By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

CHICAGO FESTIVAL ANNOUNCES AUDIENCE CHOICE AWARDS

Feature film TRUST and documentary LOUDER THAN A BOMB share 2010 Audience Choice Award

CHICAGO, October 22, 2010 – The 46th Chicago International Film Festival proudly announces the Audience Choice Awards, presented by Buick Regal, and the juried Chicago Award. Audiences received ballots at every public screening during the two-week Festival to rank films on a five-point scale. Votes are tallied and weighted based on attendance so each film has an equal opportunity to win the award.

Audience Choice Award, presented by Buick Regal
LOUDER THAN A BOMB (USA)

Who ever said poetry was boring? Four teams of supremely talented Chicago high school students harness the ecstatic power of words as they prepare to compete in the world’s largest youth poetry slam right here in Chicago. The film also received the Chicago Award, Special Jury Prize. Directors: Greg Jacobs and Jon Siskel

TRUST (USA)
After carefree teenager Anna’s life is shattered by an online sexual predator, her parents (Clive Owen, Catherine Keener) struggle to help her pick up the pieces. As anger and disbelief drive her father’s desire for revenge, Anna is left to contend with her feelings of guilt and shame. Commanding performances by an ensemble cast drive this fiercely honest look at the devastating aftermath of rape. Lilana Liberato was awarded the Festival’s Silver Hugo for Best Actress (photo attached). Director: David Schwimmer

Audience Choice Award – The Human Condition

The Audience Choice Award in our 60-second film competition The Human Condition goes to BOIL, directed by Chicagoan Darren Davidson. BOIL is a comedy about the importance of taking action.
Chicago Award
Designed to honor the best film from the Festival’s Illinois[e]makers program of short, feature, and documentary films, the Chicago Award goes to TONY & JANINA’S AMERICAN WEDDING, a heart-wrenching film that puts a very human face on a current and painful political issue by intimately and expertly telling the story of one family’s American Dream-turned-nightmare as they are torn apart by a flawed U.S. immigration system. Director: Ruth Leitman

The Special Jury Prize goes to LOUDER THAN A BOMB, a meticulously crafted and inspiring film that celebrates with vitality and good spirit a spectrum of American youth—Chicago youth to be exact—at their most creative.

The Chicago Award jury consisted of local filmmakers James Choi, Emily Hart, and Dan Rybicky.

Led by Presenting Partner, Columbia College Chicago, the 46th Chicago International Film Festival’s sponsors to date include: Premiere Partners – American Airlines, Buick; Producing Partners- Stella Artois, DePaul University, AMC Theaters; Major Partners – Allstate, WBBM and theWit as the returning Headquarters Hotel.

ABOUT CINEMA/CHICAGO

Cinema/Chicago is a not-for-profit cultural and educational organization dedicated to encouraging better understanding between cultures and to making a positive contribution to the art form of the moving image. The Chicago International Film Festival is part of the year-round programs presented by Cinema/Chicago, which also include the Summer Gala, the Hugo Television Awards, CineYouth Festival, INTERCOM Competition, International Summer Screenings Program and Education Outreach.

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“One of my favorite things in watching any performance on film is when there isn’t a lot of cutting going on and when you get a chance to become really absorbed in the artist in hand. The same way we do, hopefully, at a concert, when we get a chance to really trip in to something that’s happening on stage. Whether the singer’s singing, or one of the other musicians is playing, we sort of stay there instead of cutting round with our eyes a lot.”
~ Jonathan Demme

“We’ve talked about this before in the past, my obsession with the Shakespearean histories having the ideal combination of the sweet and the sour. In ‘Henry IV, Part II’ which we’ve discussed before, in the end of that story it’s very complex and haunting because Prince Hal becomes Henry the King, and he has transcended his hoodlum days and at the ceremony is Falstaff, his good friend with whom he has really fucked around and been a loser with, and Falstaff comes up to him and says, ‘Now that you’re king we can really party,’ and the king famously says, ‘I know thee not, old man.’ It becomes Henry IV’s anointment and Falstaff’s catastrophe. That’s life. I have experienced very little unfettered triumph. There are moments, such as when my children are born, but even that comes with new fears and anxieties. In a sense the better you can communicate that life is both at once, the more powerful over time something becomes. One strives for something where the threads are there because it lasts in way that is very palpable. The idea of a tragedy is powerful in literature and theater, but in cinema it doesn’t work, certainly not commercially, and less so critically. Why is that? I think it has to do with how movies are so close to us.”
~ James Gray