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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

Essential Killing, director Jerzy Skolimowski

3 Responses to “Essential Killing, director Jerzy Skolimowski”

  1. Sarah Melsom says:

    Sounds like an interesting film. Mr Skolimowski seems kind and thoughtful. I heard from many friends Vincent Gallo’s performance is spectacular. The interviewer mentions Vincent Gallo as difficult to work with and yet i have never heard a single filmmaker mention Gallo as difficult. Francis Ford Coppola mentions how much he love Gallo and how funny he was. I think for Gallo the negative response to his website humor (which i think is super funny and smart) gets confused with his working habits and real person. I met him once and found him extremely attractive, funny and kind.

  2. movieman says:

    It’s been a long time since the days of “Moonlighting,” “The Shout” and “Deep End,” but I’m willing to give Skolimowski the benefit of the doubt.
    And I’m still hoping to someday see “Four Nights of Anna” from 2009 which is supposed to be terrific.
    Does “Essential” have a distributer (or U.S. release date) yet? It’s one of the year-end screeners I still haven’t gotten around to watching.

  3. I saw this page bookmarked and I truly liked it. will surely bookmark it too and go through your other articles when I get home.

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DP/30

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DENNIS COOPER

The next thing that really changed my world and thoroughly influenced my writing were the films of Robert Bresson. When I discovered them in the late seventies, I felt I had found the final ingredient I needed to write the fiction I wanted to write.

INTERVIEWER

What was the final ingredient?

DENNIS COOPER

Recognizing that the films were entirely about emotion and, to me, ­ profoundly moving while, at the same time, stylistically inexpressive and monotonic. On the surface, they were nothing but style, and the style was extremely rigorous to boot, but they seemed almost transparent and purely content driven. Bresson’s use of untrained nonactors influenced my concentration on characters who are amateurs or noncharacters or characters who are ill equipped to handle the job of manning a story line or holding the reader’s attention in a conventional way. Altogether, I think Bresson’s films had the greatest influence on my work of any art I’ve ever encountered. In fact, the first fiction of mine that was ever published was a chapbook called “Antoine Monnier,” which was a god-awful, incompetent attempt to rewrite Bresson’s film Le diable ­probablement as a pornographic novella. So I came to writing novels through a channel that included experimental fiction, poetry, and nonliterary influences pretty much exclusively. I never read normal novels with any real interest or close attention.
~ Dennis Cooper Discovers Bresson

The whole world within reach.
~ Filmmaker Peter Hutton

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