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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

DP/30 Sneak Peek: Darren Aronofsky on The Wolverine

Next week, the full-length Aronofsky and Portman Black Swan DP/30s. But with the official announcement of the deal for Darren’s next movie, here’s this clip from the chat…

7 Responses to “DP/30 Sneak Peek: Darren Aronofsky on The Wolverine”

  1. LexG says:

    STACHE!!!! Awesome.

  2. actionman says:

    the sleazy porn star moustache is very bold. questionable and bold.

  3. Don R. Lewis says:

    I was JUST gonna log in to say that stache HA to go. He looks like the film critic/spy character Fassbender played in INGLORIOUS BASTARDS.

  4. NickF says:

    Darren is the best hire Fox could ever make.

  5. Keil Shults says:

    I suppose Aronofsky’s mustache could be the physical manifestation of his rebellious nature. If his choice in preferred film stock seems anachronistic, why shouldn’t his facial hair do the same? It is possible that Aronofsky’s grooming choices are part of a low-key strategy to subvert Hollywood — a follicle-fueled call to arms? Could his insistence on shaving the lower half of his face, but leaving the upper lip adorned with whiskers be his way of showing the film industry that he is above them?

    All this and more will be explored in my upcoming book, “Beards and Berets: An Illustrated History of Filmmaker Affectations.”

  6. Barry S. says:

    It’s phony and disingenuous for Aronofsky to claim the late Stuart Rosenberg as his “mentor.” The man was embarrassed to have Aronofsky as a student. After seeing Requiem For a Dream Rosenberg was famously quoted as saying, “Will that idiot ever grow up and make a film without his over-the-top performances and cheap visual gimmicks?”

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“I never accepted the term contrarian. I think that’s offensive, frankly. And my response to that is: if I’m a contrarian, what are other reviewers? What I strive to do is be a good critic, not somebody who simply accepts the product put in front of me. I guess it scares people to think that they don’t have any originality; that they don’t have the capacity to think for themselves.

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