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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

Black Swan, actor Natalie Portman

SPOILER WARNING: We discuss the ultimate scenes in the film in this conversation.

6 Responses to “Black Swan, actor Natalie Portman”

  1. Jessica says:

    Great interview with Miss Portman. She seems very thoughtful and lovely and oh so cute!

  2. Peter says:

    Since Lexg hasn’t commented yet, I will do the honors.

    LOOK AT HER!!!!!

    In all seriousness, she is wonderful in the movie. Actually, I really can’t think of a word(s) that can describe how good she is here. Performance of the year?

    Great interview.

  3. sanj says:

    this interview belongs on the dvd extras – you’ve got so many Black Swan interviews i figure all will be in the dvd?

    also saw Natalie on Dave Letterman – Natalie had 2 segments – the most interesting thing about that was Dave never mentioned any of the other actors / directors or any of the usual questions a movie like this gets.
    Dave thinks Natalie will win the Oscar …

  4. Bruce says:

    Just watched the interview, with Natalie. There seems to be intelligent life in planet Hollywood! She is well spoken, modest, and articulate. What a refreshig change from the usual.

  5. Margot Channing Tatum O'neal says:

    After seeing Black Swan and having concluded that (SPOILER ALERT!!!!!) Nina didn’t die, I had yet to find anyone who agreed with me.

    Nice to see you and the lovely Natalie Portman do.

    What an interesting film and what a great metaphor for womanhood. The Black Swan (woman) transformation is by far one of the most memorable scenes I’ve seen in film this year.

  6. amir says:

    sensytiv lovly girl

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DP/30

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“There are critics who see their job as to be on the side of the artist, or in a state of imaginative sympathy or alliance with the artist. I think it’s important for a critic to be populist in the sense that we’re on the side of the public. I think one of the reasons is, frankly, capitalism. Whether you’re talking about restaurants or you’re talking about movies, you’re talking about large-scale commercial enterprises that are trying to sell themselves and market themselves and publicize themselves. A critic is, in a way, offering consumer advice. I think it’s very, very important in a time where everything is commercialized, commodified, and branded, where advertising is constantly bleeding into other forms of discourse, for there to be an independent voice kind of speaking to—and to some extent on behalf of—the public.”
~ A. O. Scott On One Role Of The Critic

“Every night, we’d sit and talk for a long, long time and talk about the process and I knew he was very, very intrigued about what could be happening. Then of course, one of the fascinating things he told me about was how he had readers who were reading for him that never knew it was Stanley Kubrick. So if he heard of a novel, he would send it out to people. I think he did it through newspaper ads at the time. And he would send it out to people and ask for a kind of synopsis or a critique of the novel. And he would read those. And it was done anonymously. But he said there were housewives and there were barristers and all sorts of people doing that. And I thought, yeah, that’s a really good way to open up the possibilities. Because otherwise, you’re randomly looking, walking through a bookstore or an airport. I said, “How many people are doing this?” It was about 30 people.”
~ George Miller’s Conversations With Kubrick