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Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Alexandre Desplat on working with Terrence Malick, more


At a masterclass at the 50th Thessaloniki International Film Festival, Alexandre Desplat talks about working with Terrence Malick on 2010’s Tree of Life. “The most important thing for me, for music to express,” the composer, who’s worked on nine features in 2009, says, “is the invisible, to show what is not in the film, whether outside the frame, or in the depth of field.” He offers a cooking analogy about when the score and the film finally work together. When spaghetti is cooked just right, he says, throwing his arms up toward the blank screen behind him, “It sticks to the wall. You know it’s right when the music sticks to the scene.” Asked if there are scores he wishes he could have written to earlier films, he thought for a moment, and answered, “Thousands… Polanski, Chinatown, Malick’s Days of Heaven, Hitchcocks… Color! The things Polanski and Jerry Goldsmith did with silence in ChinatownUn Peau Douce, I would love to have been able to do a Truffaut.”
Below, Desplat answers a question from the audience about Tarantino’s soundtracks; describes the “exaltation” and “crap” of the film composer’s life; and talks about working with light and “color” on Vermeer-based fantasy “The Girl With The Pearl Earring.”



Desplat vs. Tarantino

“Exaltation and Crap”

“Light, Color and Vermeer”

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