MCN Columnists
Leonard Klady

By Leonard Klady Klady@moviecitynews.com

Dough Nut …

July 29, 2007
Weekend Estimates
Domestic Market Share

“Why,” asks Homer Simpson rhetorically, “would anyone go to the theater to see something they could see on TV?” Answer (diplomatically): Because it’s bigger, man.

The Simpsons Movie earned its big screen stripes with an estimated $71.2 million, roughly 40% of all ticket sales in the domestic marketplace. The unlikely American sweethearts created a sizeable boost in movie going leaving a trio of other national debuts scurrying for spill over business.

The kitchen romantic comedy No Reservations basted together a respectable $11.5 million to rank sixth but other newcomers suffered from the competition. The Lindsay Lohan chiller I Know Who Killed Me (why would anyone go to the theater to see something they could see on TV) eked out $3.4 million and the golf comedy Who’s Your Caddy? nipped into the top 10 with $2.8 million.

The frame also saw a torrent of limited releases including good results of $30,400 for French import Moliere in six venues and a single screen gross of $17,100 for This is England. The frame was heavy with non-fiction fare that ranged from Iraq (No End in Sight) and Darfur (The Devil Came on Horseback) to Vietnam protest (The Camden 28), ecology (Arctic Tale) and a bygone Hollywood scandal (Girl 27).

It was clear that The Simpsons Movie would be the top ranked film in the marketplace but none of the industry’s tracking services saw a top end of more than $55 million and most predicted about $10 million lower. Obviously its considerable fan base couldn’t wait to see the yellow-faced clan and put down enough change to generate the third highest opening gross for an animated feature behind the second and third installments of Shrek.

And if there was any question of the series’ global reach, its launch in 71 international territories silenced that discussion. Sunday estimates are projecting a $96 million gross with record-breaking animation openings in Germany and Australia and not too shabby returns in England, France, Spain and Korea.

Marking on the curve, both I Now Pronounce You Chuck & Larry and Hairspray‘s second weekend’s held well. The overall weekend total approached $180 million for a 17% hike from the immediate prior frame. It exceeded the 2006 tally by 39% when Miami Vice debuted to $25.7 million. The current season has evidenced a strong second wind that should continue with upcoming third installments of Rush Hour and Bourne in the wings.

No Reservations, based on the German film Mostly Martha, positioned itself as an adult alternative to The Simpsons and audiences decided to nibble on its modest offerings. However, Sony approached I Know Who Killed Me like a hot potato when its headliner Lindsay Lohan received a harsh media spotlight for her extracurricular activity.

There was also scant interest for Who’s Your Caddy?, an unofficial update of Caddyshack with the country club intruder coming from the ranks of rap music.

The session also saw good but not great expansions for both Rescue Dawn and Sunshine. In the present crowded marketplace it’s unlikely either of the highly lauded pictures has a chance of upping the ante as high as 1,000 playdates.

In the niches there were a number of surprises that included a potent single screen gross of $23,600 for the American indie Transformation and the aptly titled Iraq war documentary No End in Sightgenerating a roughly $15,000 screen average from two venues.

– Leonard Klady

Weekend Estimates – July 27-29, 2007

Title
Distributor
Gross (average)
% chang
Theater
Cume
The Simpson Movie
Fox
71.2 (18,160)
3922
71.2
I Now Pronounce You Chuck &
Uni
19.1 (5,470)
-44%
3501
71.7
Harry Potter & the Order of the
WB
17.3 (4,320)
-47%
4005
242
Hairspray
New Line
15.6 (5,000)
-43%
3121
59.4
Transformers
Par
11.5 (3,430)
-44%
3349
284.5
No Reservations
WB
11.5 (4,730)
2425
11.5
Ratatouille
BV
7.3 (2,470)
-33%
2934
179.7
Live Free or Die Hard
Fox
5.2 (2,310)
-26%
2271
125
I Know Who Killed Me
Sony
3.4 (2,550)
1320
3.4
Who’s Your Caddy?
MGM
2.8 (2,790)
1019
2.8
Rescue Dawn
MGM
1.5 (3,040)
334%
500
2.8
License to Wed
WB
1.3 (810)
-63%
1610
41.7
Sunshine
Searchlight
1.2 (2,690)
410%
460
1.6
Knocked Up
Uni
1.1 (1,440)
-50%
792
145.1
1408
MGM
1.1 (1,090)
-59%
981
69.9
Evan Almighty
Uni
1.0 (1,020)
-60%
1010
96.2
Sicko
LGF/Alliance
1.0 (1,190)
-48%
850
21.3
Talk to Me
Focus
.77 (6,690)
116%
115
1.9
Shrek the Third
Par
.53 (1,160)
38%
455
319.7
Weekend Total ($500,000+ Films)
$174.50
% Change (Last Year)
39%
% Change (Last Week)
17%
Also debuting/expanding
Moliere
Sony Classics
30,400 (5,070)
6
0.03
No End in Sight
Magnolia
29,900 (14,950)
2
0.03
Transformation
Reel Diva
23,650 (23,650)
1
0.02
Arctic Tale
Par Vantage
19,350 (4,840)
4
0.02
This is England
IFC
17,200 (17,200)
1
0.02
The Devil Came on Horseback
Break Thru
10,050 (10,050)
1
0.01
The Camden 28
1st Run
3,600 (3,600)
1
0.01
Girl 27
Westlake
2,100 (2,100)
1
0.01

