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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

Essential Killing, director Jerzy Skolimowski

3 Responses to “Essential Killing, director Jerzy Skolimowski”

  1. Sarah Melsom says:

    Sounds like an interesting film. Mr Skolimowski seems kind and thoughtful. I heard from many friends Vincent Gallo’s performance is spectacular. The interviewer mentions Vincent Gallo as difficult to work with and yet i have never heard a single filmmaker mention Gallo as difficult. Francis Ford Coppola mentions how much he love Gallo and how funny he was. I think for Gallo the negative response to his website humor (which i think is super funny and smart) gets confused with his working habits and real person. I met him once and found him extremely attractive, funny and kind.

  2. movieman says:

    It’s been a long time since the days of “Moonlighting,” “The Shout” and “Deep End,” but I’m willing to give Skolimowski the benefit of the doubt.
    And I’m still hoping to someday see “Four Nights of Anna” from 2009 which is supposed to be terrific.
    Does “Essential” have a distributer (or U.S. release date) yet? It’s one of the year-end screeners I still haven’t gotten around to watching.

  3. I saw this page bookmarked and I truly liked it. will surely bookmark it too and go through your other articles when I get home.

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DP/30

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“We don’t defy the laws of physics: There are no flying men or cars in this movie. So it made sense to do it old-school: real vehicles and real human beings in the desert. We shot the movie more or less in continuity, because the cars and the characters get really banged up along the way. The biggest benefit of digital technology for me was that the cameras were smaller and much more agile, so you could put them anywhere. We also spent a huge amount of time on spatial awareness—making sure the viewer could follow the action and understand what was happening. There has to be a strong causal connection from one shot to the next, just the same way that in music, there has to be a connection from one note to the next. Otherwise it’s just noise. Too often, if you just cram a lot of stuff into the frame, you get the illusion of a fast pace. But there’s no coherence. It doesn’t flow. It comes off as headbanging music, and it can be exhausting. We storyboarded the movie before we had a script: We had 3,500 boards, which helps the cast and crew understand how everything is going to fit together. Movies are getting faster and faster. The Road Warrior had 1,200 cuts. This one has 2,700 cuts. You have to treat it like a symphony.”
~ George Miller

“I was having issues with my script for It’s All About Love, so I called Ingmar Bergman and we ended up talking about everything but the script. He said, “Well, Festen is a masterpiece, so what are you going to do now?” At that point, I had not decided if I was going to make It’s All About Love, so I answered, “Hmmm, I don’t know. Maybe this, maybe that.” There was just a long pause, and then he said, “You’re fucked.” I said, “Well, how can you know?” “Well, Thomas, you always have to decide your next movie before the movie you’re doing presently opens.” And I said, “Why is that?” “Well, two things can happen. One thing is that you fail, and then you’ll feel scared and humiliated. It’ll get into your head. Second, and even worse, you have success, and then you’ll want more of it, or you’ll want to maintain it. But if you decide on your next film while you’re in the middle of editing, it becomes a very nonchalant choice. And then it’s shorter from the heart to the hand.”
~ Thomas Vinterberg

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