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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

Blue Valentine, actor Michelle Williams

11 Responses to “Blue Valentine, actor Michelle Williams”

  1. Samuel Deter says:

    I have GOT to work with this woman. Such a good actress. So interesting. So genuine. So smart. So humble.

    Good interview Polonia! (that’s Poland in spanish)

  2. sanj says:

    this was a bit different – Michelle slowed her speech for
    first 15 minutes then went back to normal the rest of the way..

    there was only 7 minutes that was the movie itself

    since her movies aren’t repeated too often on regular cable – most of us know her from Dawson’s Creek repeats

    overall – i liked the Wendy and Lucy DP/30

  3. LexG says:

    LOOK AT HER!

  4. anghus says:

    talented gal. she’s done a great job of picking good material (mostly) and has avoided the dreaded hell of a katherine heigl career.

  5. Michael. says:

    15:07 – 15:18 was a really heartfelt moment, I think she was close to losing it but kept her composure. She’s so great, good interview DP.

  6. Foamy Squirrel says:

    Anghus: it depends on what you consider “dreaded”. I’m fairly sure there’s a sizable contingent of budding actresses who would pick a career modeled after Katherine Heigl over a career modeled after Michelle Williams.

  7. movieman says:

    Personally I’m getting a little sick and tired of Williams’ affected Method-isms. And with her new blonde dye job she’s beginning to remind me a tad of the post-“Aphrodite” Mira Sorvino.
    That said, I loved the Cassavetes rawness and bruising emotional intensity of “Blue Valentine,” although it’s really Gosling’s picture.

  8. Grace says:

    8:58 – “are you hard on yourself?”

    Wow. That sweetness just can’t be contained. Great interview. Would love to see one with Gosling.

  9. leahnz says:

    i didn’t realise ‘blue valentine’ was shot in single takes. i’m keen to see it.

  10. erin says:

    Movieman…i am curious what you mean by affected methodisms?

  11. Rahmbo says:

    MW comes across as a little precious especially when talking about the filming of Blue Valentine… perhaps that’s what movieman was referring to.

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DP/30

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“I was 15 when I first watched Sally Hardesty escape into the back of a pickup truck, covered in blood and cackling like a goddamn witch. All of her friends were dead. She had been kidnapped, tortured and even forced to feed her own blood to her cannibalistic captors’ impossibly shriveled patriarch. Being new to the horror genre, I was sure she was going to die. It had been a few months since I survived a violent sexual assault, where I subsequently ran from my assailant, tripped, fell and fought like hell. I crawled home with bloody knees, makeup-stained cheeks and a new void in both my mind and heart. My sense of safety, my ability to trust others, my willingness to form new relationships and my love of spending time with people I cared about were all taken from me. It wasn’t until I found the original The Texas Chain Saw Massacre that something clicked. It was Sally’s strength, and her resilience. It was watching her survive blows to the head from a hammer. It was watching her break free from her bonds and burst through a glass window. It was watching her get back up after she’d been stabbed. It was watching her crawl into the back of a truck, laughing as it drove away from Leatherface. She was the last one to confront the killer, and live. I remember sitting in front of the TV and thinking, There I am. That’s me.”
~ Lauren Milici On “The Final Girl”

“‘Thriller’ enforced its own reality principle; it was there, part of the every commute, a serenade to every errand, a referent to every purchase, a fact of every life. You didn’t have to like it, you only had to acknowledge it. By July 6, 1984, when the Jacksons played the first show of their ‘Victory’ tour, in Kansas City, Missouri, Jacksonism had produced a system of commodification so complete that whatever and whoever was admitted to it instantly became a new commodity. People were no longer comsuming commodities as such things are conventionally understood (records, videos, posters, books, magazines, key rings, earrings necklaces pins buttons wigs voice-altering devices Pepsis t-shirts underwear hats scarves gloves jackets – and why were there no jeans called Bille Jeans?); they were consuming their own gestures of consumption. That is, they were consuming not a Tayloristic Michael Jackson, or any licensed facsimile, but themselves. Riding a Mobius strip of pure capitalism, that was the transubstantiation.”
~ Greil Marcus On Michael Jackson