MCN Blogs
Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Bollywood today: I do not think we can claim to be in the same league as Hollywood on exploitation

krrish-movie.jpgBollywood’s success is leading to Western greed, Reuters reports from Mumbai in the dispatch, “Bollywood toys with spinoffs.” “For decades, Bollywood was happy just to sell filmgoers a 20-rupee (US50c) cinema ticket. Now studios, tentatively evolving from dynastic family firms to Hollywood-style companies with a taste for merchandising, are increasingly trying to market everything from movie hero action figures to mobile phone ringtones of film soundtrack snippets. Krrish, Bollywood’s all-singing, all-dancing, black-caped answer to Superman, was perhaps the industry’s most full-on attempt yet to cash in on merchandising…” After seeing 2006’s biggest Bollywood entry, “children could nag their parents to buy them Krrish dolls, Krrish superhero mask, Krrish dartboards, Krrish Rubik’s Cubes, and Krrish school stationery. It is all a contrast to a a few years ago when old-fashioned revenge melodramas played in often dilapidated cinemas… Studios and analysts say the industry is ambitiously aiming at following Hollywood with “media convergence” – the buzzword for plastering a product across a wide array of media such as television, radio, the internet, video games and mobile phones… “The Indian film industry has definitely opened up to exploring various innovative revenue streams,” Siddharth Roy Kapur, marketing and communications chief of… a leading Bollywood studio, said. “However, I do not think we can claim to be in the same league as Hollywood on exploitation of our content amongst non South Asian audiences.” [More stats at the link.]

Comments are closed.

Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Ten years ago at Telluride, I said on a panel that theatrical distribution was dying. It seemed obvious to me. I was surprised how many in the audience violently objected: ‘People will always want to go to the movies!’ That’s true, but it’s also true that theatrical cinema as we once knew it has died. Theatrical cinema is now Event Cinema, just as theatrical plays and musical performances are Events. No one just goes to a movie. It’s a planned occasion. Four types of Event Cinema remain.
1. Spectacle (IMAX-style blockbusters)
2. Family (cartoon like features)
3. Horror (teen-driven), and
4. Film Club (formerly arthouse but now anything serious).

There are isolated pockets like black cinema, romcom, girl’s-night-out, seniors, teen gross-outs, but it’s primarily those four. Everything else is TV. Now I have to go back to episode five of ‘Looming Tower.'”
~ Paul Schrader

“Because of my relative candor on Twitter regarding why I quit my day job, my DMs have overflowed with similar stories from colleagues around the globe. These peeks behind the curtains of film festivals, venues, distributors and funding bodies weren’t pretty. Certain dismal patterns recurred (and resonated): Boards who don’t engage with or even understand their organization’s artistic mission and are insensitive to the diverse neighborhood in which their organization’s venue is located; incompetent founders and/or presidents who create only obstacles, never solutions; unduly empowered, Trumpian bean counters who chip away at the taste and experiences that make organizations’ cultural offerings special; expensive PR teams that don’t bring to the table a bare-minimum familiarity with the rich subcultural art form they’re half-heartedly peddling as “product”; nonprofit arts organizations for whom art now ranks as a distant-second goal behind profit.”
~ Eric Allen Hatch