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Kim Voynar

By Kim Voynar Voynar@moviecitynews.com

Constance McMillen and the Super Secret Prom

Hey y’all, you know what would be funny? Like, hysterically funny? Like, let’s hold a super-secret prom and not tell that bee-yatch Constance McMillen about it! Then she and her lesbo girlfriend and the stupid LD kids will show up for that prom, while we are across town partying it up at our own private prom! Won’t that be, like, hilarious, y’all?! And then we’ll put pics of our secret prom on our Facebook pages to make sure we give the ACLU more arsenal for their stupid lawsuit, and so the whole world will know we’re a bunch of teenage bigots! Hahahahah! Boy, won’t THAT be something to be proud of later?
I was holding out on writing this up until there was some kind of confirmation that it actually happened, and now Constance has confirmed that it did.
Boy, you just can’t beat the stupid out of some people. In spite of Constance McMillen’s lawsuit against her school district when her high school denied her the right to attend her prom with her girlfriend, her bigoted fellow classmates (with, I’m sure, the help of their equally bigoted parents) still managed to keep Constance from going to her prom.
The school district had alleged in defending the lawsuit that the prom her school had canceled just to keep her from attending would, in fact, be held and that she would, in fact, be invited to it. And there was such a prom, and she was invited to the prom. Problem is, only seven people showed up to the official prom, with the rest of the students apparently attending a super-secret prom held in another location. What’s particularly shocking about this is that the entire student body apparently colluded in keeping Constance and the other kids who showed up for the official prom (two of whom have learning disabilities) from knowing about their secret prom.
Blogger Joe.My.God has pics on his site culled from a Facebook page of the teenage bigots partying it up at their secret prom, while Constance, her girlfriend, and the five other kids who showed up for the official prom sat at the other one wondering what the hell happened (well, I’m sure Constance is smart enough that she figured it out pretty quickly).
This whole business stinks to high heaven, but if you’ve seen Prom Night in Mississippi, the documentary about another Mississippi high school that held segregated proms until just a couple years ago (also with the collusion of parents and school officials) it’s not terribly shocking to learn that this kind of blatant ignorance and discrimination could happen in 2010. Apparently in Mississippi, some folks think it’s terribly important to teach their children that keeping those uppity gays in their place is important work. Wonder how many of them are also secretly Klan members? And how many of them went to church on Easter Sunday, false faces carefully in place as they purported to worship Jesus, who taught us to love our neighbor as ourselves, and to remove the mote from our own eye.
Seems like some folks down there need to read their Bibles a little more carefully. Criminy.
Constance seems to have a good head on her shoulders in spite of the bullshit that’s surrounded this whole affair. I hope she knows there are plenty of folks outside Mississippi who supported her fight to attend her prom and her right to be who she is, and who admire the bravery she’s shown in being an openly gay teen while surrounded by bigots. Frankly, I’m shocked she hasn’t been physically attacked yet. I also sincerely hope that Constance, when graduation is over (and hopefully there won’t be a “secret” graduation to which she’s not invited) will move the hell out of Mississippi and go live in NYC, or San Francisco, or Seattle … some place where she can be openly who she is without dealing with as much of that nonsense.

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“Let me try and be as direct as I possibly can with you on this. There was no relationship to repair. I didn’t intend for Harvey to buy and release The Immigrant – I thought it was a terrible idea. And I didn’t think he would want the film, and I didn’t think he would like the film. He bought the film without me knowing! He bought it from the equity people who raised the money for me in the States. And I told them it was a terrible idea, but I had no say over the matter. So they sold it to him without my say-so, and with me thinking it was a terrible idea. I was completely correct, but I couldn’t do anything about it. It was not my preference, it was not my choice, I did not want that to happen, I have no relationship with Harvey. So, it’s not like I repaired some relationship, then he screwed me again, and I’m an idiot for trusting him twice! Like I say, you try to distance yourself as much as possible from the immediate response to a movie. With The Immigrant I had final cut. So he knew he couldn’t make me change it. But he applied all the pressure he could, including shelving the film.”
James Gray

“I’m an unusual producer because I control the destiny of a lot of the films I’ve done. Most of them are in perfect states of restoration and preservation and distribution, and I aim to keep them in distribution. HanWay Films, which is my sales company, has a 500-film catalogue, which is looked after and tended like a garden. I’m still looking after my films in the catalogue and trying to get other people to look after their films, which we represent intellectually, to try to keep them alive. A film has to be run through a projector to be alive, unfortunately, and those electric shadows are few and far between now. It’s very hard to go and see films in a movie house. I was always involved with the sales and marketing of my films, right up from The Shout onwards. I’ve had good periods, but I also had a best period because the film business was in its best period then. You couldn’t make The Last Emperor today. You couldn’t make The Sheltering Sky today. You couldn’t make those films anymore as independent films. There are neither the resources nor the vision within the studios to go to them and say, “I want to make a film about China with no stars in it.”Then, twenty years ago, I thought, “OK, I’m going to sell my own films but I don’t want to make it my own sales company.” I wanted it to be for me but I wanted to make it open for every other producer, so they don’t feel that they make a film but I get the focus. So, it’s a company that is my business and I’m involved with running it in a certain way, but I’m not seen as a competitor with other people that use it. It’s used by lots of different producers apart from me. When I want to use it, however, it’s there for me and I suppose I’m planning to continue making all my films to be sold by HanWay. I don’t have to, but I do because it’s in my building and the marketing’s here, and I can do it like that. Often, it sounds like I’m being easy about things, but it’s much more difficult than it sounds. It’s just that I’ve been at it for a long time and there’s lots of fat and security around my business. I know how to make films, but it’s not easy—it’s become a very exacting life.”
~ Producer Jeremy Thomas