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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: Winter’s Bone, actor Jennifer Lawrence

9 Responses to “DP/30: Winter’s Bone, actor Jennifer Lawrence”

  1. Keil Shults says:

    Despite having read this website for years, I’ve never really gotten around to watching these DP interviews. But with my new job affording me lots of time alone in a room in front of a computer, I figured, “What the hell.”

    Anyway, interesting interview. I have yet to see Winter’s Bone, but apparently Netflix shipped it to me today, so I should be viewing it tomorrow evening. Very eager to see if the film and its newfound star are worth all this hubbub (I’m guessing they are).

    As for Lawrence herself…she seems to have many admirable qualities that appear to be lacking from many Hollywood starlets, but I suppose it’s also early in her career. Hopefully she won’t get seduced by the dark side. My heart still hasn’t recovered from realizing that Veronica Mars was only a fictional character, and the girl who played her seems intent on going against every witty, intelligent, sarcastic bone in her alter ego’s body.

  2. sanj says:

    that was fun – she got annoyed by your questions by the
    end…

    DP – time to get teen reporter to do teen actor interviews

  3. LexG says:

    “DP – time to get teen reporter to do teen actor interviews”

    Bullshit, time to get LEXG to do the teen ACTRESS interviews.

    MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM.

  4. t.holly says:

    29:50 Action in the bedroom, hilarious.

  5. NickF says:

    Good stuff sir. She has an un-corrupted view of Hollywood, maybe even naive at times. But that is nice to see every once in a while. Her personality is very likable.

    I finally saw Winter’s Bone over the weekend, and she most definitely deserves a best actress nomination. The competition will be fierce, but the performance is exceptional.

  6. LexG says:

    Is there anything more hypnotic than a young blonde woman?

    Answer: NO.

  7. Keil Shults says:

    Since she seems to love P.T. Anderson, I’ll be the first to suggest he cast her as the lead in a Rollergirl spin-off (no pun intended).

  8. Keil Shults says:

    Finally saw the film last night. I liked the movie well enough, but felt it was a bit overrated. I’d give it a solid B+, and am definitely thinking of removing it from my Top 10 Best Pic Nominee Predictions.

    As for her performance…I thought it was really good, especially given her age and relative inexperience. However, I didn’t find it quite as amazing or affecting as I had anticipated, and while I still think a nomination is possible, it seems unlikely that she could actually win.

    And finally, John Hawkes is indeed a badass.

  9. Chris Rasmussen says:

    A solid, inspiring interview with a sincere, professional, unaffected talent. Would that the audio recordist have smacked the interviewer the first of FAR too many times that he annoyingly pounded or scratched his mic…

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DP/30

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“I was 15 when I first watched Sally Hardesty escape into the back of a pickup truck, covered in blood and cackling like a goddamn witch. All of her friends were dead. She had been kidnapped, tortured and even forced to feed her own blood to her cannibalistic captors’ impossibly shriveled patriarch. Being new to the horror genre, I was sure she was going to die. It had been a few months since I survived a violent sexual assault, where I subsequently ran from my assailant, tripped, fell and fought like hell. I crawled home with bloody knees, makeup-stained cheeks and a new void in both my mind and heart. My sense of safety, my ability to trust others, my willingness to form new relationships and my love of spending time with people I cared about were all taken from me. It wasn’t until I found the original The Texas Chain Saw Massacre that something clicked. It was Sally’s strength, and her resilience. It was watching her survive blows to the head from a hammer. It was watching her break free from her bonds and burst through a glass window. It was watching her get back up after she’d been stabbed. It was watching her crawl into the back of a truck, laughing as it drove away from Leatherface. She was the last one to confront the killer, and live. I remember sitting in front of the TV and thinking, There I am. That’s me.”
~ Lauren Milici On “The Final Girl”

“‘Thriller’ enforced its own reality principle; it was there, part of the every commute, a serenade to every errand, a referent to every purchase, a fact of every life. You didn’t have to like it, you only had to acknowledge it. By July 6, 1984, when the Jacksons played the first show of their ‘Victory’ tour, in Kansas City, Missouri, Jacksonism had produced a system of commodification so complete that whatever and whoever was admitted to it instantly became a new commodity. People were no longer comsuming commodities as such things are conventionally understood (records, videos, posters, books, magazines, key rings, earrings necklaces pins buttons wigs voice-altering devices Pepsis t-shirts underwear hats scarves gloves jackets – and why were there no jeans called Bille Jeans?); they were consuming their own gestures of consumption. That is, they were consuming not a Tayloristic Michael Jackson, or any licensed facsimile, but themselves. Riding a Mobius strip of pure capitalism, that was the transubstantiation.”
~ Greil Marcus On Michael Jackson