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By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Protect this: Ukraine dubbing imported pix

A large percentage of all movie imports to Ukraine will have to be dubbed into Ukrainian, Kyiv Post reports. Map of Ukraine.gif“Authorities warned film distributors Wednesday that they will face punishment if they do not abide by new guidelines stating that half of all foreign movies shown in the nation’s theaters must be translated into Ukrainian. Amid persistent disputes in the ex-Soviet republic over language use, the state cinematographic service and film distributors signed a memorandum last week setting the rules. Movie distributors, who mainly buy films in Russia, have complained of financial losses and many in the largely Russian-speaking east and south have not been translating movies into Ukrainian… Language is a sensitive issue in Ukraine, where Russian was heavily promoted during the Soviet era, and nationalists see protecting and promoting the Ukrainian language as a way to prevent meddling from Moscow. President Viktor Yushchenko has said all foreign movies – which in Ukrainian theaters are typically are shown dubbed into Russian – should be translated into Ukrainian… The Party of the Regions, whose head, Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych, enjoys strong support in the east and south, campaigned in elections last year on a promise to make Russian a second state language. Six regional governments in the east and south, where Russian is mainly spoken, earlier this year granted Russian a special status – decisions that were heavily criticized by Yushchenko.”

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“As these stories continue to break, in the weeks since women have said they were harassed and abused by Harvey Weinstein, which was not the birth of a movement but an easy and highly visible shorthand for decades of organizing against sexual harassment that preceded this moment, I hope to gain back my time, my work. Lately, though, I have noticed a drift in the discourse from violated rights to violated feelings: the swelled number of reporters on the beat, the burden on each woman’s story to concern a man “important” enough to report on, the detailed accounting of hotel robes and incriminating texts along with a careful description of what was grabbed, who exposed what, and how many times. What I remember most, from “my story” is how small the sex talk felt, almost dull. I did not feel hurt. I had no pain to confess in public. As more stories come out, I like to think that we would also believe a woman who said, for example, that the sight of the penis of the man who promised her work did not wound her, and that the loss she felt was not some loss of herself but of her time, energy, power.”
~ “The Unsexy Truth About Harassment,” by Melissa Gira Grant