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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

Blue Valentine, actor Michelle Williams

11 Responses to “Blue Valentine, actor Michelle Williams”

  1. Samuel Deter says:

    I have GOT to work with this woman. Such a good actress. So interesting. So genuine. So smart. So humble.

    Good interview Polonia! (that’s Poland in spanish)

  2. sanj says:

    this was a bit different – Michelle slowed her speech for
    first 15 minutes then went back to normal the rest of the way..

    there was only 7 minutes that was the movie itself

    since her movies aren’t repeated too often on regular cable – most of us know her from Dawson’s Creek repeats

    overall – i liked the Wendy and Lucy DP/30

  3. LexG says:

    LOOK AT HER!

  4. anghus says:

    talented gal. she’s done a great job of picking good material (mostly) and has avoided the dreaded hell of a katherine heigl career.

  5. Michael. says:

    15:07 – 15:18 was a really heartfelt moment, I think she was close to losing it but kept her composure. She’s so great, good interview DP.

  6. Foamy Squirrel says:

    Anghus: it depends on what you consider “dreaded”. I’m fairly sure there’s a sizable contingent of budding actresses who would pick a career modeled after Katherine Heigl over a career modeled after Michelle Williams.

  7. movieman says:

    Personally I’m getting a little sick and tired of Williams’ affected Method-isms. And with her new blonde dye job she’s beginning to remind me a tad of the post-“Aphrodite” Mira Sorvino.
    That said, I loved the Cassavetes rawness and bruising emotional intensity of “Blue Valentine,” although it’s really Gosling’s picture.

  8. Grace says:

    8:58 – “are you hard on yourself?”

    Wow. That sweetness just can’t be contained. Great interview. Would love to see one with Gosling.

  9. leahnz says:

    i didn’t realise ‘blue valentine’ was shot in single takes. i’m keen to see it.

  10. erin says:

    Movieman…i am curious what you mean by affected methodisms?

  11. Rahmbo says:

    MW comes across as a little precious especially when talking about the filming of Blue Valentine… perhaps that’s what movieman was referring to.

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DP/30

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“There are critics who see their job as to be on the side of the artist, or in a state of imaginative sympathy or alliance with the artist. I think it’s important for a critic to be populist in the sense that we’re on the side of the public. I think one of the reasons is, frankly, capitalism. Whether you’re talking about restaurants or you’re talking about movies, you’re talking about large-scale commercial enterprises that are trying to sell themselves and market themselves and publicize themselves. A critic is, in a way, offering consumer advice. I think it’s very, very important in a time where everything is commercialized, commodified, and branded, where advertising is constantly bleeding into other forms of discourse, for there to be an independent voice kind of speaking to—and to some extent on behalf of—the public.”
~ A. O. Scott On One Role Of The Critic

“Every night, we’d sit and talk for a long, long time and talk about the process and I knew he was very, very intrigued about what could be happening. Then of course, one of the fascinating things he told me about was how he had readers who were reading for him that never knew it was Stanley Kubrick. So if he heard of a novel, he would send it out to people. I think he did it through newspaper ads at the time. And he would send it out to people and ask for a kind of synopsis or a critique of the novel. And he would read those. And it was done anonymously. But he said there were housewives and there were barristers and all sorts of people doing that. And I thought, yeah, that’s a really good way to open up the possibilities. Because otherwise, you’re randomly looking, walking through a bookstore or an airport. I said, “How many people are doing this?” It was about 30 people.”
~ George Miller’s Conversations With Kubrick