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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

Black Swan, actor Natalie Portman

SPOILER WARNING: We discuss the ultimate scenes in the film in this conversation.

6 Responses to “Black Swan, actor Natalie Portman”

  1. Jessica says:

    Great interview with Miss Portman. She seems very thoughtful and lovely and oh so cute!

  2. Peter says:

    Since Lexg hasn’t commented yet, I will do the honors.

    LOOK AT HER!!!!!

    In all seriousness, she is wonderful in the movie. Actually, I really can’t think of a word(s) that can describe how good she is here. Performance of the year?

    Great interview.

  3. sanj says:

    this interview belongs on the dvd extras – you’ve got so many Black Swan interviews i figure all will be in the dvd?

    also saw Natalie on Dave Letterman – Natalie had 2 segments – the most interesting thing about that was Dave never mentioned any of the other actors / directors or any of the usual questions a movie like this gets.
    Dave thinks Natalie will win the Oscar …

  4. Bruce says:

    Just watched the interview, with Natalie. There seems to be intelligent life in planet Hollywood! She is well spoken, modest, and articulate. What a refreshig change from the usual.

  5. Margot Channing Tatum O'neal says:

    After seeing Black Swan and having concluded that (SPOILER ALERT!!!!!) Nina didn’t die, I had yet to find anyone who agreed with me.

    Nice to see you and the lovely Natalie Portman do.

    What an interesting film and what a great metaphor for womanhood. The Black Swan (woman) transformation is by far one of the most memorable scenes I’ve seen in film this year.

  6. amir says:

    sensytiv lovly girl

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DP/30

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“To be a critic is to be a workaholic. Workaholism is socially conditioned: viewed favourably by exploiters, it’s generally ruinous to a worker’s mental health. When T.S. Eliot said criticism was as inevitable as breathing, he failed to mention that, respiratory problems notwithstanding, breathing is easy. Criticism is reflexive before reflective: to formalise/industrialise an involuntary instinct requires time, effort and discipline. The reason we seek remuneration, as opposed to the self-hatred of being a scab, is because all labour should be waged…

“Criticism, so the cliché by now goes, is dying. None of the panel discussions on its death agony, however—including those in which I’ve formally participated—come at it from the wider perspective that the problem surely needs. They defend the ways in which criticism functions in relation to the industry and to the public, but they fail to contextualise these relationships as defined by ultimately rotten and self-harming imperatives.

“Criticism was a noble profession so long as only a few could practice it for money; when the field expands, as it has with a so-called ‘democratisation’ of our practice, those few lose their political power. Competition grows and markets are undercut: publications are naturally going to start paying less. Precarity is both cause and effect of a surplus workforce: the reason you’re only as good as your last article is because there are plenty of other folks who can write the next one in your place. The daily grind is: pitch, or perish.

B”ut criticism, so a counter-cliché goes, is not dying. An irony: this is an elite sport that is no longer elite in terms of who is able to practice it, but in economic terms it’s clutching to a perverse and outmoded hierarchical structure. It’s more meritocratic than ever, now: which is to say it isn’t meritocratic at all. That’s a paradox in bad need of a resolution…”

~ Michael Pattison Manifestoes Film Criticism

“It’s easy to forget when you’re reading a critic every single week or multiple times a week, that most of us who do this job, and have been doing it for a long time, understand that this is basically a parasitic profession. I don’t mean in the sense that we’re evil bloodsucking creatures, but we couldn’t exist if we didn’t have something to analyze. And I’m always conscious of that. So whether I like or don’t like a particular thing you do, my point of view is always that of an appreciator. I just like to be in the world that you create.”
~ Matt Zoller Seitz To Sam Esmail

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