Top Domestic Grossers: To July 26, 2007

Title
Distributor
Gross
Spider-Man 3
Sony
335,798,600
Shrek the Third
Par
319,201,132
Pirates of the Caribbean: At
BV
306,483,088
Transformers
Par
273,034,005
Harry Potter & the Order of th
WB
224,706,129
300
WB
210,702,543
Ratatouille
BV
172,448,802
Wild Hogs
BV
168,100,227
Knocked Up
Uni
143,935,350
Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silve
Fox
129,289,364
Night at the Museum *
Fox
125,041,114
Live Free or Die Hard
Fox
119,777,661
Blades of Glory
Par
118,542,791
Ghost Rider
Sony
117,257,346
Ocean’s Thirteen
WB
115,077,496
Meet the Robinsons
BV
97,206,741
Norbit
Par
95,908,391
Evan Almighty
Uni
95,186,730
Bridge to Terabithia
BV
82,361,273
Disturbia
Par
79,970,004
* does not include 2006 box office

Domestic Market Share: To July 26, 2007

Distributor (Releases)
Gross
Market Share
Paramount (14)
1123.9
19.70%
Sony (17)
881.3
15.50%
Buena Vista (14)
872.5
15.30%
Warner Bros. (21)
872.1
15.30%
Fox (15)
530.1
9.30%
Universal (12) 513.2 9.00%
MGM (14) 180.3 3.20%
New Line (7) 152.7 2.70%
Lions Gate (12) 120.9 2.10%
Fox Searchlight (11) 83.5 1.50%
Focus (4) 53.5 0.90%
Picturehouse (3) 45.8 0.80%
Miramax (6) 44.3 0.80%
Par Vantage (4) 34.5 0.60%
Sony Classics (12) 33.2 0.60%
Other * (157) 154.4 2.70%
* none greater than 0.5% 5696.2 100.00%

Leave a Reply

Klady

Quote Unquotesee all »

“I suddenly couldn’t say anything about some of the movies. They were just so terrible, and I’d already written about so many terrible movies. I love writing about movies when I can discover something in them – when I can get something out of them that I can share with people. The week I quit, I hadn’t planned on it. But I wrote up a couple of movies, and I read what I’d written, and it was just incredibly depressing. I thought, I’ve got nothing to share from this. One of them was of that movie with Woody Allen and Bette Midler, Scenes From a Mall. I couldn’t write another bad review of Bette Midler. I thought she was so brilliant, and when I saw her in that terrible production of ‘Gypsy’ on television, my heart sank. And I’d already panned her in Beaches. How can you go on panning people in picture after picture when you know they were great just a few years before? You have so much emotional investment in praising people that when you have to pan the same people a few years later, it tears your spirits apart.”
~ Pauline Kael On Quitting

“My father was a Jerome. My daughter’s middle name is Jerome. But my most vexing and vexed relationship with a Jerome was with Jerome Levitch, the subject of my first book under his stage and screen name, Jerry Lewis.

I have a lot of strong and complex feelings about the man, who passed away today in Las Vegas at age 91. Suffice to say he was a brilliant talent, an immense humanitarian, a difficult boss/interview, and a quixotic sort of genius, as often inspired as insipid, as often tender as caustic.

I wrote all about it in my 1996 book, “King of Comedy,” which is available on Kindle. With all due humility, it’s kinda definitive — the good and the bad — even though it’s two decades old. My favorite review, and one I begged St. Martin’s (unsuccessfully) to put on the paperback jacket, came from “Screw” magazine, which called it “A remarkably fair portrait of a great American asshole.”

Jerry and I met twice while I was working on the book and spoke/wrote to each other perhaps a dozen times. Like many of his relationships with the press and his partners/subordinates, it ended badly, with Jerry hollering profanities at me in the cabin of his yacht in San Diego. I wrote about it in the epilogue to my book, and over the years I’ve had the scene quoted back to me by Steve Martin, Harry Shearer, Paul Provenza and Penn Jillette. Tom Hanks once told me that he had a dinner with Paul Reiser and Martin Short at which Short spent the night imitating Jerry throwing me off the boat.

Jerry was a lot of things: father, husband, chum, businessman, philanthropist, artist, innovator, clown, tyrant. He was at various times in his life the highest-ever-paid performer on TV, in movies, and on Broadway. He raised BILLIONS for charity, invented filmmaking techniques, made perhaps a dozen classic comedies, turned in a terrific dramatic performance in Martin Scorsese’s “The King of Comedy,” and left the world altered and even enhanced with his time and his work in it.

That’s an estimable achievement and one worth pausing to commemorate.

#RIP to Le Roi du Crazy

~ Biographer Shawn Levy on Jerry Lewis on Facebook