MCN Blogs
David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Chef Is Dead… Long Live Chef

An iPhone type in is hardly enough of a chance to celebrate a bad mutha Scientologist (hush yo mouth) like Isaac Hayes.
There are some great voices in this generation, but we haven’t really found the deep, threateningly sexy, makes you happy just hearing it voices like Hayes’, Jones’, White’s, Rawls’…
I can dig it. I thought the Stone/Parker to Hayes’ exit was one of the crueler things I have ever seen on air. They were right that he was being a hypocrite, but using his own voice against him… brutal.
Meanwhile, I wonder whether the voice of God, Mr Freeman, has some serious connections upstairs, having stayed out of the Rule of Three.
I raise a big, salty, chocolate ball in your honor. Few artists get to leave absolutely indelible marks in more than one medium. Hayes left us Chef, Shaft, and songs to which we can all make sweet love.

16 Responses to “Chef Is Dead… Long Live Chef”

  1. RoyBatty says:

    Considering the about face Hayes did, he deserved EXACTLY what he got from Stone/Parker. It was also a frightening reminder of just how much of a brainwashing cult Scientology is for a bad ass like Hayes to flip flop that black & white in the span of a couple of months.
    You realize, you just fucking jinxed Freeman, right? As I write this the blood clot from his banged up ribs is making it’s way to aneurysm city.
    The “Rule of Three” lately usually follows the guideline of different medium, same level of celebrity. Freeman is safe because he’s A, much bigger and B, from film (as Mac is; Hayes is music).
    No, the perfect fit would be Arsenio Hall as someone mostly famous for TV with a foot in film.
    But, until this thing blows over, both Delroy Lindo and Bill Cosby should stay home for the next week…

  2. TadAllagash says:

    I disagree with RoyBatty. I found that episode of South Park hard to watch (if par for the course for those two).
    That said, Issac Hayes leaves a much larger mark, in my opinion in the world of music. The South Park thing was nice, but Matt and trey didn’t make Issac. That role was a nice button on a long and important career and LEGACY in music.
    Few of today’s musicians will leave us with as much as Hayes, Curtis Mayfield and Barry White have. The reinterpreted soul in a way that lead to wah-wah funk and disco.
    God Bless Issac Hayes.
    PS – I think Bernie Brillstein’s passing, along with Bernie Mac’s, make this the last of a THREE.

  3. Martin S says:

    The Duke of New York is A#1

  4. TadAllagash says:

    Wow. Both Bernie Mac and Issac Hayes are in the upcoming Fall release SOUL MEN.
    That feature just became a lot higher profile.

  5. IOIOIOI says:

    I am with Tad and Mr. S on this one. The brother did my city proud, and Matt and Trey showed themselves to be the smeckles they can be.

  6. No mention of one of the best Oscar wins… ever? The fact that “Theme from Shaft” won still amazes me.

  7. LexG says:

    The Duke of New York is such a classic, awesome villain — the wardrobe, the car with the DISCO BALLS, that speech to his crew from on high about rolling “down the 69th Street Bridge, on OUR WAY TO FREEDOM,” then Hayes all twitching during the final car chase before getting laid out by The President…
    Such an iconic movie for those of us of a certain age, and Hayes’ contribution was absolutely huge. And the SHAFT song, and that title sequence… just excellent.

  8. yancyskancy says:

    Hell, his legacy would be assured if had retired or died after co-writing all those great Sam and Dave songs. RIP

  9. Bernie Schwartz… keep that head down.

  10. Rothchild says:

    Hayes will be missed, but it’s incredibly stupid and hypocritical to be on a show that rips everything a new one and then to suddenly be pissed, after the fact as well, when they mock your belief system.

  11. tfresca says:

    I know you don’t like Roger very much but he’s all over this Isaac Hayes thing. Interesting read today.
    http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,401321,00.html

  12. sky_capitan says:

    That’s actually a very interesting read from Friedman. It changes my impression of Hayes and what happened to him.

