Black Film Critics Circle 2010 Inaugural Awards

Best Picture
The Social Network

Best Director
Darren Aronofsky – Black Swan

Best Actor
Colin Firth – The King’s Speech
(tie) James Franco – 127 Hours

Best Actress
Natalie Portman – Black Swan

Best Supporting Actor
Christian Bale – The Fighter

Best Supporting Actress
Melissa Leo – The Fighter

Best Independent Film
Night Catches Us

Best Original Screenplay
Christopher Nolan – Inception

Best Adapted Screenplay
Aaron Sorkin – The Social Network

Best Documentary
Waiting For Superman

Best Foreign Film
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

Best Animated Film
Toy Story 3

Best Ensemble
The Social Network

Pioneer – Haile Gerima – As the independent producer, director, writer of “Teza”, Gerima has been recognized for sustaining African Diaspora culture and empowering disenfranchised populations through his highly artistic and provocative work. His commitment to speaking truth to power is depicted in a body of work from the seventies up to his ground-breaking film Sankofa of the nineties. Gerima is a visionary with an eye for promoting black culture in film in a positive and historical light.

Breakout Performance -Jaden Smith – Jaden is a rising star who is recognized for his excellent performance in the summer blockbuster remake “The Karate Kid.” With an unmistakable charisma and charm, an acting ability beyond his years, and commitment and dedication to the role, Smith was a scene stealer. There is no doubt that Smith has a bright future ahead of him.

Special Mention -Gareth Edwards – With his SF film “Monsters”, Edwards took an original and organic approach to cinema bringing the industry back to its roots of visual storytelling. Edwards’ creativity defies the trend of contrived narratives and reliance on big budgets and gimmicks and instead gives the audience rich stories and memorable characters. “Monsters” is a great look at how Sci-Fi is done right (human stories, not creature-features) by a Director who understands that less is more, with good visual effects employed economically to enhance the film – not define it.

BFCC’s Top Ten Picks
1. The Social Network
2. Inception
3. Black Swan
4. The Fighter
5. The Kids Are All Right, The Town (Tie)
7. Toy Story 3
8. The King’s Speech
9. Winter’s Bone
10. The Ghost Writer

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Black Film Critics Circle is a film critics organization dedicated to honoring excellence of professionals in the film industry in U.S. and World Cinema. The organization launched in 2010 to celebrate achievements in cinema, maintain the integrity of a true critics organization and advance a collective vision of journalists of the black Diaspora. BFCC’s mission is to acknowledge and honor the contributions by people of the black Diaspora in the film industry who work in front of and behind the camera while also welcoming promising new talent; Assist in the development of new talent in the field of entertainment journalism through educational opportunities, mentoring and strategic partnerships: Raise awareness of the significance of black film and black film history as a critical part of film culture and preservation

One Response to “Black Film Critics Circle 2010 Inaugural Awards”

  1. Troofire says:

    Interesting that “For Colored Girls” is not mentioned in any awards.

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“Yes, yes, yes. Now I am also the producer on Jean-Luc’s films, so I need to raise the money. Yes, there are two projects in preparation with the pretext of virtual reality. We are beginning with two approaches: we can either do or undo VR. Maybe we will undo it more than we do VR, because thinking about VR leads to the opposite of VR. Is there concrete imagination in virtual reality? For me, cinema is concrete imagination because it’s made with the real and uses it. VR, virtual reality, is totally the opposite of that, but it might be interesting to use this and then to destroy it. No, we’ll see, we’ll see. First, it’s just an idea of a beginning. There is a forest to cross, and we are just at the beginning of the forest. The first step is development. As they say in business, first there is development and research. We have to develop somehow an idea for the film; I won’t say a script, but to see what we can do with this system, and what we can undo with this system.”
~ Fabrice Aragno On Godard’s Next Projects

“Why put it in a box? This is the number one problem I have—by the way it’s a fair question, I’m not saying that—with this kind of festival situation is that there’s always this temptation to classify the movie immediately and if you look at it—and I’ve tried to warn my fellow jurors of this—directors and movie critics are the worst people to judge movies! Directors are always thinking, “I could do that.” Critics are always saying, “This part of the movie is like the 1947 version and this part…” And it’s like, “Fuck! Just watch the movie and try and absorb it and not compare it to some other fucking movie and put it in a box!” So I think the answer’s both and maybe neither, I don’t know. That’s for you to see and criticize me for or not.”
~ James Gray