still stand behind the theatrical model and believe for many of our films that it will always make sense. We also acknowledge that more and more people are now watching films on VOD at home. We have Vidal Sassoon being interviewed in many high profile national outlets so it is only fair that people who watch the interviews and then want to go and see the film, can do so without having to wait weeks or even months on end for the film to arrive in their market.”

In addition to the above mentioned day-and-date theatrical and VOD titles premiering in the weeks ahead, Phase 4 is launching an extensive slate of exclusive VOD World Premieres, as well as day-and-date VOD/DVD titles launching in the coming months, including Emily Young’s VERONIKA DECIDES TO DIE starring Sarah Michelle Gellar and Erika Christensen, based on the popular novel by Paulo Coelho (The Alchemist), and the new Steve Austin starring action film KNOCKOUT.

VIDAL SASSOON THE MOVIE opens this Friday (February 11) in New York at the Village East and will simultaneously be available nationwide on demand.

BROTHERHOOD opens next Friday (February 18) in Dallas at the Angelika and will simultaneously be available nationwide on demand.

IRANIUM opened this week and is available nationwide on demand.

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About Phase 4 Films

Phase 4 distributes feature films and special interest content across all media in North America.  The company’s recent slate included Brigitte Berman’s documentary HUGH HEFNER: PLAYBOY, ACTIVIST AND REBEL; THE FREEBIE starring Dax Shepard; 50 DEAD MAN WALKING, starring Sir Ben Kingsley and Jim Sturgess; and Matt Tyrnauer’s acclaimed VALENTINO: THE LAST EMPEROR.  Phase 4 will soon release the SXSW Audience Award-winning film BROTHERHOOD, starring Jon Foster and Lou Taylor Pucci; and the feature documentary, VIDAL SASSOON THE MOVIE, director Craig Teper’s revealing, and inspirational portrait of the iconic hairdresser who changed the world with a pair of scissors.

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“Any time a movie causes a country to threaten nuclear retaliation, the higher-ups wanna get in a room with you… In terms of getting the word out about the movie, it’s not bad. If they actually make good on it, it would be bad for the world—but luckily that doesn’t seem like their style… We’ll make a movie that maybe for two seconds will make some 18-year-old think about North Korea in a way he never would have otherwise. Or who knows? We were told one of the reasons they’re so against the movie is that they’re afraid it’ll actually get into North Korea. They do have bootlegs and stuff. Maybe the tapes will make their way to North Korea and cause a fucking revolution. At best, it will cause a country to be free, and at worst, it will cause a nuclear war. Big margin with this movie.”
~ Seth Rogen In Rolling Stone 1224

“Yes, good movies sprout up, inevitably, in the cracks and seams between the tectonic plates on which all of these franchises stay balanced, and we are reassured of their hardiness. But we don’t see what we don’t see; we don’t see the effort, or the cost of the effort, or the movies of which we’re deprived because of the cost of the effort. Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice may have come from a studio, but it still required a substantial chunk of outside financing, and at $35 million, it’s not even that expensive. No studio could find the $8.5 million it cost Dan Gilroy to make Nightcrawler. Birdman cost a mere $18 million and still had to scrape that together at the last minute. Imagine American movie culture for the last few years without Her or Foxcatcher or American Hustle or The Master or Zero Dark Thirty and it suddenly looks markedly more frail—and those movies exist only because of the fairy godmothership of independent producer Megan Ellison. The grace of billionaires is not a great business model on which to hang the hopes of an art form.”
~ Mark Harris On The State Of The Movies