By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

CHICAGO FESTIVAL ANNOUNCES AUDIENCE CHOICE AWARDS

Feature film TRUST and documentary LOUDER THAN A BOMB share 2010 Audience Choice Award

CHICAGO, October 22, 2010 – The 46th Chicago International Film Festival proudly announces the Audience Choice Awards, presented by Buick Regal, and the juried Chicago Award. Audiences received ballots at every public screening during the two-week Festival to rank films on a five-point scale. Votes are tallied and weighted based on attendance so each film has an equal opportunity to win the award.

Audience Choice Award, presented by Buick Regal
LOUDER THAN A BOMB (USA)

Who ever said poetry was boring? Four teams of supremely talented Chicago high school students harness the ecstatic power of words as they prepare to compete in the world’s largest youth poetry slam right here in Chicago. The film also received the Chicago Award, Special Jury Prize. Directors: Greg Jacobs and Jon Siskel

TRUST (USA)
After carefree teenager Anna’s life is shattered by an online sexual predator, her parents (Clive Owen, Catherine Keener) struggle to help her pick up the pieces. As anger and disbelief drive her father’s desire for revenge, Anna is left to contend with her feelings of guilt and shame. Commanding performances by an ensemble cast drive this fiercely honest look at the devastating aftermath of rape. Lilana Liberato was awarded the Festival’s Silver Hugo for Best Actress (photo attached). Director: David Schwimmer

Audience Choice Award – The Human Condition

The Audience Choice Award in our 60-second film competition The Human Condition goes to BOIL, directed by Chicagoan Darren Davidson. BOIL is a comedy about the importance of taking action.
Chicago Award
Designed to honor the best film from the Festival’s Illinois[e]makers program of short, feature, and documentary films, the Chicago Award goes to TONY & JANINA’S AMERICAN WEDDING, a heart-wrenching film that puts a very human face on a current and painful political issue by intimately and expertly telling the story of one family’s American Dream-turned-nightmare as they are torn apart by a flawed U.S. immigration system. Director: Ruth Leitman

The Special Jury Prize goes to LOUDER THAN A BOMB, a meticulously crafted and inspiring film that celebrates with vitality and good spirit a spectrum of American youth—Chicago youth to be exact—at their most creative.

The Chicago Award jury consisted of local filmmakers James Choi, Emily Hart, and Dan Rybicky.

Led by Presenting Partner, Columbia College Chicago, the 46th Chicago International Film Festival’s sponsors to date include: Premiere Partners – American Airlines, Buick; Producing Partners- Stella Artois, DePaul University, AMC Theaters; Major Partners – Allstate, WBBM and theWit as the returning Headquarters Hotel.

ABOUT CINEMA/CHICAGO

Cinema/Chicago is a not-for-profit cultural and educational organization dedicated to encouraging better understanding between cultures and to making a positive contribution to the art form of the moving image. The Chicago International Film Festival is part of the year-round programs presented by Cinema/Chicago, which also include the Summer Gala, the Hugo Television Awards, CineYouth Festival, INTERCOM Competition, International Summer Screenings Program and Education Outreach.

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