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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: Winter’s Bone, actor Jennifer Lawrence

9 Responses to “DP/30: Winter’s Bone, actor Jennifer Lawrence”

  1. Keil Shults says:

    Despite having read this website for years, I’ve never really gotten around to watching these DP interviews. But with my new job affording me lots of time alone in a room in front of a computer, I figured, “What the hell.”

    Anyway, interesting interview. I have yet to see Winter’s Bone, but apparently Netflix shipped it to me today, so I should be viewing it tomorrow evening. Very eager to see if the film and its newfound star are worth all this hubbub (I’m guessing they are).

    As for Lawrence herself…she seems to have many admirable qualities that appear to be lacking from many Hollywood starlets, but I suppose it’s also early in her career. Hopefully she won’t get seduced by the dark side. My heart still hasn’t recovered from realizing that Veronica Mars was only a fictional character, and the girl who played her seems intent on going against every witty, intelligent, sarcastic bone in her alter ego’s body.

  2. sanj says:

    that was fun – she got annoyed by your questions by the
    end…

    DP – time to get teen reporter to do teen actor interviews

  3. LexG says:

    “DP – time to get teen reporter to do teen actor interviews”

    Bullshit, time to get LEXG to do the teen ACTRESS interviews.

    MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM.

  4. t.holly says:

    29:50 Action in the bedroom, hilarious.

  5. NickF says:

    Good stuff sir. She has an un-corrupted view of Hollywood, maybe even naive at times. But that is nice to see every once in a while. Her personality is very likable.

    I finally saw Winter’s Bone over the weekend, and she most definitely deserves a best actress nomination. The competition will be fierce, but the performance is exceptional.

  6. LexG says:

    Is there anything more hypnotic than a young blonde woman?

    Answer: NO.

  7. Keil Shults says:

    Since she seems to love P.T. Anderson, I’ll be the first to suggest he cast her as the lead in a Rollergirl spin-off (no pun intended).

  8. Keil Shults says:

    Finally saw the film last night. I liked the movie well enough, but felt it was a bit overrated. I’d give it a solid B+, and am definitely thinking of removing it from my Top 10 Best Pic Nominee Predictions.

    As for her performance…I thought it was really good, especially given her age and relative inexperience. However, I didn’t find it quite as amazing or affecting as I had anticipated, and while I still think a nomination is possible, it seems unlikely that she could actually win.

    And finally, John Hawkes is indeed a badass.

  9. Chris Rasmussen says:

    A solid, inspiring interview with a sincere, professional, unaffected talent. Would that the audio recordist have smacked the interviewer the first of FAR too many times that he annoyingly pounded or scratched his mic…

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DP/30

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“When Bay keeps these absurd plot-gears spinning, he’s displaying his skill as a slick, professional entertainer. But then there are the images of motion—I hesitate to say, of things in motion, because it’s not clear how many things there are in the movie, instead of mere digital simulations of things. It doesn’t matter. What matters is that there’s a car chase through London, seen from the level of tires, that could have gone on for an hour, um, tirelessly. What matters is that the defenestrated Cade saves himself by leaping from drone to drone in midair like a frog skipping among lotus pads; that he and Vivian slide along the colossal, polished expanses of sharply tilting age-old fields of metal like luge Olympians. What matters is that, when this heroic duo find themselves thrust out into the void of inner space from a collapsing planet, it has a terrifyingly vast emptiness that Bay doesn’t dare hold for more than an instant lest he become the nightmare-master. What matters is that the enormous thing hurtling toward Earth is composed in a fanatical detail that would repay slow-motion viewing with near-geological patience. Bay has an authentic sense of the gigantic; beside the playful enormity of his Transformerized universe, the ostensibly heroic dimensions of Ridley Scott’s and Christopher Nolan’s massive visions seem like petulant vanities.”
~ Michael Bay Gives Richard Brody A Tingle

How do you see film evolving in this age of Netflix?

I thought the swing would be quicker and more violent. There have been two landmark moments in the history of French film. First in 1946, with the creation of the CNC under the aegis of Malraux. He saved French cinema by establishing the advance on receipts and support fund mechanisms. We’re all children of this political invention. Americans think that the State gives money to French films, but they’re wrong. Through this system, films fund themselves!

The other great turning point came by the hand of Jack Lang in the 1980s, after the creation of Canal+. While television was getting ready to become the nemesis of film, he created the decoder, and a specific broadcasting space between film and television, using new investments for film. That once again saved French film.

These political decisions are important. We’re once again facing big change. If our political masters don’t take control of the situation and new stakeholders like Netflix, Google and Amazon, we’re headed for disaster. We need to create obligations for Internet service providers. They can’t always be against film. They used to allow piracy, but now that they’ve become producers themselves, they’re starting to see things in a different light. This is a moment of transition, a strong political act needs to be put forward. And it can’t just be at national level, it has to happen at European level.

Filmmaker Cédric Klapisch