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Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

David Byrne On The Wall Street Soundtrack

Via David Byrne’s mailing list, notes on his substantial contribution to Oliver Stone’s latest. “On Friday, the movie Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps comes out, and I’m all over the soundtrack! Oliver Stone’s film recreates scenes from the bank collapses and bailouts, and the attendant shenanigans of a couple of years ago… and of course Gekko is back. Stone approached me about music a while back, and I met him at an office and gave him a pile of records. He ended up mainly using a lot of songs from my recent collaboration with Brian Eno (“Everything That Happens Will Happen Today”), a few songs from recent solo and dance score records, and a reprise of “This Must Be The Place,” the Talking Heads song that was used in the first Wall Street movie. It was almost like I’d scored the picture. Stone was super accommodating – inviting me numerous times to view rough assemblies to be sure I was OK with how the music was being used. This is pretty unusual; most times licensing a song for a movie is a bureaucratic formality, and the artist is never invited into the process. That said, I’ve only turned down movie song use once or twice for aesthetic reasons – if I thought a scene made unfortunate associations with a song. If you’ve got these recordings already, this all won’t mean anything to you, but if not, and if you see the movie and wonder, what was that music? – here is your answer. The music, along with some score pieces by fellow Scot Craig Armstrong, is available today on iTunes, and via all the usual download and online outlets.” (Info.)

3 Responses to “David Byrne On The Wall Street Soundtrack”

  1. Andrew Turrieta says:

    What a wonderful choice…Creative art begets creative thought, and once again we see ourselves in ways we would otherwise never have.

  2. The first thing I noticed was the music (which I hardly ever do) and that continued throughout and that’s why I am at this site.

    Next; the movie itself was well filmed and presented a tough subject. Over all I learned that Corporations/Banker/Anyone in chaoots with government is a bad thing; while capitalism without government can accomplish wonderful things (as if America doesn’t know this) as in the case of the the power company brought to fruition in the movie. Good movie story, acting and music.

  3. Proto - Lifetime Byrne fan... says:

    I too, am here because of the movie score. It made me pull this album back into my regular play lists. Great movie. Greater music…

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“Ten years ago at Telluride, I said on a panel that theatrical distribution was dying. It seemed obvious to me. I was surprised how many in the audience violently objected: ‘People will always want to go to the movies!’ That’s true, but it’s also true that theatrical cinema as we once knew it has died. Theatrical cinema is now Event Cinema, just as theatrical plays and musical performances are Events. No one just goes to a movie. It’s a planned occasion. Four types of Event Cinema remain.
1. Spectacle (IMAX-style blockbusters)
2. Family (cartoon like features)
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