Z
MCN Blogs

By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

Black Swan, actor Natalie Portman

SPOILER WARNING: We discuss the ultimate scenes in the film in this conversation.

6 Responses to “Black Swan, actor Natalie Portman”

  1. Jessica says:

    Great interview with Miss Portman. She seems very thoughtful and lovely and oh so cute!

  2. Peter says:

    Since Lexg hasn’t commented yet, I will do the honors.

    LOOK AT HER!!!!!

    In all seriousness, she is wonderful in the movie. Actually, I really can’t think of a word(s) that can describe how good she is here. Performance of the year?

    Great interview.

  3. sanj says:

    this interview belongs on the dvd extras – you’ve got so many Black Swan interviews i figure all will be in the dvd?

    also saw Natalie on Dave Letterman – Natalie had 2 segments – the most interesting thing about that was Dave never mentioned any of the other actors / directors or any of the usual questions a movie like this gets.
    Dave thinks Natalie will win the Oscar …

  4. Bruce says:

    Just watched the interview, with Natalie. There seems to be intelligent life in planet Hollywood! She is well spoken, modest, and articulate. What a refreshig change from the usual.

  5. Margot Channing Tatum O'neal says:

    After seeing Black Swan and having concluded that (SPOILER ALERT!!!!!) Nina didn’t die, I had yet to find anyone who agreed with me.

    Nice to see you and the lovely Natalie Portman do.

    What an interesting film and what a great metaphor for womanhood. The Black Swan (woman) transformation is by far one of the most memorable scenes I’ve seen in film this year.

  6. amir says:

    sensytiv lovly girl

Leave a Reply

DP/30

Z

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Chad Harbach spent ten years writing his novel. It was his avocation, for which he was paid nothing, with no guarantee he’d ever be paid anything, while he supported himself doing freelance work, for which I don’t think he ever made $30,000 a year. I sold his book for an advance that equated to $65,000 a year—before taxes and commission—for each of the years of work he’d put in. The law schools in this country churn out first-year associates at white-shoe firms that pay them $250,000 a year, when they’re twenty-five years of age, to sit at a desk doing meaningless bullshit to grease the wheels of the corporatocracy, and people get upset about an excellent author getting $65,000 a year? Give me a fucking break.”
~ Book Agent Chris Parris-Lamb On The State Of The Publishing Industry

INTERVIEWER
Do you think this anxiety of yours has something to do with being a woman? Do you have to work harder than a male writer, just to create work that isn’t dismissed as being “for women”? Is there a difference between male and female writing?

FERRANTE
I’ll answer with my own story. As a girl—twelve, thirteen years old—I was absolutely certain that a good book had to have a man as its hero, and that depressed me. That phase ended after a couple of years. At fifteen I began to write stories about brave girls who were in serious trouble. But the idea remained—indeed, it grew stronger—that the greatest narrators were men and that one had to learn to narrate like them. I devoured books at that age, and there’s no getting around it, my models were masculine. So even when I wrote stories about girls, I wanted to give the heroine a wealth of experiences, a freedom, a determination that I tried to imitate from the great novels written by men. I didn’t want to write like Madame de La Fayette or Jane Austen or the Brontës—at the time I knew very little about contemporary literature—but like Defoe or Fielding or Flaubert or Tolstoy or Dostoyevsky or even Hugo. While the models offered by women novelists were few and seemed to me for the most part thin, those of male novelists were numerous and almost always dazzling. That phase lasted a long time, until I was in my early twenties, and it left profound effects.
~ Elena Ferrante, Paris Review Art Of Fiction No. 228

Z Z