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By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

David Lynch Launches DLF Music

David Lynch follows up his excursion into electronica with “David Lynch Foundation Music,” a scheme to benefit his version of Transcendental Meditation. From the site: “DLF Music brings together the world’s top & emerging recording artists to support the good works of the David Lynch Foundation’s stress-reducing, meditation-based educational programs. Featured artists of our Pledge compilation include: Arrested Development, Au Revoir Simone, Ben Folds, Peter Gabriel, Mary Hopkin, Moby, Maroon 5, Neon Trees, Ozomatli, Heather Nova, Iggy Pop, Carmen Rizzo, Salman Ahmad, Slightly Stoopid, Dave Stewart, Andy Summers and Tom Waits. When you Pledge for the 17-track compilation download, or any of the other unique items and experiences during this 6-week Pledge campaign, you gain access to Pledgers-only updates from participating DLF Music artists. Each week you will receive 2 or 3 of DLFMusic’s featured tracks … PLUS receive exclusive video, photo and blog updates, giving you an insider’s view into the artists lives and experiences.” What’s the kicker? “The David Lynch Foundation (DLF) is a non-profit educational organization which was established in July 2005 to ensure that anyone at-risk for traumatic stress can learn Transcendental Meditation. In the past five years, over 150,000 inner-city youth, veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder, homeless adults and children, American Indians, and inmates and guards in maximum security prisons have learned to meditate. Research on meditating students has found that the technique increases grades and improves test scores, boosts graduation rates while reducing stress, depression, anxiety, dropouts, suspensions, and expulsions.”

10 Responses to “David Lynch Launches DLF Music”

  1. Richard says:

    Very Cool. Way to go David!

  2. Thank You for the great music. This musicprojekt will support the foundation of David a lot!

  3. Joe says:

    The problem with Transcendental Meditation is that if you go past the “20 minutes twice a day” level of participation it becomes a full-blown cult. Google for “TM cult”.

  4. Ken Chawkin says:

    Really?! Is 30 minutes twice a day ok then? You know, maybe a few stretches and breathing exercises before meditation, and a few minutes resting afterward? Or is that bordering on being a cult?

  5. Joe says:

    Practicing Transcendental Meditation for “twenty minutes twice a day” is fine. But the TM organization encourages people to go *far* beyond that, and many do. As people slide into deeper levels of involvement they can very soon start to believe that they can **physically levitate** (e.g. http://bit.ly/ehG99E and http://bit.ly/en4BYe). They think they can learn to become invisible and can learn to *literally* attain the physical strength of an elephant, and that many other supernatural feats can be learned as well. And that’s just the beginning (http://www.suggestibility.org/stillFalling.shtml). And all of this adds up to a lot of money. At the deepest levels of involvement severe psychological damage can result (http://www.suggestibility.org/surprise.php).

    The head of the TM organization wears a gold crown and calls himself the “Great King” (“maharaja”) of The Global Country of World Peace. He has a number of assistant Kings (“rajas”) that also wear gold crowns. They each govern different areas of the world, and each paid $1,000,000 for the privilege. Here is a picture of of TM’s King of America standing behind TM’s King of the World: http://bit.ly/eZCI7E.

  6. Joe says:

    Anyone truly interested in TM will want to see this: http://bit.ly/fcTgdH (here’s the Facebook page: http://on.fb.me/hf5zi3). David Sieveking is a young filmmaker who is a devoted fan of David Lynch’s films. On Lynch’s recommendation Sieveking started TM and started making a film about it. During the process of making the film Sieveking began to discover some things that unsettled him, and he documented them in the film. When Lynch got wind of what they were he threatened a lawsuit unless he could approve the final cut (I have this straight from Sieveking personally).

    What is Lynch worried about? He has a lot more money than the small production company making the film, and because of the attempted suppression the film has only been released in Germany, but you can get it from amazon.de: http://amzn.to/hwyayy. You can use the same userid and password as on amazon.com, and can use Google’s translation service to help you: http://tinyurl.com/4hdxuox. However Google can’t translate images so the best thing to do is to start buying something on amazon.com and follow along with the process on amazon.de.

  7. Phil says:

    This david lynch, TM, mumbo jumbo non- sense sounds like a bunch of satan inspired new age crap. where are the black – eyed peas when you need them.

  8. Ken Chawkin says:

    Yogic Flying looks like fun!

  9. Sheira says:

    My feeling is why knock it if you haven’t tried it. I’ve been meditating for about 10 years and it ALWAYS gives me clarity, joy and inner peace. For me it’s not a form of addiction at all – sometimes I do it; sometimes I don’t have time. But it’s a tool to help people reduce stress and feel calmer. What’s wrong with that?

  10. Mike says:

    “Satan inspired new age crap.” Hmmm… because there’s nothing nonsensical about Christianity, which in my opinion, is as indistinguishable from any other cult. Religion: control of the many by the few. I have no doubt in my mind that meditation is beneficial, but I don’t think you need to pay thousands of dollars to receive personal instruction and a mantra.

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“I’ve been pleasantly surprised by how many recappers, while clearly over their heads, are baseline sympathetic to finding themselves routinely unmoored, even if that means repeating over and over that this is closer to “avant-garde art” than  normal TV to meet the word count. My feed was busy connecting the dots to Peter Tscherkassky (gas station), Tony Conrad (the giant staring at feedback of what we’ve just seen), Pat O’Neill (bombs away) et al., and this is all apposite — visual and conceptual thinking along possibly inadvertent parallel lines. If recappers can’t find those exact reference points to latch onto, that speaks less to willful ignorance than to how unfortunately severed experimental film is from nearly all mainstream discussions of film because it’s generally hard to see outside of privileged contexts (fests, academia, the secret knowledge of a self-preserving circle working with a very finite set of resources and publicity access to the larger world); resources/capital/access/etc. So I won’t assign demerits for willful incuriosity, even if some recappers are reduced, in some unpleasantly condescending/bluffing cases, to dismissing this as a “student film” — because presumably experimentation is something the seasoned artist gets out of their system in maturity, following the George Lucas Model of graduating from Bruce Conner visuals to Lawrence Kasdan’s screenwriting.”
~ Vadim Rizov Goes For It, A Bit

“On the first ‘Twin Peaks,’ doing TV was like going from a mansion to a hut. But the arthouses are gone now, so cable television is a godsend — they’re the new art houses. You’ve got tons of freedom to do the work you want to do on TV, but there is a restriction in terms of picture and sound. The range of television is restricted. It’s hard for the power and the glory to come through. In other words, you can have things in a theater much louder and also much quieter. With TV, the quieter things have to be louder and the louder things have to be quieter, so you have less dynamics. The picture quality — it’s fine if you have a giant television with a good speaker system, but a lot of people will watch this on their laptops or whatever, so the picture and the sound are going to suffer big time. Optimally, people should be watching TV in a dark room with no disturbances and with as big and good a picture as possible and with as great sound as possible.”
~ David Lynch