Black Film Critics Circle 2010 Inaugural Awards

Best Picture
The Social Network

Best Director
Darren Aronofsky – Black Swan

Best Actor
Colin Firth – The King’s Speech
(tie) James Franco – 127 Hours

Best Actress
Natalie Portman – Black Swan

Best Supporting Actor
Christian Bale – The Fighter

Best Supporting Actress
Melissa Leo – The Fighter

Best Independent Film
Night Catches Us

Best Original Screenplay
Christopher Nolan – Inception

Best Adapted Screenplay
Aaron Sorkin – The Social Network

Best Documentary
Waiting For Superman

Best Foreign Film
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

Best Animated Film
Toy Story 3

Best Ensemble
The Social Network

Pioneer – Haile Gerima – As the independent producer, director, writer of “Teza”, Gerima has been recognized for sustaining African Diaspora culture and empowering disenfranchised populations through his highly artistic and provocative work. His commitment to speaking truth to power is depicted in a body of work from the seventies up to his ground-breaking film Sankofa of the nineties. Gerima is a visionary with an eye for promoting black culture in film in a positive and historical light.

Breakout Performance -Jaden Smith – Jaden is a rising star who is recognized for his excellent performance in the summer blockbuster remake “The Karate Kid.” With an unmistakable charisma and charm, an acting ability beyond his years, and commitment and dedication to the role, Smith was a scene stealer. There is no doubt that Smith has a bright future ahead of him.

Special Mention -Gareth Edwards – With his SF film “Monsters”, Edwards took an original and organic approach to cinema bringing the industry back to its roots of visual storytelling. Edwards’ creativity defies the trend of contrived narratives and reliance on big budgets and gimmicks and instead gives the audience rich stories and memorable characters. “Monsters” is a great look at how Sci-Fi is done right (human stories, not creature-features) by a Director who understands that less is more, with good visual effects employed economically to enhance the film – not define it.

BFCC’s Top Ten Picks
1. The Social Network
2. Inception
3. Black Swan
4. The Fighter
5. The Kids Are All Right, The Town (Tie)
7. Toy Story 3
8. The King’s Speech
9. Winter’s Bone
10. The Ghost Writer

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Black Film Critics Circle is a film critics organization dedicated to honoring excellence of professionals in the film industry in U.S. and World Cinema. The organization launched in 2010 to celebrate achievements in cinema, maintain the integrity of a true critics organization and advance a collective vision of journalists of the black Diaspora. BFCC’s mission is to acknowledge and honor the contributions by people of the black Diaspora in the film industry who work in front of and behind the camera while also welcoming promising new talent; Assist in the development of new talent in the field of entertainment journalism through educational opportunities, mentoring and strategic partnerships: Raise awareness of the significance of black film and black film history as a critical part of film culture and preservation

One Response to “Black Film Critics Circle 2010 Inaugural Awards”

  1. Troofire says:

    Interesting that “For Colored Girls” is not mentioned in any awards.

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Julian Schnabel: Years ago, I was down there with my cousin’s wife Corky. She was wild — she wore makeup on her legs, and she had a streak in her hair like Yvonne De Carlo in “The Munsters.” She liked to paint. I had overalls on with just a T-shirt and looked like whatever. We were trying to buy a bunch of supplies with my cousin Jesse’s credit card. They looked at the credit card, and then they looked at us and thought maybe we stole the card, so they called Jesse up. He was a doctor who became the head of trauma at St. Vincent’s. They said, “There’s somebody here with this credit card and we want to know if it belongs to you.”

He said, “Well, does the woman have dyed blonde hair and fake eyelashes and look like she stepped out of the backstage of some kind of silent movie, and is she with some guy who has wild hair and is kind of dressed like a bum?”

“Yeah, that’s them.”

“Yeah, that’s my cousin and my wife. It’s okay, they can charge it on my card.”
~ Julian Schnabel Remembers NYC’s Now-Shuttered Pearl Paint

MB Cool. I was really interested in the aerial photography from Enter the Void and how one could understand that conceptually as a POV, while in fact it’s more of an objective view of the city where the story takes place. So it’s an objective and subjective camera at the same time. I know that you’re interested in Kubrick. We’ve talked about that in the past because it’s something that you and I have in common—

GN You’re obsessed with Kubrick, too.

MB Does he still occupy your mind or was he more of an early influence?

GN He was more of an early influence. Kubrick has been my idol my whole life, my own “god.” I was six or seven years old when I saw 2001: A Space Odyssey, and I never felt such cinematic ecstasy. Maybe that’s what brought me to direct movies, to try to compete with that “wizard of Oz” behind the film. So then, years later, I tried to do something in that direction, like many other directors tried to do their own, you know, homage or remake or parody or whatever of 2001. I don’t know if you ever had that movie in mind for your own projects. But in my case, I don’t think about 2001 anymore now. That film was my first “trip” ever. And then I tried my best to reproduce on screen what some drug trips are like. But it’s very hard. For sure, moving images are a better medium than words, but it’s still very far from the real experience. I read that Kubrick said about Lynch’s Eraserhead, that he wished he had made that movie because it was the film he had seen that came closest to the language of nightmares.

Matthew Barney and Gaspar Noé