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Kim Voynar

By Kim Voynar Voynar@moviecitynews.com

Go Tinklenberg!

Awesome news coming from Minnesota Public Radio: The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee has reportedly added El Tinklenberg to the list of candidates it will support from its Red to Blue Fund, which pours money into the coffers of Democratic candidates in races where there’s a good possibility of taking back a Republican-controlled seat.
The DCCC will, it seems, spend more than $1 million in television ads supporting Tinklenberg in his race against Michele “McCarthy” Bachmann. The ads start tomorrow. This could be just what the Tink needs to uproot Bachmann and put a Democrat in the seat for Minnesota’s Sixth Congressional District. One question … will the DCCC’s ads end with a “thank you” to Bachmann for handing them her own head on a silver platter? She keeps trying to backtrack and talk her way out of this, but that’s kind of hard to do when the video of you saying the very things you’re denying saying is out there to be seen by anyone and everyone.
It’s going to be a close race, but here’s hoping Tinklenberg pulls it off. This has just become one of the hottest races to watch on election night.
… and mucho thanks to Ray Pride for tipping me off about this.

4 Responses to “Go Tinklenberg!”

  1. Deathtongue_Groupie says:

    This is on top of the $640K that came in within 48 hours of her appearance on Hardball.
    The RNC must be shitting bricks, she turned a cake walk re-election into a toss up with one Fascist remark.
    Way to go!

  2. Mgmax says:

    Oh great, another “movie” blog that’s all about liberal politics. Anyone know a movie blog that’s about movies?

  3. jeffmcm says:

    Mgmax, didn’t you read the first three letters after the www up above?

  4. swordandpen says:

    Mgmax, do you plan to do this martyr routine on every movie blog?

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“Yes, good movies sprout up, inevitably, in the cracks and seams between the tectonic plates on which all of these franchises stay balanced, and we are reassured of their hardiness. But we don’t see what we don’t see; we don’t see the effort, or the cost of the effort, or the movies of which we’re deprived because of the cost of the effort. Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice may have come from a studio, but it still required a substantial chunk of outside financing, and at $35 million, it’s not even that expensive. No studio could find the $8.5 million it cost Dan Gilroy to make Nightcrawler. Birdman cost a mere $18 million and still had to scrape that together at the last minute. Imagine American movie culture for the last few years without Her or Foxcatcher or American Hustle or The Master or Zero Dark Thirty and it suddenly looks markedly more frail—and those movies exist only because of the fairy godmothership of independent producer Megan Ellison. The grace of billionaires is not a great business model on which to hang the hopes of an art form.”
~ Mark Harris On The State Of The Movies

How do you make a Top Ten list? For tax and organizational purposes, I keep a log of every movie I see (Title, year, director, exhibition format, and location the film was viewed in). Anything with an asterisk to the left of its title means it’s a 2014 release (or something I saw at a festival which is somehow in play for the year). If there’s a performance, or sequence, or line of dialogue, even, that strikes me in a certain way, I’ll make a note of it. So when year end consideration time (that is, the month and change out of the year where I feel valued) rolls around, it’s a little easier to go through and pull some contenders for categories. For 2014, I’m voting in three polls: Indiewire, SEFCA (my critics’ guild), and the Muriels. Since Indiewire was first, it required the most consternation. There were lots of films that I simply never had a chance to see, so I just went with my gut. SEFCA requires a lot of hemming and hawing and trying to be strategic, even though there’s none of the in-person skullduggery that I hear of from folk whose critics’ guild is all in the same city. The Muriels is the most fun to contribute to because it’s after the meat market phase of awards season. Also, because it’s at the beginning of next year, I’ll generally have been able to see everything I wanted to by then. I love making hierarchical lists, partially because they are so subjective and mercurial. Every critical proclamation is based on who you are at that moment and what experiences you’ve had up until that point. So they change, and that’s okay. It’s all a weird game of timing and emotional waveforms, and I’m sure a scientist could do an in-depth dissection of the process that leads to the discovery of shocking trends in collective evaluation. But I love the year end awards crush, because I feel somewhat respected and because I have a wild-and-wooly work schedule that has me bouncing around the city to screenings, or power viewing the screeners I get sent.
Jason Shawhan of Nashville Scene Answers CriticWire