Washington, D.C. Area Film Critics Association

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Nominations: December 9, 2005
Awards: December 12, 2005

Best Actor
Phillip Seymor Hoffman  Capote

Best Actress
Reese Witherspoon Walk the Line

Best Supporting Actor
Paul Giamatti – Cinderella Man

Best Supporting Actress
Amy Adams – Junebug

Best Director
Steven Spielberg  Munich

Best Original Screenplay
Paul Haggis and Bobby Moresco  – Crash

Best Adapted Screenplay
Dan Futterman – Capote

Best Film
Munich/Universal

Best Foreign Film
Kung Fu Hustle/Sony Pictures Classic

Best Animated Feature
Wallace & Gromit in The Curse of the Were-Rabbit/DreamWorks

Best Documentary
Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room/Magnolia Pictures

Best Breakthrough Performance
Terrence Howard – Hustle & Flow

Best Ensemble
Crash/Lions Gate

Best Art Direction
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe/Buena Vista

Nominations
Nominations: December 9, 2005
Awards: December 12, 2005

Best Actor

— Phillip Seymor Hoffman  Capote
— David Strathairn  Good Night, and Good Luck
— Terrence Howard Hustle & Flow
— Joaquin Phoenix  Walk the Line
— Heath Ledger  Brokeback Mountain

Best Actress

— Joan Allen  Upside of Anger
— Felicity Huffman Transamerica
— Reese Witherspoon Walk the Line
— Keira Knightley  Pride and Prejudice
— Charlize Theron  North Country

Best Supporting Actor

— Paul Giamatti – Cinderella Man
— Peter Sarsgaard – Jarhead
— Matt Dillon – Crash
— Geoffrey Rush – Munich
— Terrence Howard – Crash

Best Supporting Actress

— Catherine Keener  Capote
— Michelle Williams  Brokeback Mountain
— Brenda Blethyn  Pride & Prejudice
— Taraji Henson  Hustle & Flow
— Amy Adams  Junebug

Best Director

— George Clooney  Good Night, and Good Luck
— Fernandeo Meirelles The Constant Gardener
— Steven Spielberg  Munich
— Ang Lee  Brokeback Mountain
— Ron Howard  Cinderella Man

Best Original Screenplay

— Paul Haggis and Bobby Moresco  – Crash
— Noah Baumbach – The Squid and the Whale
— George Clooney and Grant Heslov – Good Night, and Good Luck
— Craig Brewer – Hustle & Flow
— Angus MacLachlan – Junebug

Best Adapted Screenplay

— Dan Futterman – Capote
— Larry McMurty and Diana Ossana – Brokeback Mountain
— Arthur Golden, Robin Swicord and Doug Wright – Memoirs of a Geisha
— Deborah Moggach – Pride & Prejudice
— Tony Kushner  – Munich

Best Film

— Crash/Lions Gate
— Good Night and Good Luck/Warner Bros.
— Capote/Sony Pictures Classic
— Munich/Universal
— Brokeback Mountain/Focus Features

Best Foreign Film

— Kung Fu Hustle/Sony Pictures Classic
— Paradise Now/Warner Independent Pictures
— Turtles Can Fly/IFC Films
— Schultze Gets the Blues/Paramount Classics
— Innocent Voices/Slowhand Cinema Releasing

Best Animated Feature

— Chicken Little/Buena Vista
— Madagascar/DreamWorks
— Robots/Twentieth Century Fox
— Corpse Bride/Warner Bros.
— Wallace & Gromit in The Curse of the Were-Rabbit/DreamWorks

Best Documentary

— March of the Penguins/National Geographic
— Grizzly Man/Discovery Channel
— Mad Hot Ballroom/Nickelodeon Movies
— Murderball/MTV Films
— Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room/Magnolia Pictures

Best Breakthrough Performance

— Terrence Howard – Hustle & Flow
— Amy Adams – Junebug
— QOrianka Kilcher – The New World
— Taryn Manning – Hustle & Flow
— Aishwarya Rai – Bride & Prejudice

Best Ensemble

— Good Night and Good Luck/Warner Bros.
— Pride & Prejudice/Focus Features
— Sin City/Dimension Films
— Crash/Lions Gate
— Rent/Columbia

Best Art Direction

— Memoirs of A Geisha/Columbia
— Charlie and the Chocolate Factory/Warner Bros.
— Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire/Warner Bros.
— Star Wars: Episode III-Revenge of the Sith/Twentieth Century Fox
— The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe/Buena Vista

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