MCN Blogs
David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

New Idea

This came via e-mail with a 5mg attachment that I can’t recreate on the blog. But interesting…
November 20, 2007
Dear Broadcast Film Critic member,
We are pleased to send you a downloadable MP3 of

12 Responses to “New Idea”

  1. TMJ says:

    What’s interesting, DP? It seems like a smart way to reach savvy BFCA voters.

  2. Alan Cerny says:

    I’m confused about how this song is eligible since it was on two different CDs before the film was released. Anyone want to enlighten me?

  3. Alan Cerny says:

    Can someone enlighten me on how “Falling Slowly” is eligible when it was on two different CDs before the film came out? I have no problems with it being nominated, but I thought the eligibility rules for songs were strict in that they had to be created specifically for the film.

  4. Moviezzz says:

    I was about to say the same thing. While I love the song and the movie, it was a recorded and released on an album (THE SWELL SEASON) before the film.
    Since Oscar music has some of the strictest criteria, I wouldn’t think it would be eligible.

  5. montrealkid says:

    What’s interesting is that in this paranoid age of piracy a major studio would choose to EMAIL an mp3 file to critics (that of course, could be forwarded to anyone they so choose).

  6. aframe says:

    “Falling Slowly” was written and recorded for the film in early ’96, and then the versions on THE SWELL SEASON album and the one Hansard recorded with The Frames were done. There was some talk about this during the summer as Searchlight was working with the Academy to determine which tunes were eligible, and the song passed the test since the song was written and recorded especially for the film, which just happened to be released after the other version–remember there was some doubt as to what type of release the film would receive, if any, so they hedged their bets and later included it in other works.

  7. aframe says:

    oops, I meant early ’06.

  8. aframe says:

    oops, I meant early ’06. In any event, there was an article I remember reading that cleared up the whole timeline.

  9. Kambei says:

    It was written & recorded specifically for the film, along with several other tracks. I would also love to see “If you want me” or “when your mind’s made up” make the final cut. For once, the song category should be pretty crowded and competitive this year.

  10. aframe says:

    Actually, the only two tunes Searchlight is pushing per what’s printed on the awards screener are “Falling Slowly” and “If You Want Me”–I’m assuming they didn’t want to split the vote too much.

  11. crazycris says:

    They must definitely not be worried about piracy… because Falling Slowly is available for download on the movie’s website!
    Which I was more than delighted to discover after coming home from seeing the film last night! What a delightful story and beautiful music! More than worthy of the oscar for this song!!!
    Movie music aside, discovering The Frames is an added bonus! I just picked up their two most recent albums from the library…

  12. Yeah, the songs were written for the film, but because it took so long to get a release they received an album release beforehand.
    Which is sort of the opposite of “Come What May”, which was written for Romeo + Juliet but never recorded and then it was for Moulin Rouge! and was deemed ineligible.

Leave a Reply

Quote Unquotesee all »

DEADLINE: How does a visualist feel about people watching your films on a phone or VOD?
REFN: It depends on what kind of movie you make. We had great success with Only God Forgives on multiple platforms in the U.S. Young people will decide how they see it, when they want to see it. Don’t try to fight it. Embrace it. That’s a wonderful opportunity. We’re at the most exciting time since the invention of the wheel, in terms of creativity because distribution and accessibility have changed everything. A camera is still a camera whether it’s digital or not; there’s still sound; an actor is an actor. Ninety-nine percent of what you do is going to be seen on a smart phone – I know this is the greatest thing ever made because it allows people to choose, watching what you do on this format or go into a theater and see it on a screen. That means more people than ever will see what I do, which is personally satisfying in terms of vanity. But you have to be able to adapt, to accept things in different order and length than we’re used to. We are in a very, very exciting time.
~ Nic Refn to Jen Yamato

DEADLINE: You mention Tarantino, who with Christopher Nolan and a few other giants, saved film stock from extinction. To him, showing a digital film in a theater is the equivalent of watching TV in public. Make an argument for why digital is a good film making canvas.
REFN: Costwise, it’s a very effective way for young people to start making movies. You can make your movie on an iPhone. It’s wonderful seeing how my own children use technology to enhance creativity. For me it’s a wonderful canvas. Sure, I love grain in film. I love celluloid. But I also like creativity. I like crayons, I like pencils, I like paint. It’s all relative. Technology is more inclusive. A hundred years ago when film was invented, it was an elitist club. Very few people got to make it, very few people controlled it and very few people owned it. A hundred years later, storytelling through images is everyone’s domain. It’s ultimate capitalism. There are no rules, and no barriers and no Hays Code. Where does this go in another hundred years? I don’t know but I would love to see it.
~ Nic Refn To Jen Yamato