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Cinema Audio Society

2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009

Awards

For Outstanding Achievement in Sound Mixing
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE
Resul Pookutty
Ian Tapp
Richard Pryke

Television Movies and Mini-Series
John Adams, Episode 1: “Join or Die”
Jay Meagher, CAS
Mike Minkler, CAS
Bob Beemer, CAS

Television Series
24: “Redemption”
William F. Gocke, CAS
Michael Olman, CAS
Kenneth Kobett, CAS

Television – Non-Fiction, Variety or Music – Series or Specials:
Deadliest Catch: ”No Mercy”
Bob Bronow, CAS
DVD Original Programming:
Smashing Pumpkins- If All Goes Wrong
Kerry Brown
Brian Slack

__________________________________________

Nominations

For Outstanding Achievement in Sound Mixing

Motion Pictures:
THE DARK KNIGHT
Ed Novick
Lora Hirschberg
Gary A. Rizzo

IRON MAN
Mark Ulano, CAS
Christopher Boyes
Lora Hirschberg

QUANTUM OF SOLACE
Chris Munro, CAS
Mike Prestwood Smith
Mark Taylor

SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE
Resul Pookutty
Ian Tapp
Richard Pryke

WALL-E
Tom Myers
Michael Semanick, CAS

Television Movies and Mini-Series

Generation Kill, Episode 5: “A Burning Dog”
Danny Hambrook
Stuart Hilliker
Alexandros Sidiropoulous

John Adams, Episode 1: “Join or Die”
Jay Meagher, CAS
Mike Minkler, CAS
Bob Beemer, CAS

John Adams, Episode 2: “Independence”
Jay Meagher, CAS
Mike Minkler, CAS
Bob Beemer, CAS

John Adams, Episode 3: “Don’t Tread on Me”
Jay Meagher, CAS
Marc Fishman
Tony Lamberti

Recount
Gary Alper
Gary C. Bourgeois, CAS
Greg Orloff, CAS

Television Series

24: “Redemption”
William F. Gocke, CAS
Michael Olman, CAS
Kenneth Kobett, CAS

Dexter: Episode 5: “Turning Biminese”
Roger Pietschman, CAS
Elmo Ponsdomenech
Kevin Roache

House: “Lsst Resort”
Von Varge
Gerry Lentz, CAS
Rich Weingart, CAS

Lost: “Meet Kevin Johnson”
Robert Anderson, Jr., CAS
Frank Morrone, CAS
Scott Weber

Mad Men: “The Jet Set”
Peter Bentley
Ken Teaney, CAS
Geoffrey Rubay

Television – Non-Fiction, Variety or Music – Series or Specials:

American Idol: Season 7 Finale
Brian Riordan, CAS
Conner Moore

Deadliest Catch: ”No Mercy”
Bob Bronow, CAS

Great Performances at the Met: “La Boheme”
Bill King
Ken Hahn, CAS
Jay Saks
John Bowen

Great Performances: “Company”
Jorge Silva
Ken Hahn, CAS

Steve Miller Band Live in Chicago
Andy Johns
Brian Slack

DVD Original Programming:

Little Mermaid: Ariel’s Beginning
Carlos Sotolongo
Mark Fleming, CAS
Tom Dahl, CAS

Meerkat Manor: The Story Begins
Nominees TBA

Runnin’ Down a Dream: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers
Andy Johns
Brian Slack

Smashing Pumpkins- If All Goes Wrong
Kerry Brown
Brian Slack

Wargames: The Dead Code
Terry O’Bright, CAS

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“The core fear is what can happen to you, personally. Your body. That’s what horror films deal with, precisely. We are a very thin skin wrapped around a pumping heart and guts. At any given moment it can come down to that, be it diseases, or somebody’s assault, or war, or a car wreck. You could be reduced to the simple laws of physics and your body’s vulnerability. The edged weapon is the penultimate weapon to disclose that reality to you.”
~ Wes Craven, 1996, promoting Scream

MAMET
Well, that, to me, is always the trick of dramaturgy; theoretically, perfectly, what one wants to do is put the protagonist and the audience in exactly the same position. The main question in drama, the way I was taught, is always what does the protagonist want. That’s what drama is. It comes down to that. It’s not about theme, it’s not about ideas, it’s not about setting, but what the protagonist wants. What gives rise to the drama, what is the precipitating event, and how, at the end of the play, do we see that event culminated? Do we see the protagonist’s wishes fulfilled or absolutely frustrated? That’s the structure of drama. You break it down into three acts.

INTERVIEWER
Does this explain why your plays have so little exposition?

MAMET
Yes. People only speak to get something. If I say, Let me tell you a few things about myself, already your defenses go up; you go, Look, I wonder what he wants from me, because no one ever speaks except to obtain an objective. That’s the only reason anyone ever opens their mouth, onstage or offstage. They may use a language that seems revealing, but if so, it’s just coincidence, because what they’re trying to do is accomplish an objective… The question is where does the dramatist have to lead you? Answer: the place where he or she thinks the audience needs to be led. But what does the character think? Does the character need to convey that information? If the answer is no, then you’d better cut it out, because you aren’t putting the audience in the same position with the protagonist. You’re saying, in effect, Let’s stop the play. That’s what the narration is doing—stopping the play… It’s action, as Aristotle said. That’s all that it is—exactly what the person does. It’s not what they “think,” because we don’t know what they think. It’s not what they say. It’s what they do, what they’re physically trying to accomplish on the stage. Which is exactly the same way we understand a person’s character in life—not by what they say, but by what they do. Say someone came up to you and said, I’m glad to be your neighbor because I’m a very honest man. That’s my character. I’m honest, I like to do things, I’m forthright, I like to be clear about everything, I like to be concise. Well, you really don’t know anything about that guy’s character. Or the person is onstage, and the playwright has him or her make those same claims in several subtle or not-so-subtle ways, the audience will say, Oh yes, I understand their character now; now I understand that they are a character. But in fact you don’t understand anything. You just understand that they’re jabbering to try to convince you of something.
~ David Mamet

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