Z
MCN Blogs

By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

Essential Killing, director Jerzy Skolimowski

3 Responses to “Essential Killing, director Jerzy Skolimowski”

  1. Sarah Melsom says:

    Sounds like an interesting film. Mr Skolimowski seems kind and thoughtful. I heard from many friends Vincent Gallo’s performance is spectacular. The interviewer mentions Vincent Gallo as difficult to work with and yet i have never heard a single filmmaker mention Gallo as difficult. Francis Ford Coppola mentions how much he love Gallo and how funny he was. I think for Gallo the negative response to his website humor (which i think is super funny and smart) gets confused with his working habits and real person. I met him once and found him extremely attractive, funny and kind.

  2. movieman says:

    It’s been a long time since the days of “Moonlighting,” “The Shout” and “Deep End,” but I’m willing to give Skolimowski the benefit of the doubt.
    And I’m still hoping to someday see “Four Nights of Anna” from 2009 which is supposed to be terrific.
    Does “Essential” have a distributer (or U.S. release date) yet? It’s one of the year-end screeners I still haven’t gotten around to watching.

  3. I saw this page bookmarked and I truly liked it. will surely bookmark it too and go through your other articles when I get home.

Leave a Reply

DP/30

Quote Unquotesee all »

“I don’t believe in the Nietzschean notion that what doesn’t destroy you makes you stronger. You see these soldiers come back with PTSD; they’ve been to war and seen death and experienced these existential crises one after the other. There are traumas in life that weaken us for the future. And that’s what’s happened to me. The various slings and arrows of life have not strengthened me. I think I’m weaker. I think there are things I couldn’t take now that I would have been able to take when I was younger.”
~ Woody Allen

“Hitchcock films the story with a wide-eyed, astonished, fascinated, and disturbed camera stare that seems to shudder and tremble every time Hedren is onscreen. Even the director’s cameo—in which he watches Hedren walking down a hotel corridor and then turns back to look at the camera, shamefacedly caught in his own leer—suggests his self-aware sense of visual carnality. The images offer an extraordinary swing between blasts of heat and an eerie chill, sometimes bringing the two together. Even the film’s exterior locations have a fluorescent buzz that captures an ambient sense of derangement.”
~ Richard Brody on Marnie

 

Z Weekend Report