MCN Blogs
David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

International Relations

Interesting to take a look at Variety‘s report on the international box office
Pirates 3 is now the biggest grosser outside of North America of the trilogy.
Potter 5 now looks like it will be the #3 Potter film worldwide.
The Simpsons has $230 million international, significantly more than at home.
Transformers has done surprisingly well overseas, with $328 million, topping the domestic gross.
Life Free or Die Hard has grossed $204 million overseas, making it the 7th highest grosser of the summer worldwide, leapfrogging Knocked Up and Ratatouille, though The Rat is out in fewer than half their international markets and should jump past DH4 before year end.
Ocean’s 13 is closing in on $300 million worldwide.

9 Responses to “International Relations”

  1. Aladdin Sane says:

    Why does Disney hold back on Ratatouille for so long? Is this common practice for their animated fare?

  2. jeffmcm says:

    I can’t imagine that Knocked Up will have big international legs.
    Another movie that has made significantly more than it did in the U.S.: Hostel 2, closing in on $60m worldwide (sorry to bring up old wounds).

  3. ployp says:

    In Thailand, school isn’t out until early October. But we’ve had Ratatouille for a few weeks now. (which is unusal as we normally have to wait until October for Pixar movies.)

  4. Aladdin, as Ployp alluded to, many kids films are saved for school holidays. What’s annoying is when Ratatouille opened in America was school holidays here, yet we have to wait until the end of September (I think) to see it. Grrr. During the school holidays (er, there’s four lots of them, three of which are two weeks plus the longer one over Christmas if our system is different) we’re usually inundated with a back catalogue of kids films. Amazing holds for Ratatoiulle in France and Japan though, no matter what the trends are.
    Perhaps a reason for The Simpsons Movie‘s big international is that it rates better? I know in Australia it routinely makes it into the Top 20 programs each week whereas in America it’s barely in the Top 60 (right? or did I read wrong). It’s made $26mil here, which would be the equivelant of $260mil in America. Harry Potter has made $33mil.
    One of the anomolies of Australia’s box office is the European film As It Is In Heaven is #15 after being on the chart for 54 weeks. It was nominated for an Oscar a couple of years back I think. For some reason it’s just still playing. Crazy.

  5. jsnpritchett says:

    Not sure why you think the Transformers international gross is surprising. The toy line started in Japan, and the film is a big-budget action/sci-fi romp–exactly the type of film that typically does well globally.

  6. Wrecktum says:

    “Perhaps a reason for The Simpsons Movie’s big international is that it rates better?”
    That is correct. Simpsons is an excellent overseas TV property for Fox. It’s a big reason why the show is still on the air.

  7. seymourgrant says:

    Hey David,
    I don’t know if you’ve seen this but the-numbers.com now has a weekly DVD sales chart. Is this the start of something? Will DVD sales numbers evolve into the same craziness that surrounds boxoffice numbers? If these numbers were out there more, how would that change the residuals debate? Or would it even?
    http://www.the-numbers.com/dvd/charts/weekly/thisweek.php

  8. There have been DVD/VHS sales/rental charts for a very long time, haven’t there? It’s just that in the last couple of years people have realised sometimes there’s plenty more cash in these areas than there can be in the cinema.

  9. seymourgrant says:

    I’ve seen plenty of DVD sales charts but never one that included actual amounts of money made. Usually they just list what the top selling DVD’s are for the week and maybe how many units were sold if it was a particularly high number which I suspect were studios bragging. But DVD sales numbers is something new to me. DVD’s being cash cows hasn’t been a secret, but the actual money numbers have been kept pretty close to the cuff. Even if this list is just an educated guess, where is all this heading? Is Katie Couric going to be ‘reporting’ DVD sales numbers on the evening news as if it was the weekend box office? Watercooler talk, “Man, Wild Hogs made $50 million in DVD sales.”

Leave a Reply

Box Office

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Any time a movie causes a country to threaten nuclear retaliation, the higher-ups wanna get in a room with you… In terms of getting the word out about the movie, it’s not bad. If they actually make good on it, it would be bad for the world—but luckily that doesn’t seem like their style… We’ll make a movie that maybe for two seconds will make some 18-year-old think about North Korea in a way he never would have otherwise. Or who knows? We were told one of the reasons they’re so against the movie is that they’re afraid it’ll actually get into North Korea. They do have bootlegs and stuff. Maybe the tapes will make their way to North Korea and cause a fucking revolution. At best, it will cause a country to be free, and at worst, it will cause a nuclear war. Big margin with this movie.”
~ Seth Rogen In Rolling Stone 1224

“Yes, good movies sprout up, inevitably, in the cracks and seams between the tectonic plates on which all of these franchises stay balanced, and we are reassured of their hardiness. But we don’t see what we don’t see; we don’t see the effort, or the cost of the effort, or the movies of which we’re deprived because of the cost of the effort. Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice may have come from a studio, but it still required a substantial chunk of outside financing, and at $35 million, it’s not even that expensive. No studio could find the $8.5 million it cost Dan Gilroy to make Nightcrawler. Birdman cost a mere $18 million and still had to scrape that together at the last minute. Imagine American movie culture for the last few years without Her or Foxcatcher or American Hustle or The Master or Zero Dark Thirty and it suddenly looks markedly more frail—and those movies exist only because of the fairy godmothership of independent producer Megan Ellison. The grace of billionaires is not a great business model on which to hang the hopes of an art form.”
~ Mark Harris On The State Of The Movies