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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

Blue Valentine, actor Michelle Williams

11 Responses to “Blue Valentine, actor Michelle Williams”

  1. Samuel Deter says:

    I have GOT to work with this woman. Such a good actress. So interesting. So genuine. So smart. So humble.

    Good interview Polonia! (that’s Poland in spanish)

  2. sanj says:

    this was a bit different – Michelle slowed her speech for
    first 15 minutes then went back to normal the rest of the way..

    there was only 7 minutes that was the movie itself

    since her movies aren’t repeated too often on regular cable – most of us know her from Dawson’s Creek repeats

    overall – i liked the Wendy and Lucy DP/30

  3. LexG says:

    LOOK AT HER!

  4. anghus says:

    talented gal. she’s done a great job of picking good material (mostly) and has avoided the dreaded hell of a katherine heigl career.

  5. Michael. says:

    15:07 – 15:18 was a really heartfelt moment, I think she was close to losing it but kept her composure. She’s so great, good interview DP.

  6. Foamy Squirrel says:

    Anghus: it depends on what you consider “dreaded”. I’m fairly sure there’s a sizable contingent of budding actresses who would pick a career modeled after Katherine Heigl over a career modeled after Michelle Williams.

  7. movieman says:

    Personally I’m getting a little sick and tired of Williams’ affected Method-isms. And with her new blonde dye job she’s beginning to remind me a tad of the post-“Aphrodite” Mira Sorvino.
    That said, I loved the Cassavetes rawness and bruising emotional intensity of “Blue Valentine,” although it’s really Gosling’s picture.

  8. Grace says:

    8:58 – “are you hard on yourself?”

    Wow. That sweetness just can’t be contained. Great interview. Would love to see one with Gosling.

  9. leahnz says:

    i didn’t realise ‘blue valentine’ was shot in single takes. i’m keen to see it.

  10. erin says:

    Movieman…i am curious what you mean by affected methodisms?

  11. Rahmbo says:

    MW comes across as a little precious especially when talking about the filming of Blue Valentine… perhaps that’s what movieman was referring to.

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DP/30

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“I suddenly couldn’t say anything about some of the movies. They were just so terrible, and I’d already written about so many terrible movies. I love writing about movies when I can discover something in them – when I can get something out of them that I can share with people. The week I quit, I hadn’t planned on it. But I wrote up a couple of movies, and I read what I’d written, and it was just incredibly depressing. I thought, I’ve got nothing to share from this. One of them was of that movie with Woody Allen and Bette Midler, Scenes From a Mall. I couldn’t write another bad review of Bette Midler. I thought she was so brilliant, and when I saw her in that terrible production of ‘Gypsy’ on television, my heart sank. And I’d already panned her in Beaches. How can you go on panning people in picture after picture when you know they were great just a few years before? You have so much emotional investment in praising people that when you have to pan the same people a few years later, it tears your spirits apart.”
~ Pauline Kael On Quitting

“My father was a Jerome. My daughter’s middle name is Jerome. But my most vexing and vexed relationship with a Jerome was with Jerome Levitch, the subject of my first book under his stage and screen name, Jerry Lewis.

I have a lot of strong and complex feelings about the man, who passed away today in Las Vegas at age 91. Suffice to say he was a brilliant talent, an immense humanitarian, a difficult boss/interview, and a quixotic sort of genius, as often inspired as insipid, as often tender as caustic.

I wrote all about it in my 1996 book, “King of Comedy,” which is available on Kindle. With all due humility, it’s kinda definitive — the good and the bad — even though it’s two decades old. My favorite review, and one I begged St. Martin’s (unsuccessfully) to put on the paperback jacket, came from “Screw” magazine, which called it “A remarkably fair portrait of a great American asshole.”

Jerry and I met twice while I was working on the book and spoke/wrote to each other perhaps a dozen times. Like many of his relationships with the press and his partners/subordinates, it ended badly, with Jerry hollering profanities at me in the cabin of his yacht in San Diego. I wrote about it in the epilogue to my book, and over the years I’ve had the scene quoted back to me by Steve Martin, Harry Shearer, Paul Provenza and Penn Jillette. Tom Hanks once told me that he had a dinner with Paul Reiser and Martin Short at which Short spent the night imitating Jerry throwing me off the boat.

Jerry was a lot of things: father, husband, chum, businessman, philanthropist, artist, innovator, clown, tyrant. He was at various times in his life the highest-ever-paid performer on TV, in movies, and on Broadway. He raised BILLIONS for charity, invented filmmaking techniques, made perhaps a dozen classic comedies, turned in a terrific dramatic performance in Martin Scorsese’s “The King of Comedy,” and left the world altered and even enhanced with his time and his work in it.

That’s an estimable achievement and one worth pausing to commemorate.

#RIP to Le Roi du Crazy

~ Biographer Shawn Levy on Jerry Lewis on Facebook