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By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

[PR] No End In Sight in full on YouTube from Monday until the election

NEIS6567_896.jpgOSCAR® NOMINATED “NO END IN SIGHT” TO BE SHOWCASED
ON YOUTUBE™ DURING HEIGHT OF THE 2008 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION
DIRECTOR CHARLES FERGUSON TO MAKE HIS AWARD WINNING DOCUMENTARY
ACCESSIBLE AD-FREE AND UNINTERRUPTED ONLINE FROM SEPTEMBER 1 TO NOVEMBER 5
NO END IN SIGHT, Academy Award® nominee for Best Documentary Feature and winner of the Documentary Special Jury Prize at the 2007 Sundance Film Festival, the first film of its kind to examine the American policies that sent Iraq spiraling into a civil war, will also be the first widely released feature film to screen in its entirety on YouTube™ starting on September 1 and continuing through the 2008 presidential election on Tuesday, November 4. The film will be featured on its own YouTube channel and available to anyone with a computer and high-speed internet connection… NO END IN SIGHT is being made available free to the public to reveal the facts about the Bush Administration’s invasion and occupation of Iraq to voters concerned with the issues of national security and the adverse economic impact of the war when making decisions in this crucial election. NO END IN SIGHT condenses and clarifies the murky decisions made before and after the invasion and is invaluable to the public’s understanding of what went wrong. The film is both an analysis of an ill-conceived war and a plea to consider the impact of future military actions. According to the film’s director, Charles Ferguson, he underwrote the exhibition of the film on YouTube because, “I wanted to make the film, and the facts about the occupation of Iraq, accessible to a larger group of people. My hope is that this will contribute to the process of making better foreign policy decisions moving forward in Iraq and elsewhere. During this election year, it’s important to examine the leadership mentality and policies that caused Iraq to descend into such a horrific state that after 4,000 American deaths, at least a quarter million Iraqis killed, 4 million refugees, and over $2 trillion spent, Iraq remains in a state of near collapse.”


Produced by Representational Pictures and released theatrically by Magnolia Pictures in 2007 and currently available on DVD, NO END IN SIGHT is a jaw-dropping, insider’s tale of the ignorance, incompetence and blind ambition that ensnared the U.S. in a war without a post-invasion plan. In the film, high ranking officials tasked with rebuilding Iraq, such as former Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage, Ambassador Barbara Bodine, Col. Lawrence Wilkerson, who served as Chief of Staff for Secretary of State Colin Powell, and General Jay Garner, who was in charge of the occupation in early 2003, recount principal errors in U.S. policy which opened the door to the insurgency and chaos that engulf Iraq today. From insufficient troop numbers to secure the country to alienating the Iraqi people, NO END IN SIGHT details how a swift military victory descended into a quagmire.
A noted author and foreign policy expert turned first time filmmaker, Ferguson was prompted to make NO END IN SIGHT after discussing the worsening situation in Iraq with some of his foreign affairs colleagues. A month in Baghdad, dozens of interviews and one five hour rough cut later, the film world premiered to critical praise at Sundance and was awarded the Special Documentary Jury Prize “in recognition of the film as timely work that clearly illuminates the misguided policy decisions that have led to the catastrophic quagmire of the US invasion and occupation of Iraq.” Ferguson is a former technology entrepreneur who sold his company Vermeer Technologies to Microsoft in 1996. He received his Ph.D. in political science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and a former senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. A visiting scholar at MIT and University of California, Berkeley, Ferguson is the author of four books: High Stakes, No Prisoners: A Winner’s Tale of Greed and Glory in the Internet Wars, Computer Wars: The Post-IBM World, The Broadband Problem: Anatomy of a Market Failure and a Policy Dilemma and most recently No End In Sight: Iraq’s Descent into Chaos, the full investigative record behind the award-winning film, published in early 2008 by PublicAffairs Books.

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