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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

Blue Valentine, actor Michelle Williams

11 Responses to “Blue Valentine, actor Michelle Williams”

  1. Samuel Deter says:

    I have GOT to work with this woman. Such a good actress. So interesting. So genuine. So smart. So humble.

    Good interview Polonia! (that’s Poland in spanish)

  2. sanj says:

    this was a bit different – Michelle slowed her speech for
    first 15 minutes then went back to normal the rest of the way..

    there was only 7 minutes that was the movie itself

    since her movies aren’t repeated too often on regular cable – most of us know her from Dawson’s Creek repeats

    overall – i liked the Wendy and Lucy DP/30

  3. LexG says:

    LOOK AT HER!

  4. anghus says:

    talented gal. she’s done a great job of picking good material (mostly) and has avoided the dreaded hell of a katherine heigl career.

  5. Michael. says:

    15:07 – 15:18 was a really heartfelt moment, I think she was close to losing it but kept her composure. She’s so great, good interview DP.

  6. Foamy Squirrel says:

    Anghus: it depends on what you consider “dreaded”. I’m fairly sure there’s a sizable contingent of budding actresses who would pick a career modeled after Katherine Heigl over a career modeled after Michelle Williams.

  7. movieman says:

    Personally I’m getting a little sick and tired of Williams’ affected Method-isms. And with her new blonde dye job she’s beginning to remind me a tad of the post-“Aphrodite” Mira Sorvino.
    That said, I loved the Cassavetes rawness and bruising emotional intensity of “Blue Valentine,” although it’s really Gosling’s picture.

  8. Grace says:

    8:58 – “are you hard on yourself?”

    Wow. That sweetness just can’t be contained. Great interview. Would love to see one with Gosling.

  9. leahnz says:

    i didn’t realise ‘blue valentine’ was shot in single takes. i’m keen to see it.

  10. erin says:

    Movieman…i am curious what you mean by affected methodisms?

  11. Rahmbo says:

    MW comes across as a little precious especially when talking about the filming of Blue Valentine… perhaps that’s what movieman was referring to.

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DP/30

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“To be a critic is to be a workaholic. Workaholism is socially conditioned: viewed favourably by exploiters, it’s generally ruinous to a worker’s mental health. When T.S. Eliot said criticism was as inevitable as breathing, he failed to mention that, respiratory problems notwithstanding, breathing is easy. Criticism is reflexive before reflective: to formalise/industrialise an involuntary instinct requires time, effort and discipline. The reason we seek remuneration, as opposed to the self-hatred of being a scab, is because all labour should be waged…

“Criticism, so the cliché by now goes, is dying. None of the panel discussions on its death agony, however—including those in which I’ve formally participated—come at it from the wider perspective that the problem surely needs. They defend the ways in which criticism functions in relation to the industry and to the public, but they fail to contextualise these relationships as defined by ultimately rotten and self-harming imperatives.

“Criticism was a noble profession so long as only a few could practice it for money; when the field expands, as it has with a so-called ‘democratisation’ of our practice, those few lose their political power. Competition grows and markets are undercut: publications are naturally going to start paying less. Precarity is both cause and effect of a surplus workforce: the reason you’re only as good as your last article is because there are plenty of other folks who can write the next one in your place. The daily grind is: pitch, or perish.

B”ut criticism, so a counter-cliché goes, is not dying. An irony: this is an elite sport that is no longer elite in terms of who is able to practice it, but in economic terms it’s clutching to a perverse and outmoded hierarchical structure. It’s more meritocratic than ever, now: which is to say it isn’t meritocratic at all. That’s a paradox in bad need of a resolution…”

~ Michael Pattison Manifestoes Film Criticism

“It’s easy to forget when you’re reading a critic every single week or multiple times a week, that most of us who do this job, and have been doing it for a long time, understand that this is basically a parasitic profession. I don’t mean in the sense that we’re evil bloodsucking creatures, but we couldn’t exist if we didn’t have something to analyze. And I’m always conscious of that. So whether I like or don’t like a particular thing you do, my point of view is always that of an appreciator. I just like to be in the world that you create.”
~ Matt Zoller Seitz To Sam Esmail

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