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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Exit Through The Gift Shop, producer Jaimie D’ Cruz, editor Chris King

14 Responses to “Exit Through The Gift Shop, producer Jaimie D’ Cruz, editor Chris King”

  1. t.holly says:

    Let’s see if they answer my question in this interview, namely, the name of Thierry’s successful thrift shop the film made such a big deal about for making it possible for Thierry to finance his doc in the first place. Never been ID’ed — not in the film, not on the internet, nowhere. Why?

  2. t.holly says:

    And then, amazingly, he broke his ankle (BOGUSLY); they even got *authentic* x-rays nicely edited into the story. [No, they didn't mention that, yet.]

  3. IOv3 says:

    Hey T.holly! How have the last four years treated you?

  4. t.holly says:

    Thierry is cured! He doesn’t film anymore. (Guess he filmed all the time, but didn’t film much in his very successful L.A. thrift store or any store signage, though I think I did see Beck in the tiny bit of unidentified footage of Thierry in the store used in the doc.)

  5. t.holly says:

    IOv3, tired, overworked and obsessed.

  6. t.holly says:

    OK, so Banksy wanted the complete cut of Thierry’s film REMOTE CONTROL as an extra on the DVD. There will be an edited version of it. If the thrift shop exists, maybe it’ll be revealed. Enter through the gift shop, exit through the art show.

  7. West says:

    The World of Vintage T-Shirts
    7701 Melrose Ave
    Los Angeles, CA 90046

    Took me 5 seconds on Google to find the address

  8. t.holly says:

    Thanks West for the lead, the real MBW starts to stand up from this resume. http://www.linkedin.com/in/dvjdust

    New Media Artist
    MBW (Media Production industry)
    September 2001 — February 2010 (8 years 6 months)

    Mr Brainwash (aka) Thierry Guetta was my benefactor, my landlord, my boss, and my best friend for over a decade… a documentary film by Banksy originally conceived and shot by Thierry and formally a 3E Films production for which Thierry and I where partners.

    For over a decade we worked on myriad of advertising campaigns for people like Christian Audiger, Ed Hardy, Von Dutch, and Swissa Miller to name a few.

    Media Consultant
    TMP Enterprises LLC
    (Privately Held; Online Media industry)
    September 2001 — December 2004 (3 years 4 months)

    TMP Enterprises stands for Thierry, Marco, and Patrick Guetta a Licensing Apparel and Real-estate company. My responsibilities included but not limited to Electronic Pre-Press, Leasing Agent, Closed Circuit Surveillance Systems, Fashion and Apparel Design.

    Some clients included Too Cute, World Of Vintage T-Shirts, Bright Pink Mickey, Harvey Entertainment, Vogue Trimmings, Aztecha Productions, Blue Holdings, Disney, and Warner Brothers.

  9. Mrs Brainwash says:

    The guy on the right is Banksy.

  10. Mr T says:

    I kinda believe Mrs Brainwash. This guy is Banksy!

    1. Chris King is not credited. Just checked the film’s ending credits.

    2. At 6’30” / 7’00″ he really talks as if he was Banksy.

    3. The way he moves his hands is very similar to the movie interviews.

  11. Adam says:

    @ Mr T: Isn’t Chris King the ginger guy on the left in all black? I agree that he isn’t credited, but I think the guy speaking at 6:30 is Jaimie.

  12. dust says:

    haha. internet sleuths. actually the store in the film was on the 800 block of la brea / melrose. thierry re financed his home in order to come up with the equity to make the film possible.

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CATHERINE LACEY: Do you think that your writer DNA was sort of shaped by how your family was displaced by the Nazi regime before you were born?
RENATA ADLER: It’s funny that you should mention that because I think it affects a lot else, specifically being a refugee. I wasn’t born there. I didn’t experience any of it. But they were refugees. So then I was thinking of this business of being a refugee, no matter in what sense.

Prenatal refugee.
Prenatal refugee and actually postnatal refugee. And I thought there are probably things in common between being a child and being a refugee and being an anthropologist.

It gives you a sense of curiosity.
But also a complete displacement. You’ve got to read the situation. You’re the new kid in school all the time. But I wasn’t aware of it then. I’m aware of it now because language affects you differently, or not. But I used to talk to Mike Nichols about it because he was a refugee. Do you envision an audience when you write? Do you envision a particular person? 

No.
Every once in a while I think: Now, what would Mike say to that?

There’s that idea that when you’re blocked, you can always just write as if it was a letter to one specific person.
Oh, that’s good. That’s a wonderful idea. Mine is more in terms of criticism. If someone was to say, “I know what that is. Do you really want to do that?” But anyway, about Mike and his attitude toward language, I remember him saying—it was a question of whether something written was fresh or not—and he would ask, “Why not smell it?” Which, from an English speaker’s point of view, is hysterical.

~ Renata Adler and Catherine Lacey In Conversation 

“Oh it was just hellish. This is the worst thing that ever happened to me. It would be stupid for me to say that I didn’t know what I was getting into. It has taken me five years to decide on a first film and I always held out for something like this. The lesson to be learned is that you can’t take on an enterprise of this size and scope if you don’t have a movie like The Terminator or Jaws behind you. Because when everybody’s wringing their handkerchiefs and sweating and puking blood over the money, it’s very nice to be able to say, ‘This is the guy who directed the biggest grossing movie of all time, sit down, shut up and feel lucky that you’ve got him.’ It’s another thing when you are there and you’re going ‘Trust me, this is really what I believe in,’ and they turn round and say ‘Well, who the hell is this guy?’ If I make ten shitty movies, I’ll deserve the flak and if I go on to make 10 great ones, this’ll probably be looked upon as my first bungled masterpiece.”
~ David Fincher, 1992

 

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