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Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Corporate feelings and Brittany Murphy

chriselliotspawn.jpgUnder accepted U. S. law, corporations have the same rights as human beings, so does that mean they have feelings as well? A few weeks ago, problems on a film set led to Brittany Murphy losing a role in a film shooting in Puerto Rico. On December 4th, Abby Elliot, 22-year-old daughter of former SNL member Chris Elliot, had a creepy turn impersonating the actress and openly mocking problems she may or may not have had. Murphy died today. So why was the meager bit funny on December 5 and unfunny today? What’s there to be embarrassed about? The Chicago Tribune’s Mark Caro [@MarkCaro] Twittered this evening: “Caught up with SNL’s recent takedown of Brittany Murphy. Kicking little folks when they’re down—a modern SNL tradition, alas.” A film blogger known for exotic comments about celebrity death and weight issues campaigned earlier today: “This will be taken down in no time off the NBC-owned Hulu site in the wake of Brittany Murphy’s death. It plays pretty rough in the wake of today’s news. It’ll be gone in less than an hour or two. Somebody needs to copy it and put it up on YouTube right away.” I can’t parse the logic of that tumble. But corporate logic seems more tender, at least in Hulu’s case; in Saturday Night Live’s? Who’s the kinder corporate human? The more human(e) corporation? Whatever the case, comedy is in the timing. Such as celebutweets about Murphy’s untimely passing. Lindsay Lohan: My deepest condolences go out to all of Brittany Murphy’s loved ones & may she rest in peace. She was a great talent w/a beautiful soul. XO. Soleil Moon Frye: Am beyond words by the loss of Brittany Murphy. I was so blessed to know your grace. My heart goes out to your mama+ loved ones.” And someone named Josh Groban: Hollywood loses another bright soul….how many more? A decade of decadence and devastation. Time to wake up.

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“Ten years ago at Telluride, I said on a panel that theatrical distribution was dying. It seemed obvious to me. I was surprised how many in the audience violently objected: ‘People will always want to go to the movies!’ That’s true, but it’s also true that theatrical cinema as we once knew it has died. Theatrical cinema is now Event Cinema, just as theatrical plays and musical performances are Events. No one just goes to a movie. It’s a planned occasion. Four types of Event Cinema remain.
1. Spectacle (IMAX-style blockbusters)
2. Family (cartoon like features)
3. Horror (teen-driven), and
4. Film Club (formerly arthouse but now anything serious).

There are isolated pockets like black cinema, romcom, girl’s-night-out, seniors, teen gross-outs, but it’s primarily those four. Everything else is TV. Now I have to go back to episode five of ‘Looming Tower.'”
~ Paul Schrader

“Because of my relative candor on Twitter regarding why I quit my day job, my DMs have overflowed with similar stories from colleagues around the globe. These peeks behind the curtains of film festivals, venues, distributors and funding bodies weren’t pretty. Certain dismal patterns recurred (and resonated): Boards who don’t engage with or even understand their organization’s artistic mission and are insensitive to the diverse neighborhood in which their organization’s venue is located; incompetent founders and/or presidents who create only obstacles, never solutions; unduly empowered, Trumpian bean counters who chip away at the taste and experiences that make organizations’ cultural offerings special; expensive PR teams that don’t bring to the table a bare-minimum familiarity with the rich subcultural art form they’re half-heartedly peddling as “product”; nonprofit arts organizations for whom art now ranks as a distant-second goal behind profit.”
~ Eric Allen Hatch