  13. David Poland says:

    Yeah… Roger’s one area of actual expertise is the music business.
    That said, the whole Hayes defense on the South Park thing and Stone’s alleged comments to him don’t actually match what happened. I would be wary of trusting it.
    And of course, Hayes not recognizing Roger is the key moment of deterioration in the man’s life… oy.
    But there is some good stuff in there.

  14. Triple Option says:

    He was by no means a crooner but Mystikal I thought could’ve been one with a “threateningly sexy voice.” He’d spit rhymes w/a real raw sexual engery or powerful furvor but it seemed honest and unabashed not crude or raunchy. He wasn’t smooth like Hayes but I thought he could’ve been one to trademark his voice. His crimes were too serious to hear his strong masculine voice and not be distrubed by the sexual undertone.

  15. Rothchild says:

    “Neither it seems, was Bernie Mac.”
    What does this even mean? Is Roger saying that Bernie wasn’t up for shooting Soul Men because he was going to get pneumonia in the future?

Leave a Reply

The Hot Blog

Quote Unquotesee all »

“I suddenly couldn’t say anything about some of the movies. They were just so terrible, and I’d already written about so many terrible movies. I love writing about movies when I can discover something in them – when I can get something out of them that I can share with people. The week I quit, I hadn’t planned on it. But I wrote up a couple of movies, and I read what I’d written, and it was just incredibly depressing. I thought, I’ve got nothing to share from this. One of them was of that movie with Woody Allen and Bette Midler, Scenes From a Mall. I couldn’t write another bad review of Bette Midler. I thought she was so brilliant, and when I saw her in that terrible production of ‘Gypsy’ on television, my heart sank. And I’d already panned her in Beaches. How can you go on panning people in picture after picture when you know they were great just a few years before? You have so much emotional investment in praising people that when you have to pan the same people a few years later, it tears your spirits apart.”
~ Pauline Kael On Quitting

“My father was a Jerome. My daughter’s middle name is Jerome. But my most vexing and vexed relationship with a Jerome was with Jerome Levitch, the subject of my first book under his stage and screen name, Jerry Lewis.

I have a lot of strong and complex feelings about the man, who passed away today in Las Vegas at age 91. Suffice to say he was a brilliant talent, an immense humanitarian, a difficult boss/interview, and a quixotic sort of genius, as often inspired as insipid, as often tender as caustic.

I wrote all about it in my 1996 book, “King of Comedy,” which is available on Kindle. With all due humility, it’s kinda definitive — the good and the bad — even though it’s two decades old. My favorite review, and one I begged St. Martin’s (unsuccessfully) to put on the paperback jacket, came from “Screw” magazine, which called it “A remarkably fair portrait of a great American asshole.”

Jerry and I met twice while I was working on the book and spoke/wrote to each other perhaps a dozen times. Like many of his relationships with the press and his partners/subordinates, it ended badly, with Jerry hollering profanities at me in the cabin of his yacht in San Diego. I wrote about it in the epilogue to my book, and over the years I’ve had the scene quoted back to me by Steve Martin, Harry Shearer, Paul Provenza and Penn Jillette. Tom Hanks once told me that he had a dinner with Paul Reiser and Martin Short at which Short spent the night imitating Jerry throwing me off the boat.

Jerry was a lot of things: father, husband, chum, businessman, philanthropist, artist, innovator, clown, tyrant. He was at various times in his life the highest-ever-paid performer on TV, in movies, and on Broadway. He raised BILLIONS for charity, invented filmmaking techniques, made perhaps a dozen classic comedies, turned in a terrific dramatic performance in Martin Scorsese’s “The King of Comedy,” and left the world altered and even enhanced with his time and his work in it.

That’s an estimable achievement and one worth pausing to commemorate.

#RIP to Le Roi du Crazy

~ Biographer Shawn Levy on Jerry Lewis on Facebook