MCN Blogs
Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Northern promises: Penguin Canada gets Cronenberg novel

knowingly.jpgType, type, type, eh, Mr. Cronenberg? News comes that he can multitask as constructively as any man, beast or bug. Penguin Canada announces a debut novel from the director of Eastern Promises. “Penguin Group Canada has acquired a debut novel from internationally acclaimed film director David Cronenberg in an exciting pre-empt from agent Andrew Wylie of the Wylie Agency. Cronenberg, best known for his work in the body horror genre, is one of the few Canadian directors who can claim an international legion of fans… In 1999, Cronenberg was inducted onto Canada’s Walk of Fame. In 2002, he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada. In 2006, he was awarded the Cannes Film Festival’s lifetime achievement award and was made a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. Winstanley says, “I wrote David Cronenberg several months ago to inquire about whether or not he’d consider writing a novel. His films demonstrate a deep understanding of the human condition that could translate into fiction brilliantly so I’m delighted that he has decided to take this challenge on and I’m really looking forward to working with him.” … The untitled novel is not being described at this time but is partially set in Toronto and scheduled for publication in early 2010. Said Cronenberg last week in Toronto: “I’ve literally been waiting fifty years to do this. I’m excited.” [Complete PR at the jump.]


For Immediate Release – November 25, 2007 – Penguin Canada acquires Cronenberg novel
Nicole Winstanley, Executive Editor at Penguin Group Canada has acquired a debut novel from internationally acclaimed film director David Cronenberg in an exciting pre-empt from agent Andrew Wylie of the Wylie Agency.
Cronenberg, best known for his work in the body horror genre, is one of the few Canadian directors who can claim an international legion of fans. His critically acclaimed films include The Dead Zone (1983), The Fly (1986), Dead Ringers (1988), Naked Lunch (1991), M. Butterfly (1993), Crash (1996), eXistenZ (1999), Spider (2002), A History of Violence (2005) and Eastern Promises (2007). In 1999, Cronenberg was inducted onto Canada’s Walk of Fame. In 2002, he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada. In 2006, he was awarded the Cannes Film Festival’s lifetime achievement award and was made a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.
Winstanley says, “I wrote David Cronenberg several months ago to inquire about whether or not he’d consider writing a novel. His films demonstrate a deep understanding of the human condition that could translate into fiction brilliantly so I’m delighted that he has decided to take this challenge on and I’m really looking forward to working with him.”
David Cronenberg was born and lives in Toronto, and graduated from the University of Toronto with a degree in literature after switching from science. He released his first feature film (Shivers) in 1975 and over the arc of his career has gone beyond the horror genre to explore themes including the paranormal, the intrusion of visual media, biology, technology, identity and the psychology of delusion. The untitled novel is not being described at this time but is partially set in Toronto and scheduled for publication in early 2010.
Said Cronenberg last week in Toronto: “I’ve literally been waiting fifty years to do this. I’m excited.”
Founded in 1974 as a distribution company for Penguin books from all over the world, Penguin Group (Canada) began publishing Canadian and international titles in 1977, and quickly became known as one of Canada’s pre-eminent publishers of literary, thought-provoking fiction, and non-fiction. Among its authors, Penguin Canada proudly publishes Canadian fiction writers Joseph Boyden, Alice Munro, Stuart McLean, Donna Morrissey, Michael Winter, Colin McAdam, Jack Todd, Will Ferguson, and Guy Gavriel Kay.
– 30 –

Comments are closed.

Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Would I like to see Wormwood in a theater on a big screen? You betcha. I’d be disingenuous to argue otherwise. But we’re all part of, like it or not, an industry, and what Netflix offers is an opportunity to do different kinds of films in different ways. Maybe part of what is being sacrificed is that they no longer go into theaters. If the choice is between not doing it at all and having it not go to theaters, it’s an easy choice to make.”
~ Errol Morris

“As these stories continue to break, in the weeks since women have said they were harassed and abused by Harvey Weinstein, which was not the birth of a movement but an easy and highly visible shorthand for decades of organizing against sexual harassment that preceded this moment, I hope to gain back my time, my work. Lately, though, I have noticed a drift in the discourse from violated rights to violated feelings: the swelled number of reporters on the beat, the burden on each woman’s story to concern a man “important” enough to report on, the detailed accounting of hotel robes and incriminating texts along with a careful description of what was grabbed, who exposed what, and how many times. What I remember most, from “my story” is how small the sex talk felt, almost dull. I did not feel hurt. I had no pain to confess in public. As more stories come out, I like to think that we would also believe a woman who said, for example, that the sight of the penis of the man who promised her work did not wound her, and that the loss she felt was not some loss of herself but of her time, energy, power.”
~ “The Unsexy Truth About Harassment,” by Melissa Gira Grant