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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

Black Swan, actor Natalie Portman

SPOILER WARNING: We discuss the ultimate scenes in the film in this conversation.

6 Responses to “Black Swan, actor Natalie Portman”

  1. Jessica says:

    Great interview with Miss Portman. She seems very thoughtful and lovely and oh so cute!

  2. Peter says:

    Since Lexg hasn’t commented yet, I will do the honors.

    LOOK AT HER!!!!!

    In all seriousness, she is wonderful in the movie. Actually, I really can’t think of a word(s) that can describe how good she is here. Performance of the year?

    Great interview.

  3. sanj says:

    this interview belongs on the dvd extras – you’ve got so many Black Swan interviews i figure all will be in the dvd?

    also saw Natalie on Dave Letterman – Natalie had 2 segments – the most interesting thing about that was Dave never mentioned any of the other actors / directors or any of the usual questions a movie like this gets.
    Dave thinks Natalie will win the Oscar …

  4. Bruce says:

    Just watched the interview, with Natalie. There seems to be intelligent life in planet Hollywood! She is well spoken, modest, and articulate. What a refreshig change from the usual.

  5. Margot Channing Tatum O'neal says:

    After seeing Black Swan and having concluded that (SPOILER ALERT!!!!!) Nina didn’t die, I had yet to find anyone who agreed with me.

    Nice to see you and the lovely Natalie Portman do.

    What an interesting film and what a great metaphor for womanhood. The Black Swan (woman) transformation is by far one of the most memorable scenes I’ve seen in film this year.

  6. amir says:

    sensytiv lovly girl

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DP/30

Quote Unquotesee all »

DEADLINE: How does a visualist feel about people watching your films on a phone or VOD?
REFN: It depends on what kind of movie you make. We had great success with Only God Forgives on multiple platforms in the U.S. Young people will decide how they see it, when they want to see it. Don’t try to fight it. Embrace it. That’s a wonderful opportunity. We’re at the most exciting time since the invention of the wheel, in terms of creativity because distribution and accessibility have changed everything. A camera is still a camera whether it’s digital or not; there’s still sound; an actor is an actor. Ninety-nine percent of what you do is going to be seen on a smart phone – I know this is the greatest thing ever made because it allows people to choose, watching what you do on this format or go into a theater and see it on a screen. That means more people than ever will see what I do, which is personally satisfying in terms of vanity. But you have to be able to adapt, to accept things in different order and length than we’re used to. We are in a very, very exciting time.
~ Nic Refn to Jen Yamato

DEADLINE: You mention Tarantino, who with Christopher Nolan and a few other giants, saved film stock from extinction. To him, showing a digital film in a theater is the equivalent of watching TV in public. Make an argument for why digital is a good film making canvas.
REFN: Costwise, it’s a very effective way for young people to start making movies. You can make your movie on an iPhone. It’s wonderful seeing how my own children use technology to enhance creativity. For me it’s a wonderful canvas. Sure, I love grain in film. I love celluloid. But I also like creativity. I like crayons, I like pencils, I like paint. It’s all relative. Technology is more inclusive. A hundred years ago when film was invented, it was an elitist club. Very few people got to make it, very few people controlled it and very few people owned it. A hundred years later, storytelling through images is everyone’s domain. It’s ultimate capitalism. There are no rules, and no barriers and no Hays Code. Where does this go in another hundred years? I don’t know but I would love to see it.
~ Nic Refn To Jen Yamato