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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

Black Swan, actor Mila Kunis

13 Responses to “Black Swan, actor Mila Kunis”

  1. The Pope says:

    I can’t believe I’m typing these words while watching Mila Kunis in interview… but nice background! Sincerely, it all works. EVERY THING.

  2. LexG says:

    Seriously. Was it intentional, or just fortuitous, that the background is identical to the color and production design of the auditorium from the movie?

    The usual “look at her!!!” antics go without saying, but KUNIS POWER. Best Supporting Actress nod, please.

  3. Peter says:

    So LexG, does this mean you have seen Black Swan?

  4. sanj says:

    this dp/30 reminded me of Eva Mendes dp/30

    but you could have spent 5 extra minutes talking about Family Guy / Book of Eli / Forgetting Sarah Marshall and
    a few lesser known films

  5. LexG says:

    Peter…

    That’s affirmative. Portman = best female performance since Hathaway in “Rachel Getting Married”… but Kunis, Hershey and almost especially Cassel should be hearing praises, too.

    But, yeah, I was really struck by that grainy black-gray Libatique photography combined with the production design; In a lot of ways it reminded me of the inky, grainy texture of PI, only in color. Interesting that they have the background to match in this interview.

  6. sanj says:

    DP – Did Mila not want to talk about Family Guy or did you not watch enough episodes of the series to talk about it ..

    thousands of clips of Family Guy on Youtube and other
    video sites makes it super popular and something not discussed at all.

  7. LexG says:

    Sanj’s recurring fascination with the DPs as his personal request line = awesome.

  8. Peter says:

    So no praise for Winona? I know she is only in 2-3 scenes but she is very effective in those. Right now, Black Swan and Carlos are the best movie in 2010. My immediate reaction after watching Black Swan was: I got to see it again.

  9. sanj says:

    Its not my personal request line … Family Guy has 18-20
    episodes per season … her voiceover work is just as great as her acting work. Yes i know this interview was for Black Swan but a few minutes talking about voice work would have been nice.

    Maybe Mila has to be in a Pixar or Dreamworks film to be considered serious ?

    the dp/30 with Dennis Hopper – Dennis spent maybe 5 minutes or more talking about his artwork.

  10. Triple Option says:

    Well, I’m impressed that your public plea for screening passes worked for you, Lex. For all the times you exclaimed you needed get laid or you would explode, did anyone ever once come through for you? You don’t have to name names or even if the person was an actress or even that attractive, I just want to know if you got people?

    I’m not going to ask for anything…yet, but it’s nice to know I may have options.

    I don’t know, maybe I don’t. Will anybody hook me up w/anything???

  11. Gus says:

    Lex your ranting was the highlight of the e-week for me. Plz to be detailing your getting to finally see this thing.

  12. LexG says:

    Peter: Oh, yeah… Winona rules, too, though her role is smaller than the four I mentioned. That said, LOVED her runny mascara in one scene, AND she gets maybe the movie’s freakiest scene.

  13. Santosh says:

    I’m not easily imsepsred. . . but that’s impressing me! :)

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DP/30

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“The core fear is what can happen to you, personally. Your body. That’s what horror films deal with, precisely. We are a very thin skin wrapped around a pumping heart and guts. At any given moment it can come down to that, be it diseases, or somebody’s assault, or war, or a car wreck. You could be reduced to the simple laws of physics and your body’s vulnerability. The edged weapon is the penultimate weapon to disclose that reality to you.”
~ Wes Craven, 1996, promoting Scream

MAMET
Well, that, to me, is always the trick of dramaturgy; theoretically, perfectly, what one wants to do is put the protagonist and the audience in exactly the same position. The main question in drama, the way I was taught, is always what does the protagonist want. That’s what drama is. It comes down to that. It’s not about theme, it’s not about ideas, it’s not about setting, but what the protagonist wants. What gives rise to the drama, what is the precipitating event, and how, at the end of the play, do we see that event culminated? Do we see the protagonist’s wishes fulfilled or absolutely frustrated? That’s the structure of drama. You break it down into three acts.

INTERVIEWER
Does this explain why your plays have so little exposition?

MAMET
Yes. People only speak to get something. If I say, Let me tell you a few things about myself, already your defenses go up; you go, Look, I wonder what he wants from me, because no one ever speaks except to obtain an objective. That’s the only reason anyone ever opens their mouth, onstage or offstage. They may use a language that seems revealing, but if so, it’s just coincidence, because what they’re trying to do is accomplish an objective… The question is where does the dramatist have to lead you? Answer: the place where he or she thinks the audience needs to be led. But what does the character think? Does the character need to convey that information? If the answer is no, then you’d better cut it out, because you aren’t putting the audience in the same position with the protagonist. You’re saying, in effect, Let’s stop the play. That’s what the narration is doing—stopping the play… It’s action, as Aristotle said. That’s all that it is—exactly what the person does. It’s not what they “think,” because we don’t know what they think. It’s not what they say. It’s what they do, what they’re physically trying to accomplish on the stage. Which is exactly the same way we understand a person’s character in life—not by what they say, but by what they do. Say someone came up to you and said, I’m glad to be your neighbor because I’m a very honest man. That’s my character. I’m honest, I like to do things, I’m forthright, I like to be clear about everything, I like to be concise. Well, you really don’t know anything about that guy’s character. Or the person is onstage, and the playwright has him or her make those same claims in several subtle or not-so-subtle ways, the audience will say, Oh yes, I understand their character now; now I understand that they are a character. But in fact you don’t understand anything. You just understand that they’re jabbering to try to convince you of something.
~ David Mamet

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