By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

AURORA CINESTREEM LAUNCHES THE PREMIERE ANTI-PIRACY DEVICE TO STREAM CONTENT

Industry Veterans Bring Patented Technology with Significant Studio Support to the Marketplace

Los Angeles, September 23, 2010: Aurora CineStreem Corporation announced the launch of the Aurora CineStreem Professional Set-Top Box today, a device designed to securely bring streaming content to film industry professionals via a standard Internet connection. The first of its kind, the device’s features include the distribution of content, starting from film dailies and through award season, in lieu of distributing DVD screeners. The innovative system has been developed by veteran film producer Anatoly Fradis and Emmy-winning special effects wizard John Vulich with state of the art copyright protection.

The Aurora CineStreem Professional Set-Top Box is poised to be a revolutionary advancement, expediting and securing the delivery of material needed in the production and distribution of filmed media. Fradis and Vulich pulled from their own experiences as filmmakers to design professional features to meet the specific needs and requirements of the media industry. The device may be used to view demo reels, casting sessions, screen tests, location scouting during pre-production and viewing dailies and rough cuts during production and post-production all the way to delivering screeners for sales purposes and awards consideration.

Members of various guilds and studio executives have been invited to demo the device prior to its launch, including AMPAS and BAFTA, as an alternative option to combat the piracy threats found within the awards season screener distribution process. The Aurora CineStreem Professional device uses a closed system without direct access to media files, and thus eliminating the possibility to copy or modify content.

Aurora CineStreem Corporation President Anatoly Fradis said: “We are leaps and bounds ahead of our competitors and the first to bring such a device to the entertainment community and eventually consumers. Aurora CineStreem is the next step in technology and answer to copyright infringements caused by piracy.”

The compact device, weighing just 0.75 lbs requires only a Broadband Internet connection to employ its high-powered Sigma secure media processor. The Aurora CineStreem offers a pioneering five levels of copy protection with AES 128 bit Encryption, password authentication, HDCP, Rovi/Macrovision analog protection and forensic watermarking, which is now required by many studios for distribution of early window HD content. The system also employs a proprietary variable bit-rate encoding application as a method to prepare the content for seamless streaming on the platform. The device will be sold for under $200/box with a flat subscription fee to be determined.

Vice-President of Creative Development John Vulich said: “The device offers studios, guilds, unions and independent filmmakers unparalleled security as well as a cost-effective solution against piracy and content distribution, which has been overwhelmingly acknowledged among industry executives”

A consumer version of the device will also be introduced featuring Internet TV channels and VOD content. The company is working closely with a major studio, who is testing the Professional version of the device, as well as finalizing a deal for consumer implementation of the product with a major Russian Network (120,000,000 viewers) and one of the largest Networks in Asia (with more than 170,000,000 viewers).

About Anatoly Fradis, President
After working as a film director for Mosfilm Studios in Russia and moving to the United States, 32 years ago, Fradis has become one of the major suppliers of American films to Russia, selling as many as 60 films per year. Among his many diversified activities, Fradis owns and controls several companies, with business activities ranging from travel services to theatre construction and management. Entertainment partnerships have included “Back in the USSR” for 20th Century Fox/Largo Entertainment; “The Inner Circle” for Columbia Pictures; first US films, sold for private distribution in Russia, such as “Rambo – First Blood,” “Gone with the Wind,” “Wanted Dead or Alive,” “Stella,” and “Elvira-Mistress of the Dark.” Fradis produced four pictures in cooperation with Roger Corman, as well as several episodes of Zalman King’s “Red Shoe Diaries” for Showtime and the action-thriller “Black Sea-213″ for HBO/Playboy International.

In 1999, Fradis co-founded Theatre Promotions Management Corporation which was soon tasked with the renovation of the October Cinema in Moscow, supplying this 11 screen multiplex with super-advanced film projection, sound and concert equipment. The year 2002 saw the creation of Marching Band Productions, with his long time associate, Joseph Cohen, which financed and executive produced Bob Dylan’s “Masked and Anonymous” (Sony Classics). In 2005 to 2006, Fradis financed and produced “Return of the Living Dead: Necropolis” and “Return of the Living Dead: Rave to the Grave,” which were sold for the distribution in the United States to NBC Universal/Sci-Fi Channel and LionsGate Entertainment. Fradis is in pre-production on a $25 million major motion picture, “Babi Yar,” to be directed by Barry Levinson and in development or pre-production on several other projects, including “Off Center: Paul Lynde Story,” and “Chronic” (to be directed by four-time Emmy winner, John Vulich).

About John Vulich, Vice-President of Creative Development
John Vulich is a four-time Emmy award winner and has worked in the motion picture industry for over 25 years as a special effects artist, director and most recently as a producer. He is a member of the Director’s Guild of America and the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. In 1989, with his partner Everett Burrel, he founded the award-winning special effects company, Optic Nerve Studios. Vulich has done visual effects work for virtually every major film studio with directors and producers such as Tim Burton, Spike Jonze, Christopher Nolan, and Joss Whedon. Film credits include, “Batman Returns,” “Robin Hood: Men in Tights,” “Hot Shots! Part Duex,” “Dracula: Dead and Loving It,” “Starship Troopers,” “Batman & Robin,” “Susan’s Plan,” “Being John Malkovich,” “We Were Soldiers” and “The Prestige.”

He received four Emmy awards and 12 nominations for his special effects work on the hit TV shows “Babylon 5,” “X-Files” and “Buffy the Vampire Slayer.” In 1996, he directed an episode of the ABC TV series “Hypernauts.” Since 2004, Vulich has been focusing on producing, with such credits as “Madhouse,” two films in the “Return of the Living Dead” series and “Furnace.”

The advisers and partners in the company include renowned Hollywood financier, Joseph Cohen, talent agent, Todd Smith and DDA’s Chairman, Dennis Davidson.

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One Response to “AURORA CINESTREEM LAUNCHES THE PREMIERE ANTI-PIRACY DEVICE TO STREAM CONTENT”

  1. Porky says:

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