By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES ACQUIRES REMAKE RIGHTS TO THE BENGALI DETECTIVE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Specialty Arm Acquires Worldwide Remake Rights

PARK CITY, UT January 24, 2011 – Fox Searchlight Pictures President of Production Claudia Lewis announced today that the company has acquired worldwide remake rights from Native Voice Films to the entertaining original feature documentary, THE BENGALI DETECTIVE, directed by Philip Cox and produced by Giovanna Stopponi, Annie Sundberg and Himesh Kar.

“We adored this film and are delighted to have the chance to work with such entertaining, funny material. We were charmed by this story of a dedicated husband and self-made detective who dreams big,” said Lewis.

“We are thrilled that Fox Searchlight has fallen in love with our leading man Rajesh and his wild adventures as a detective in Kolkata.  Fox Searchlight has an amazing track record of bringing stories set in India to a worldwide audience, and we are excited to be sharing this journey with them,” said director Phil Cox and The Bengali Detective team.

In THE BENGALI DETECTIVE, Calcutta’s criminal underworld is explored by intrepid private eye Rajesh Ji.  Following both his investigations and Rajesh’s pursuit of his dream to dance on Indian TV, THE BENGALI DETECTIVE provides a look at modern India through the eyes of one of its most unlikely heroes.

The deal was brokered on Fox Searchlight’s side by Senior Vice President of Business Affairs Megan O’Brien with Andrew Hurwitz of Schreck Rose Dapello Adams & Hurwitz, LLP on behalf of Native Voice Films.  Creative Executive Richard Gold will oversee development for Fox Searchlight Pictures.

Fox Searchlight Pictures is a specialty film company that both finances and acquires motion pictures.  It has its own marketing and distribution operations.  Fox Searchlight Pictures is a unit of Fox Filmed Entertainment, a unit of Fox Entertainment Group.

FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES A UNIT OF FOX FILMED ENTERTAINMENT

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