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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

Rabbit Hole, actor/producer Nicole Kidman

9 Responses to “Rabbit Hole, actor/producer Nicole Kidman”

  1. Enjoyed this very much. Especially interesting to hear her share about her choices that challenge her, and stretch her artistically.

  2. Highwayroller says:

    Whoa… Whoa. I am absolutely hypnotized. I mean, there’s a lot of fine actors in the world, but she is just a standout, she will fascinate people her whole carierre. Just look at this interview… Thank you very much.

  3. John says:

    She’s amazing. And brilliant.

  4. Glenn says:

    Amazing woman and an amazing interview.

  5. AJ says:

    Is it sad that I’ve been waiting for a Nicole Kidman interview to pop up here? Ugh, an hour and a half unbroken shot of this legend–heaven.

  6. Debra S says:

    Incredible interview. Nicole is simply fascinating. Such good things coming her way and she deserves it.

  7. Dan says:

    What a nice interview, David. Nicole seemed so open and engaged. I love listening to her because it’s like a breath of fresh air. She’s the most fascinating actress right now, indeed.

  8. Gab says:

    I love love love Nicole and this totally made my day. She is so honest and sweet, I can imagine how amazing it was interviewing her. Thanks for posting!

  9. movieman says:

    ….so I guess Nic IS in the new Sandler movie after all.
    Hooray!!!!
    I’m still trying to figure out why Sony has made it their mission to hide her in any of the film’s trailers. Hell, if I had Nicole Kidman in my new Adam Sandler/Jennifer Aniston comedy, I’d shout it from the mountaintop.

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“The core fear is what can happen to you, personally. Your body. That’s what horror films deal with, precisely. We are a very thin skin wrapped around a pumping heart and guts. At any given moment it can come down to that, be it diseases, or somebody’s assault, or war, or a car wreck. You could be reduced to the simple laws of physics and your body’s vulnerability. The edged weapon is the penultimate weapon to disclose that reality to you.”
~ Wes Craven, 1996, promoting Scream

MAMET
Well, that, to me, is always the trick of dramaturgy; theoretically, perfectly, what one wants to do is put the protagonist and the audience in exactly the same position. The main question in drama, the way I was taught, is always what does the protagonist want. That’s what drama is. It comes down to that. It’s not about theme, it’s not about ideas, it’s not about setting, but what the protagonist wants. What gives rise to the drama, what is the precipitating event, and how, at the end of the play, do we see that event culminated? Do we see the protagonist’s wishes fulfilled or absolutely frustrated? That’s the structure of drama. You break it down into three acts.

INTERVIEWER
Does this explain why your plays have so little exposition?

MAMET
Yes. People only speak to get something. If I say, Let me tell you a few things about myself, already your defenses go up; you go, Look, I wonder what he wants from me, because no one ever speaks except to obtain an objective. That’s the only reason anyone ever opens their mouth, onstage or offstage. They may use a language that seems revealing, but if so, it’s just coincidence, because what they’re trying to do is accomplish an objective… The question is where does the dramatist have to lead you? Answer: the place where he or she thinks the audience needs to be led. But what does the character think? Does the character need to convey that information? If the answer is no, then you’d better cut it out, because you aren’t putting the audience in the same position with the protagonist. You’re saying, in effect, Let’s stop the play. That’s what the narration is doing—stopping the play… It’s action, as Aristotle said. That’s all that it is—exactly what the person does. It’s not what they “think,” because we don’t know what they think. It’s not what they say. It’s what they do, what they’re physically trying to accomplish on the stage. Which is exactly the same way we understand a person’s character in life—not by what they say, but by what they do. Say someone came up to you and said, I’m glad to be your neighbor because I’m a very honest man. That’s my character. I’m honest, I like to do things, I’m forthright, I like to be clear about everything, I like to be concise. Well, you really don’t know anything about that guy’s character. Or the person is onstage, and the playwright has him or her make those same claims in several subtle or not-so-subtle ways, the audience will say, Oh yes, I understand their character now; now I understand that they are a character. But in fact you don’t understand anything. You just understand that they’re jabbering to try to convince you of something.
~ David Mamet

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