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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Kickstater Delivers For An Indie

So, a project called Blue Like Jazz went after $125,000 and has pledges of $345,992 via Kickstarter, averaging $77 a pledge.

Are we witnessing history?

his-to-ry from Save Blue Like Jazz on Vimeo.

7 Responses to “Kickstater Delivers For An Indie”

  1. sloanish says:

    I have a feeling this is more a Christian event than anything else, much like when everyone is surprised when a Kirk Cameron movie does business. There are a bunch of small docs in the $20,000 range that seem to be more of the norm. It’s not a bad venue for an artist for a following though — you aren’t paying the investors anything once money starts rolling in.

  2. Jeffrey Boam's Doctor says:

    That’s some good faith money right there.

    They claim it’s the first film to be solely funded by crowd sourcing. This is not true. Did they forget they have another major investor who out up bulk of the money. It sounds as exciting as the time I made a low budget version of the Cellestine Prophecy for $125,000.

    The success rate on Kickstarter has dropped considerably. Too many damn hands being put on these days. Go get a real job you lazy bums.

    Like my pappy always said.. ditches need to be dug boy.

  3. anghus says:

    so embarassing. i guess if you have no dignity, this is the way to go. me, i’d rather not beg online for funding.

  4. Don R. Lewis says:

    DAYUM! That’s impressive. But yeah, there’s got to be something bigger than just a bunch of randoms handing out that kind of money. I just googled Steve Taylor and he’s a cult type musician so that probably helped. Plus, the book and author.

    When I did my crowd sourcing thing I got $4000 and was pretty blown away by that alone. Alot of people I never would have thought would help did and then people who I was sure WOULD help, didn’t. Crowdsourcing is a weird animal for sure. Over at Film Threat, we’re doing a weekly “Film Threat In Progress” piece where we promote a crowdsourced movie. Not sure if it helps though, sure can’t hurt.

    And anghus- yes, you should definitely not go the crowdsourcing way. Just sit home and bitch on message boards instead of attemtping to make ahything. ;-)

  5. eric n says:

    This should be interesting. I’m familiar with both books mentioned in the video–the second one chronicles the writing of the screenplay. Although I obviously haven’t read the screenplay, the people writing it certainly know their stuff. So, in theory, this has potential to distinguish itself from the Kirk Cameron Christian crowd who wouldn’t know what makes for a powerful story..well, you know what I mean.

  6. anghus says:

    Don, you work for Film Threat. So i understand your ignorance. I could spend a paragraph or 2 correcting you and your ‘just sit around the house’ kneejerk response i’m sure your famous for over at a website that i wasn’t certain still existed until now. but why bother.

  7. Don R. Lewis says:

    Nah, I have a regular job, I just write there. And troll for money to make documentaries. Film Threat’s been around for 25 years dude. Must be doing something right.

    Also, I meant to be snippy last post, but I apologize now. I could have been nicer/clearer, sorry about that. I think crowdsourcing can be a smart way to go. People seem to want to help out artists (filmmakers and muscians especially from my POV) and always ask me how they can help. I always feel weird just saying “gimmie $100!” so Indie Go-Go was a more “professional” way to say that and it gave them a way. But then again, it seems to be realllllly overplayed now and all these projects are kind of flooding the market.

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