Dallas-Ft. Worth Film Critics

2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012

Best Picture
United 93

Best Director
Martin Scorsese, The Departed

Best Actor
Forest Whitaker, Last King of Scotland

Best Actress
Helen Mirren, The Queen

Best Supporting Actress
Cate Blanchett, Notes On A Scandal

Best Supporting Actor
Jackie Earle Haley, Little Children

Best Foreign Language
Letters From Iwo Jima

Best Documentary
An Inconvenient Truth

Best Animated Film
Happy Feet

Best Cinematography
Dean Semler, Apocalypto

Top Ten Movies
United 93
The Departed
Little Miss Sunshine
The Queen
Babel
Letters From Iwo Jima
Dreamgirls
Blood Diamond
Little Chilcren
Flags of our Fathers

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“A lot of us felt blindsided,” Van Vliet told me. In the seventies, Van Vliet was drafted out of film school by Industrial Light & Magic, where he worked on The Empire Strikes Back and Raiders of the Lost Ark. Now 62 and semi-retired, he said, “Once you get into your fifties, you’re pretty disposable.” Van Vliet was in the middle of reviewing DVD screeners before casting his Oscar votes, a process he estimated would take a hundred and twenty hours. “The Academy is essentially asking us to give them three weeks of labor, and then they’re going to take our results, put them into a ceremony, and sell it,” he said, referring to the seventy-five million dollars that the organization earns from the television broadcast. “Then they’re turning around and kicking us in the teeth.”
~ “Shakeup At The Oscars”

“Richard Schickel was a very perceptive critic and a wonderful writer and documentary filmmaker. As a person he was, to use a once popular term, ‘crusty,’ and he could be brutally funny. But it’s his deep and abiding love of movies that I’ll always remember about him. His early 70s PBS series ‘The Men Who Made the Movies,’ his 2004 restoration of Sam Fuller’s The Big Red One, his wonderful little book about ‘Double Indemnity,’ his biographies of Chaplin and Cary Grant… this is a man who gave his life to the thing he loved.”
~ Martin Scorsese