Dallas-Ft. Worth Film Critics

2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012

Best Picture
United 93

Best Director
Martin Scorsese, The Departed

Best Actor
Forest Whitaker, Last King of Scotland

Best Actress
Helen Mirren, The Queen

Best Supporting Actress
Cate Blanchett, Notes On A Scandal

Best Supporting Actor
Jackie Earle Haley, Little Children

Best Foreign Language
Letters From Iwo Jima

Best Documentary
An Inconvenient Truth

Best Animated Film
Happy Feet

Best Cinematography
Dean Semler, Apocalypto

Top Ten Movies
United 93
The Departed
Little Miss Sunshine
The Queen
Babel
Letters From Iwo Jima
Dreamgirls
Blood Diamond
Little Chilcren
Flags of our Fathers

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“I don’t know, because I don’t know much about those cameras. I know that’s been a complaint, but I wouldn’t know. Film is what worked for this film. I have a fear of the unknown. I’ve spent a long time trying to learn one camera, and to fucking stop and try to learn another one… I would have to stop for 20 years! I’m a slow learner; I’d have to go through the manual, it would be starting over. So there’s that, too. It’s an issue for filmmakers, and it’s on people’s minds, and I have to say that it’s a lot more challenging and difficult just to kind of get somebody to show film or to print film. It’s far more challenging than it should be right now, and we’re just trying to keep it alive a little bit and create a little pocket where it can be shown that way in various places across the country right now.”
~ Paul Thomas Anderson To David Ehrlich On The Prospect Of Switching From Film

“Almodóvar–the first name is almost unnecessary–is a genius, is a flower, is a guiding light: the last, best son of Buñuel and so much more than that. His screenplays, which he directs with passion and fine care, have taught us about the exteriors of his native land and the interiors of our own hearts. From the early, manic experimental Super-8 work to the breakthrough Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, his titles are as evocative as most people’s screenplays. Yet for all their antic energy, Almodóvar’s films are deeply spiritual: watching his disturbing, mysterious, heart-rending Talk to Her is to understand, perhaps for the first time, the full meaning of grace. An Almodóvar screenplay is a running leap off a Gaudi balcony, it flips, soars, ascends, careens, tumbles, falls – always landing, astonishingly and astonished, on its feet.”
~ Howard A. Rodman, Announcing Almodóvar’s Jean Renoir Award