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Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Chicago Sun-Times brags on Ebert's "number one pundit" status

RogerSunTimes_7.jpg“Roger Ebert, the Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic of the Chicago Sun-Times, bested them and others to be named the most influential pundit in America by Forbes magazine,” writes Maureen O’Donnell in a front-pager. “Forbes analyzed market research on more than 60 top pundits in current events, entertainment, law, politics and sports. Ebert “appeals to 70 percent of the demographic and [his] long career makes him well known to well over half the population,” wrote Forbes’ Tom Van Riper… The magazine’s list of top pundits is “very impressive company,” Ebert said by e-mail. “It never occurred to me anyone would make such a survey, especially since I never thought of myself as a pundit. . . . Maybe it means movies are more popular than politics, and non-partisan.” … “Despite all my health adventures, I can still see, hear, and type, and now that print reviews are my only way to exercise the full range of my communication abilities, I find I write them with something approaching bliss,” Ebert said…. “As one of my friends observed, ‘Even if you lose your voice, Ebert, you’ve already talked more than enough.’ “

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