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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

Blue Valentine, actor Michelle Williams

11 Responses to “Blue Valentine, actor Michelle Williams”

  1. Samuel Deter says:

    I have GOT to work with this woman. Such a good actress. So interesting. So genuine. So smart. So humble.

    Good interview Polonia! (that’s Poland in spanish)

  2. sanj says:

    this was a bit different – Michelle slowed her speech for
    first 15 minutes then went back to normal the rest of the way..

    there was only 7 minutes that was the movie itself

    since her movies aren’t repeated too often on regular cable – most of us know her from Dawson’s Creek repeats

    overall – i liked the Wendy and Lucy DP/30

  3. LexG says:

    LOOK AT HER!

  4. anghus says:

    talented gal. she’s done a great job of picking good material (mostly) and has avoided the dreaded hell of a katherine heigl career.

  5. Michael. says:

    15:07 – 15:18 was a really heartfelt moment, I think she was close to losing it but kept her composure. She’s so great, good interview DP.

  6. Foamy Squirrel says:

    Anghus: it depends on what you consider “dreaded”. I’m fairly sure there’s a sizable contingent of budding actresses who would pick a career modeled after Katherine Heigl over a career modeled after Michelle Williams.

  7. movieman says:

    Personally I’m getting a little sick and tired of Williams’ affected Method-isms. And with her new blonde dye job she’s beginning to remind me a tad of the post-”Aphrodite” Mira Sorvino.
    That said, I loved the Cassavetes rawness and bruising emotional intensity of “Blue Valentine,” although it’s really Gosling’s picture.

  8. Grace says:

    8:58 – “are you hard on yourself?”

    Wow. That sweetness just can’t be contained. Great interview. Would love to see one with Gosling.

  9. leahnz says:

    i didn’t realise ‘blue valentine’ was shot in single takes. i’m keen to see it.

  10. erin says:

    Movieman…i am curious what you mean by affected methodisms?

  11. Rahmbo says:

    MW comes across as a little precious especially when talking about the filming of Blue Valentine… perhaps that’s what movieman was referring to.

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“I don’t know, because I don’t know much about those cameras. I know that’s been a complaint, but I wouldn’t know. Film is what worked for this film. I have a fear of the unknown. I’ve spent a long time trying to learn one camera, and to fucking stop and try to learn another one… I would have to stop for 20 years! I’m a slow learner; I’d have to go through the manual, it would be starting over. So there’s that, too. It’s an issue for filmmakers, and it’s on people’s minds, and I have to say that it’s a lot more challenging and difficult just to kind of get somebody to show film or to print film. It’s far more challenging than it should be right now, and we’re just trying to keep it alive a little bit and create a little pocket where it can be shown that way in various places across the country right now.”
~ Paul Thomas Anderson To David Ehrlich On The Prospect Of Switching From Film

“Almodóvar–the first name is almost unnecessary–is a genius, is a flower, is a guiding light: the last, best son of Buñuel and so much more than that. His screenplays, which he directs with passion and fine care, have taught us about the exteriors of his native land and the interiors of our own hearts. From the early, manic experimental Super-8 work to the breakthrough Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, his titles are as evocative as most people’s screenplays. Yet for all their antic energy, Almodóvar’s films are deeply spiritual: watching his disturbing, mysterious, heart-rending Talk to Her is to understand, perhaps for the first time, the full meaning of grace. An Almodóvar screenplay is a running leap off a Gaudi balcony, it flips, soars, ascends, careens, tumbles, falls – always landing, astonishingly and astonished, on its feet.”
~ Howard A. Rodman, Announcing Almodóvar’s Jean Renoir Award