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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Exit Through The Gift Shop, producer Jaimie D’ Cruz, editor Chris King

15 Responses to “Exit Through The Gift Shop, producer Jaimie D’ Cruz, editor Chris King”

  1. t.holly says:

    Let’s see if they answer my question in this interview, namely, the name of Thierry’s successful thrift shop the film made such a big deal about for making it possible for Thierry to finance his doc in the first place. Never been ID’ed — not in the film, not on the internet, nowhere. Why?

  2. t.holly says:

    And then, amazingly, he broke his ankle (BOGUSLY); they even got *authentic* x-rays nicely edited into the story. [No, they didn’t mention that, yet.]

  3. IOv3 says:

    Hey T.holly! How have the last four years treated you?

  4. t.holly says:

    Thierry is cured! He doesn’t film anymore. (Guess he filmed all the time, but didn’t film much in his very successful L.A. thrift store or any store signage, though I think I did see Beck in the tiny bit of unidentified footage of Thierry in the store used in the doc.)

  5. t.holly says:

    IOv3, tired, overworked and obsessed.

  6. t.holly says:

    OK, so Banksy wanted the complete cut of Thierry’s film REMOTE CONTROL as an extra on the DVD. There will be an edited version of it. If the thrift shop exists, maybe it’ll be revealed. Enter through the gift shop, exit through the art show.

  7. West says:

    The World of Vintage T-Shirts
    7701 Melrose Ave
    Los Angeles, CA 90046

    Took me 5 seconds on Google to find the address

  8. t.holly says:

    Thanks West for the lead, the real MBW starts to stand up from this resume. http://www.linkedin.com/in/dvjdust

    New Media Artist
    MBW (Media Production industry)
    September 2001 — February 2010 (8 years 6 months)

    Mr Brainwash (aka) Thierry Guetta was my benefactor, my landlord, my boss, and my best friend for over a decade… a documentary film by Banksy originally conceived and shot by Thierry and formally a 3E Films production for which Thierry and I where partners.

    For over a decade we worked on myriad of advertising campaigns for people like Christian Audiger, Ed Hardy, Von Dutch, and Swissa Miller to name a few.

    Media Consultant
    TMP Enterprises LLC
    (Privately Held; Online Media industry)
    September 2001 — December 2004 (3 years 4 months)

    TMP Enterprises stands for Thierry, Marco, and Patrick Guetta a Licensing Apparel and Real-estate company. My responsibilities included but not limited to Electronic Pre-Press, Leasing Agent, Closed Circuit Surveillance Systems, Fashion and Apparel Design.

    Some clients included Too Cute, World Of Vintage T-Shirts, Bright Pink Mickey, Harvey Entertainment, Vogue Trimmings, Aztecha Productions, Blue Holdings, Disney, and Warner Brothers.

  9. Mrs Brainwash says:

    The guy on the right is Banksy.

  10. Mr T says:

    I kinda believe Mrs Brainwash. This guy is Banksy!

    1. Chris King is not credited. Just checked the film’s ending credits.

    2. At 6’30” / 7’00” he really talks as if he was Banksy.

    3. The way he moves his hands is very similar to the movie interviews.

  11. Adam says:

    @ Mr T: Isn’t Chris King the ginger guy on the left in all black? I agree that he isn’t credited, but I think the guy speaking at 6:30 is Jaimie.

  12. dust says:

    haha. internet sleuths. actually the store in the film was on the 800 block of la brea / melrose. thierry re financed his home in order to come up with the equity to make the film possible.

  13. matt crawford says:

    Jaimie d’cruz is banksy same bracelet in this interview and exit through gift shop

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Dear Irene Cho, I will miss your energy and passion; your optimism and joy; your kindness towards friends, colleagues, strangers, struggling filmmakers, or anyone who randomly crossed your path and needed a hand. My brothers and I have long considered you another sibling in our family. Our holiday photos – both western and eastern – have you among all the cousins, in-laws, and kids… in the snow, sun, opening presents, at large dinner gatherings, playing Monopoly, breaking out pomegranate seeds and teaching us all how to dance Gangnam style. Your friendship and loyalty meant a great deal to me: you were the loudest cheerleader when I experienced victories and you were always ready with sushi when I had disappointments. You had endless crazy ideas which always seemed impossible but you would will them into existence. (Like that time you called me and suggested that we host a brunch for newly elected mayor of LA, Eric Garcetti because “he is going to president one day.” We didn’t have enough time or funding, of course, only your desire to do it. So you did, and I followed.) You created The Daily Buzz from nothing and it survived on your steam in spite of many setbacks because you believed in a platform for emerging filmmakers from all nations. Most of all, you were a wonderful mother to your son, Ethan, a devoted wife to your husband, and a wonderful sibling and daughter to your family. We will all miss how your wonderful smile and energy lit up the room and our lives. Rest in peace, Irene.
~ Rose Kuo Remembers Irene Cho on Facebook

“You know, I was never a critic. I never considered myself as a film critic. I started doing short films, writing screenplays and then for awhile, for a few years I wrote some film theory, including some film criticism because I had to, but I was never… I never had the desire to be a film critic. I never envisioned myself as a film critic, but I did that at a period of my life when I thought I kind of needed to understand things about cinema, understand things about film theory, understand the world map of cinema, and writing about movies gave me that, and also the opportunity to meet filmmakers I admired.

“To me, it was the best possible film school. The way it changed my perspective I suppose is that I believe in this connection between theory and practice. I think that you also make movies with ideas and you need to have ideas about filmmaking to achieve whatever you’re trying to achieve through your movies, but then I started making features in 1986 — a while ago — and I left all that behind.

“For the last three decades I’ve been making movies, I’ve been living, I’ve been observing the world. You become a different person, so basically my perspective on the world in general is very different and I hope that with every movie I make a step forward. I kind of hope I’m a better person, and hopefully a better filmmaker and hopefully try to… It’s very hard for me to go back to a different time when I would have different values in my relationship to filmmaking. I had a stiffer notion of cinema.”
~ Olivier Assayas