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Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

[PR] Sofia checks into the Chateau Marmont

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From The Plaza to the Tokyo Hyatt to Sunset Boulevard: “OSCAR-WINNING WRITER/DIRECTOR SOFIA COPPOLA TO MAKE SOMEWHERE WITH FOCUS FEATURES; STEPHEN DORFF TO STAR: Reuniting with the film company with which she made the Academy Award-winning hit Lost in Translation, writer-director Sofia Coppola will make her next movie, Somewhere, with Focus Features. Somewhere will star Stephen Dorff (soon to be seen in Public Enemies) and Elle Fanning (The Curious Case of Benjamin Button). Focus CEO James Schamus made the announcement today.
Ms. Coppola is also reteamed with Pathé, which will have rights to the film in France, Benelux, and Switzerland; and Tohokushinsa, which will hold rights to the film in Japan and select Asian territories. Medusa Film will have rights to Somewhere in Italy, where a portion of the filming will be done, and is lending production assistance. Focus will hold rights to the film in all other territories.
In addition to directing Somewhere from her original screenplay, Ms. Coppola will produce the feature with Roman Coppola (The Darjeeling Limited) and G. Mac Brown (Australia) through American Zoetrope. Harris Savides (cinematographer on Focus’ Academy Award-winning Milk) will be director of photography on the movie. Lost in Translation executive producers Francis Ford Coppola and Fred Roos and Marie Antoinette executive producer Paul Rassam will encore in the same capacities on Somewhere, which will be overseen for Focus by president of production John Lyons.
Somewhere will begin production on location in Los Angeles this summer. Somewhere is the story of Johnny Marco (to be played by Mr. Dorff), a bad-boy actor stumbling through a life of excess at the Chateau Marmont Hotel in Hollywood. With an unexpected visit from his 11-year-old daughter (Ms. Fanning), Johnny is forced to look at the questions we all must confront.


Ms. Coppola won the Best Original Screenplay Academy Award for Lost in Translation, which grossed over $100 million worldwide for Focus and was an Academy Award nominee for Best Picture. Ms. Coppola was also an Academy Award nominee for Best Director; she is one of only three women to ever have been nominated in the latter category. Her other films as writer/director include The Virgin Suicides, which she adapted from Jeffrey Eugenides’ novel, and Marie Antoinette, which won the Academy Award for Best Costume Design (Milena Canonero).
Mr. Schamus commented, “Lost in Translation remains among Focus’ most beloved movies, so we have long looked forward to making another picture with Sofia. Somewhere will have all the witty, moving, and empathetic qualities that characterize all her work.”
Ms. Coppola said, “I’m very happy to be back making a movie with Focus. I’ve wanted to film an intimate story set in contemporary Los Angeles, and I’m looking forward to working with Stephen Dorff and Elle Fanning.”
Focus Features and Focus Features International (FFI) (www.filminfocus.com) together comprise a singular global company, dedicated to producing, acquiring, financing, selling, and distributing original and daring films from emerging and established filmmakers – films that challenge mainstream moviegoers to embrace and enjoy voices and visions from around the world. The company’s flexible and nuanced approach to distribution allows it to support a wide range of films, from those geared to a single local market to worldwide hits. The company operates as Focus Features domestically, and as Focus Features International overseas.
Domestically, the Focus Features slate includes Cary Joji Fukunaga’s epic dramatic thriller Sin Nombre, winner of 2 awards at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival; writer/director Jim Jarmusch’s The Limits of Control, starring Isaach De Bankolé; Away We Go, directed by Academy Award winner Sam Mendes and starring John Krasinski and Maya Rudolph; Shane Acker’s animated fantasy epic 9, starring Elijah Wood and Jennifer Connelly and produced by Tim Burton and Timur Bekmambetov; Greenberg, the new film from writer/director Noah Baumbach, starring Ben Stiller; Academy Award-winning writer/directors Joel and Ethan Coen’s A Serious Man; and Taking Woodstock, the new film from Academy Award-winning director Ang Lee.
Focus Features and Focus Features International are part of NBC Universal, one of the world’s leading media and entertainment companies in the development, production, and marketing of entertainment, news, and information to a global audience. Formed in May 2004 through the combining of NBC and Vivendi Universal Entertainment, NBC Universal owns and operates a valuable portfolio of news and entertainment networks, a premier motion picture company, significant television production operations, a leading television stations group, and world-renowned theme parks. NBC Universal is 80% owned by General Electric and 20% owned by Vivendi.

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