MCN Blogs
Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Shunning the cricket and going paperless: Carr construes

In his Monday NY Times column, David Carr offers his take on Hollywood studios showing no love to the lowly film cricket, essentially rehashing dozens of recent recaps, tinycricket.giflikely pegged to the $231.8 million worldwide gross Sony leveraged out of The Da Vinci Code. Carr lists three other successes, When a Stranger Calls, Underworld: Evolution and Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Family Reunion, that were not available for preview. afoxic204.jpgWhile the dozen movies not shown to critics this year (namechecked in a raft of articles), have partaken of one form of exploitation or another, Carr opines that “Some movies have been labeled critic-proof, but vast swaths of the industry now seem interested in heading to the market without being turned over with a pointy stick.” The shift from newsprint to the Internet is a large part of Carr’s case. “Even among adults, the time-honored practice of perusing large-print ads and then checking the fine print for listings has been replaced by clicking on the Web.” Along with the requisite nod in the general direction of Snakes on a Plane, and a keen appreciation of how the studios are cutting back on their print advertising budgets, here’s the starkest assertion Carr meanders into:


“[A] new division of Fox Film Entertainment aimed at teenagers, Fox Atomic, will produce eight films a year with a print budget of exactly zero.” Carr partially blames newspapers for the problem, since many “increased rates for movie advertising as other categories fell apart after the dot-com bust [and] may be partly to blame for the prospect of a paperless movie industry.” And what’s a national holiday without quoting Mark Cuban: “I know everyone is trying to make it come true because the cost of print ads could be considered extortion in some jurisdictions.”

Comments are closed.

Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

What about replacing Mr. Spacey with another actor? Mr. Plummer, perhaps.
“That would theoretically be fantastic,” Mr. Rothman said he responded. “But I have supervised 450 movies over the course of my career. And what you are saying is impossible. There is not enough time.”
~ Publicizing Sir Ridley’s Deadline Dash

“Would I like to see Wormwood in a theater on a big screen? You betcha. I’d be disingenuous to argue otherwise. But we’re all part of, like it or not, an industry, and what Netflix offers is an opportunity to do different kinds of films in different ways. Maybe part of what is being sacrificed is that they no longer go into theaters. If the choice is between not doing it at all and having it not go to theaters, it’s an easy choice to make.”
~ Errol Morris