Night Moves

By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

CHICAGO FESTIVAL ANNOUNCES AUDIENCE CHOICE AWARDS

Feature film TRUST and documentary LOUDER THAN A BOMB share 2010 Audience Choice Award

CHICAGO, October 22, 2010 – The 46th Chicago International Film Festival proudly announces the Audience Choice Awards, presented by Buick Regal, and the juried Chicago Award. Audiences received ballots at every public screening during the two-week Festival to rank films on a five-point scale. Votes are tallied and weighted based on attendance so each film has an equal opportunity to win the award.

Audience Choice Award, presented by Buick Regal
LOUDER THAN A BOMB (USA)

Who ever said poetry was boring? Four teams of supremely talented Chicago high school students harness the ecstatic power of words as they prepare to compete in the world’s largest youth poetry slam right here in Chicago. The film also received the Chicago Award, Special Jury Prize. Directors: Greg Jacobs and Jon Siskel

TRUST (USA)
After carefree teenager Anna’s life is shattered by an online sexual predator, her parents (Clive Owen, Catherine Keener) struggle to help her pick up the pieces. As anger and disbelief drive her father’s desire for revenge, Anna is left to contend with her feelings of guilt and shame. Commanding performances by an ensemble cast drive this fiercely honest look at the devastating aftermath of rape. Lilana Liberato was awarded the Festival’s Silver Hugo for Best Actress (photo attached). Director: David Schwimmer

Audience Choice Award – The Human Condition

The Audience Choice Award in our 60-second film competition The Human Condition goes to BOIL, directed by Chicagoan Darren Davidson. BOIL is a comedy about the importance of taking action.
Chicago Award
Designed to honor the best film from the Festival’s Illinois[e]makers program of short, feature, and documentary films, the Chicago Award goes to TONY & JANINA’S AMERICAN WEDDING, a heart-wrenching film that puts a very human face on a current and painful political issue by intimately and expertly telling the story of one family’s American Dream-turned-nightmare as they are torn apart by a flawed U.S. immigration system. Director: Ruth Leitman

The Special Jury Prize goes to LOUDER THAN A BOMB, a meticulously crafted and inspiring film that celebrates with vitality and good spirit a spectrum of American youth—Chicago youth to be exact—at their most creative.

The Chicago Award jury consisted of local filmmakers James Choi, Emily Hart, and Dan Rybicky.

Led by Presenting Partner, Columbia College Chicago, the 46th Chicago International Film Festival’s sponsors to date include: Premiere Partners – American Airlines, Buick; Producing Partners- Stella Artois, DePaul University, AMC Theaters; Major Partners – Allstate, WBBM and theWit as the returning Headquarters Hotel.

ABOUT CINEMA/CHICAGO

Cinema/Chicago is a not-for-profit cultural and educational organization dedicated to encouraging better understanding between cultures and to making a positive contribution to the art form of the moving image. The Chicago International Film Festival is part of the year-round programs presented by Cinema/Chicago, which also include the Summer Gala, the Hugo Television Awards, CineYouth Festival, INTERCOM Competition, International Summer Screenings Program and Education Outreach.

Leave a Reply

Quote Unquotesee all »

“By the time the sounds of the Von Trapp children warbling ‘Silent Night’ drift through The Giver, you may find yourself wondering what fresh movie hell this is. In truth, the enervating hash of dystopian dread, vague religiosity and commercial advertising-style uplift is nothing if not stale. Adapted from Lois Lowry’s book for young readers, the story involves an isolated society that, with its cubistic dwellings, mindless smiles, monochromatic environs and nebulous communitarianism, seem modeled on a Scandinavian country or an old Mentos commercial.”
~ Manohla Dargis’ Deadly Lede For Review Of The Giver

“It’s possible that in the coming days or, God forbid, weeks, the president could have something more specific to say about the freighted decades-long history of political imbalance at work, in this case between a mostly black working-class town and its majority white government and police force. But this is a black man who must choose his words about race, governance, and law enforcement even more carefully than a white politician would. And this is the third summer in which, as president, he would have to do so…

“Until this point in the turmoil, the absence of the crucial second face in the incident seemed to heighten the distance between police and the people they serve. It grants them both an anonymity and autonomy that matches the bizarre transformation, in Ferguson and elsewhere, of police into troops. The riot gear turns 2014 into a dot on a Jim Crow–era timeline. Since the officer’s name wasn’t made public more immediately, it should have seemed urgent for the police to lose the riot attire and take steps to minimize distrust, to dispel the contagious assumption that silence equates racism…

“What is so affecting isn’t just that 18-year-old Michael Brown was killed when he was barely a man. It’s other things as well. One was how many reports of the incident that first day mentioned that he was about to start college. That’s a rite that’s universally emotional. But for a black male from a poor family, the first day of college is a freighted day that usually requires the sacrifice of more than one person. Black people know the odds of getting to and graduating from college, and that they’re low. That Brown seemed to be on the right path compounded the parental, local, and national outrage over his being wiped from it.”

~ Wesley Morris On Let’s Be Cops, The Shooting In Ferguson, Obama…