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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

New Idea

This came via e-mail with a 5mg attachment that I can’t recreate on the blog. But interesting…
November 20, 2007
Dear Broadcast Film Critic member,
We are pleased to send you a downloadable MP3 of

12 Responses to “New Idea”

  1. TMJ says:

    What’s interesting, DP? It seems like a smart way to reach savvy BFCA voters.

  2. Alan Cerny says:

    I’m confused about how this song is eligible since it was on two different CDs before the film was released. Anyone want to enlighten me?

  3. Alan Cerny says:

    Can someone enlighten me on how “Falling Slowly” is eligible when it was on two different CDs before the film came out? I have no problems with it being nominated, but I thought the eligibility rules for songs were strict in that they had to be created specifically for the film.

  4. Moviezzz says:

    I was about to say the same thing. While I love the song and the movie, it was a recorded and released on an album (THE SWELL SEASON) before the film.
    Since Oscar music has some of the strictest criteria, I wouldn’t think it would be eligible.

  5. montrealkid says:

    What’s interesting is that in this paranoid age of piracy a major studio would choose to EMAIL an mp3 file to critics (that of course, could be forwarded to anyone they so choose).

  6. aframe says:

    “Falling Slowly” was written and recorded for the film in early ’96, and then the versions on THE SWELL SEASON album and the one Hansard recorded with The Frames were done. There was some talk about this during the summer as Searchlight was working with the Academy to determine which tunes were eligible, and the song passed the test since the song was written and recorded especially for the film, which just happened to be released after the other version–remember there was some doubt as to what type of release the film would receive, if any, so they hedged their bets and later included it in other works.

  7. aframe says:

    oops, I meant early ’06.

  8. aframe says:

    oops, I meant early ’06. In any event, there was an article I remember reading that cleared up the whole timeline.

  9. Kambei says:

    It was written & recorded specifically for the film, along with several other tracks. I would also love to see “If you want me” or “when your mind’s made up” make the final cut. For once, the song category should be pretty crowded and competitive this year.

  10. aframe says:

    Actually, the only two tunes Searchlight is pushing per what’s printed on the awards screener are “Falling Slowly” and “If You Want Me”–I’m assuming they didn’t want to split the vote too much.

  11. crazycris says:

    They must definitely not be worried about piracy… because Falling Slowly is available for download on the movie’s website!
    Which I was more than delighted to discover after coming home from seeing the film last night! What a delightful story and beautiful music! More than worthy of the oscar for this song!!!
    Movie music aside, discovering The Frames is an added bonus! I just picked up their two most recent albums from the library…

  12. Yeah, the songs were written for the film, but because it took so long to get a release they received an album release beforehand.
    Which is sort of the opposite of “Come What May”, which was written for Romeo + Juliet but never recorded and then it was for Moulin Rouge! and was deemed ineligible.

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“When Bay keeps these absurd plot-gears spinning, he’s displaying his skill as a slick, professional entertainer. But then there are the images of motion—I hesitate to say, of things in motion, because it’s not clear how many things there are in the movie, instead of mere digital simulations of things. It doesn’t matter. What matters is that there’s a car chase through London, seen from the level of tires, that could have gone on for an hour, um, tirelessly. What matters is that the defenestrated Cade saves himself by leaping from drone to drone in midair like a frog skipping among lotus pads; that he and Vivian slide along the colossal, polished expanses of sharply tilting age-old fields of metal like luge Olympians. What matters is that, when this heroic duo find themselves thrust out into the void of inner space from a collapsing planet, it has a terrifyingly vast emptiness that Bay doesn’t dare hold for more than an instant lest he become the nightmare-master. What matters is that the enormous thing hurtling toward Earth is composed in a fanatical detail that would repay slow-motion viewing with near-geological patience. Bay has an authentic sense of the gigantic; beside the playful enormity of his Transformerized universe, the ostensibly heroic dimensions of Ridley Scott’s and Christopher Nolan’s massive visions seem like petulant vanities.”
~ Michael Bay Gives Richard Brody A Tingle

How do you see film evolving in this age of Netflix?

I thought the swing would be quicker and more violent. There have been two landmark moments in the history of French film. First in 1946, with the creation of the CNC under the aegis of Malraux. He saved French cinema by establishing the advance on receipts and support fund mechanisms. We’re all children of this political invention. Americans think that the State gives money to French films, but they’re wrong. Through this system, films fund themselves!

The other great turning point came by the hand of Jack Lang in the 1980s, after the creation of Canal+. While television was getting ready to become the nemesis of film, he created the decoder, and a specific broadcasting space between film and television, using new investments for film. That once again saved French film.

These political decisions are important. We’re once again facing big change. If our political masters don’t take control of the situation and new stakeholders like Netflix, Google and Amazon, we’re headed for disaster. We need to create obligations for Internet service providers. They can’t always be against film. They used to allow piracy, but now that they’ve become producers themselves, they’re starting to see things in a different light. This is a moment of transition, a strong political act needs to be put forward. And it can’t just be at national level, it has to happen at European level.

Filmmaker Cédric Klapisch