MCN Blogs
David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

P-n-P Blog Factory

I was planning on holding an update on The Pete-n-Pat Blog Show for a while. After all, we

7 Responses to “P-n-P Blog Factory”

  1. marychan says:

    I thought that NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN is also very profitable for Paramount Vantage…. isn’t it?

  2. SJRubinstein says:

    Bart’s “The Myths of Comic-Con” was akin to reading an essay on somebody’s first experience with a microwave oven written in 2003.

  3. IOIOIOI says:

    That’s good stuff, SJR. Good stuff.

  4. Chucky in Jersey says:

    “No Country for Old Men” was split between Par and Miramax. So was “There Will Be Blood”.

  5. RocketScientist says:

    NCFOM was wisely marketed by Miramax, deliberately and pointedly so, courtesy both the Coens and Scott Rudin, all of whom were very aware of Vantage’s inabilities (and yes, Poland, I know that Coligan’s husband is Rudin’s head of production – doesn’t change the fact neither Rudin nor the Coens know Vantage ain’t worth it shit when it comes to peddling product; Rudin’s got DOUBT set-up nicely at Miramax and they’ll poise it to sweep the Oscars yet again).
    It is still crazy to me that TWBB lost money … it was one of the few movies Vantage didn’t go to great things to screen 100,000 times, thereby effectively reducing their ticket buying audience exponentially.
    And speaking of that, looks like AMERICAN TEEN will be ARCTIC TALE all over again – an overextended, overexposed campaign of hundreds of screenings that’ll be lucky to amount to $5 million when it’s all said and done. I’m surprised Vantage hasn’t been blown away entirely.

  6. RocketScientist says:

    I’ve been reading too many IOIOIOIOIO posts … forgot how to properly utilize English. Corrections below.
    “I know that Coligan’s husband is Rudin’s head of production – doesn’t change the fact both Rudin and the Coens know Vantage ain’t worth it shit when it comes to peddling product …”
    “It is still crazy to me that TWBB lost money … it was one of the few movies Vantage didn’t go to great lengths to screen 100,000 times, thereby effectively reducing their ticket buying audience exponentially.”

  7. David Poland says:

    The problem with Vantage last year was five movies… without No Country. But the biggest thing was that Lesher didn’t like No Country.
    There is no question. Rudin is more comfortable at Miramax. New York based. Hand in hand with 42 West.
    But Vantage actually pulled every f-ing dime there was to pull out of most of the movies they didn’t dump. Do you really think there was more money in Blood, Babel, Into The Wild or even The Kite Runner or A Mighty Heart? I don’t. No one has ever gotten more out of less doc than they got out of An Inconvenient Truth.
    And the issues around TWBB and how they handled the film were mostly not Vantage issues… ’nuff said.
    Except to say, getting TWBB to a nomination is not an indication that “Vantage ain’t worth it shit when it comes to peddling product.” That was nothing close to a lock as a nomination. And they got there.
    I have to admit, I was pleasantly shocked by how well and quickly Megan adapted to marketing. She is equally underqualified to have moved up at Paramount… but much less so than Lesher himself. And we’ll see how it all plays out. She and Guy are very smart and they know how to manage up.

The Hot Blog

movieman on: BYOBlog

Stella's Boy on: BYOBlog

movieman on: BYOBlog

Hcat on: BYOBlog

movieman on: BYOBlog

leahnz on: BYOBlog

movieman on: BYOBlog

movieman on: BYOBlog

leahnz on: BYOBlog

Stella's Boy on: BYOB - RIP The Goldfinch

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Well, actually, of that whole group that I call the post-60s anti-authority auteurs, a lot of them came from television. Peckinpah’s the only one whose television work represents his feature work. I mean, like the only one. Mark Rydell can direct a really good episode of ‘Gunsmoke’ and Michael Ritchie can direct a really good episode of ‘The Big Valley,’ but they don’t necessarily look like The Candidate. But Peckinpah’s stuff, even the scripts he wrote that he didn’t even direct, have a Peckinpah feel – the way I think there’s a Corbucci West – suggest a Peckinpah West. That even in his random episodes that he wrote for ‘Gunsmoke’ – it’s right there.”
~ Quentin Tarantino

“The thought is interrupted by an odd interlude. We are speaking in the side room of Casita, a swish and fairly busy Italian bistro in Aoyama – a district of Tokyo usually so replete with celebrities that they spark minimal fuss. Kojima’s fame, however, exceeds normal limits and adoring staff have worked out who their guest is. He stops mid-sentence and points up towards the speakers, delighted. The soft jazz that had been playing discreetly across the restaurant’s dark, hardwood interior has suddenly been replaced with the theme music from some of Kojima’s hit games. Harry Gregson-Williams’ music is sublime in its context but ‘Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots’ is not, Kojima acknowledges, terribly restauranty. He pauses, adjusting a pair of large, blue-framed glasses of his own design, and returns to the way in which games have not only influenced films, but have also changed the way in which people watch them. “There are stories being told [in cinema] that my generation may find surprising but which the gamer generation doesn’t find weird at all,” he says.
~ Hideo Kojima