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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Let Me In Gets 2 Unique Raves

c/o Overture…

FROM STEPHEN KING:
LET ME IN is a genre-busting triumph. Not just a horror film, but the best American horror film in the last 20 years. Whether you’re a teenager or a film-lover in your 50s, you’ll be knocked out. Rush to it now. You can thank me later.

FROM JOHN AJVIDE LINDQVIST:
I might just be the luckiest writer alive.
To have not only one, but two excellent versions of my debut novel done for the screen feels unreal.
Let the right one in is a great Swedish movie.
Let me in is a great American movie.
There are notable similarities and the spirit of Tomas Alfredson is present. But Let me in puts the emotional pressure in different places and stands firmly on its own legs. Like the Swedish movie it made me cry, but not at the same points.
Let me in is a dark and violent love story, a beautiful piece of cinema and a respectful rendering of my novel for which I am grateful. Again.

10 Responses to “Let Me In Gets 2 Unique Raves”

  1. leahnz says:

    high praise indeed from lindqvist (and SK tho as much as i love him he’s a bit off his rocker in the taste stakes, at least when it comes to matching my own)

  2. LexG says:

    Seriously.

    The four best movies I’ve seen this year:

    ENTER THE VOID, INCEPTION, LET ME IN, NEVER LET ME GO.

  3. Helene says:

    They’re both spot on reviews. It was a really great movie-I kept waiting for another great American horror film. The vampire myth wasn’t this teenager goth stuff it was sadness at what she was and how alone she was running parallel to the loneliness Owen felt.

  4. Keil Shults says:

    I’ve been telling myself I can just wait and rent this on Blu-ray in a few months, but these two blurbs may have inspired me to say “to hell with it” and go this weekend. Plus, I feel bad that the film’s doing so poorly at the box office. Maybe the poster should have read “From the Industry That Brought You Twilight.”

  5. rossers says:

    with you on “enter the void” lex. is this film gaining traction with american audiences at all?

  6. Lee Cushing says:

    The only problem with these reviews and comments is that it is NOT an American movie. It is made by Hammer, a British production company.

  7. yancyskancy says:

    I don’t know exactly what Hammer’s role was, but it’s not a big stretch to call a film with an American director, an American cast and an American setting (entirely shot in America) an American film. Even imdb lists both the UK and the US as the film’s “country of origin,” which reflects the financing realities. Good on Hammer for putting up some money, but I doubt that even they think this is a British film. The username “Lee Cushing” suggests you will not agree. :)

  8. Lee Cushing says:

    Let’s look at the facts.

    1. Pretty much all of the Hammer movies made since 1934 were heavily funded from American and are still considered British.

    2. Many of the films produced by Hammer since 1934 used American based actors in lead roles – Actors like Bette Davis, Bela Lugosi, Cybill Shepherd, Stephanie Powers, Elliott Gould and many others.

    3. There are plenty of American movies that were not filmed in America with all or the majority of cast members non-American.

    4. There was reportedly far less American funding for this than there was for past Hammer movies.

    5. The username Lee Cushing is the name I write under.

  9. AndrewB says:

    Let the right one in (original version) was a mesmorising beautiful intelligent film. When I heard a US remake was on the cards I was dreading it… But it sounds like it has being handled with the same quality n craftsmanship! What a shame it’s not doing well at the box office … Maybe it’s too clever, no car chase or gun fights!!!
    I hope the US viewers get to see what intelligent horror should be like.
    Watch the original first mind you!
    Andy

  10. The Master says:

    Hi Folks

    One point regarding past and present hammer films – at least in the 50′s, 60,s and 70′s hammer made their own films – now they are only putting money up – the film was actually made by Overture films and not hammer – I believe this is just De Mol buying the hammer name and adding it to a horror film – hammer are gone and finished – this is just a business deal!

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