Washington, D.C. Area Film Critics Association

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Nominations: December 9, 2005
Awards: December 12, 2005

Best Actor
Phillip Seymor Hoffman  Capote

Best Actress
Reese Witherspoon Walk the Line

Best Supporting Actor
Paul Giamatti – Cinderella Man

Best Supporting Actress
Amy Adams – Junebug

Best Director
Steven Spielberg  Munich

Best Original Screenplay
Paul Haggis and Bobby Moresco  – Crash

Best Adapted Screenplay
Dan Futterman – Capote

Best Film
Munich/Universal

Best Foreign Film
Kung Fu Hustle/Sony Pictures Classic

Best Animated Feature
Wallace & Gromit in The Curse of the Were-Rabbit/DreamWorks

Best Documentary
Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room/Magnolia Pictures

Best Breakthrough Performance
Terrence Howard – Hustle & Flow

Best Ensemble
Crash/Lions Gate

Best Art Direction
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe/Buena Vista

Nominations
Nominations: December 9, 2005
Awards: December 12, 2005

Best Actor

— Phillip Seymor Hoffman  Capote
— David Strathairn  Good Night, and Good Luck
— Terrence Howard Hustle & Flow
— Joaquin Phoenix  Walk the Line
— Heath Ledger  Brokeback Mountain

Best Actress

— Joan Allen  Upside of Anger
— Felicity Huffman Transamerica
— Reese Witherspoon Walk the Line
— Keira Knightley  Pride and Prejudice
— Charlize Theron  North Country

Best Supporting Actor

— Paul Giamatti – Cinderella Man
— Peter Sarsgaard – Jarhead
— Matt Dillon – Crash
— Geoffrey Rush – Munich
— Terrence Howard – Crash

Best Supporting Actress

— Catherine Keener  Capote
— Michelle Williams  Brokeback Mountain
— Brenda Blethyn  Pride & Prejudice
— Taraji Henson  Hustle & Flow
— Amy Adams  Junebug

Best Director

— George Clooney  Good Night, and Good Luck
— Fernandeo Meirelles The Constant Gardener
— Steven Spielberg  Munich
— Ang Lee  Brokeback Mountain
— Ron Howard  Cinderella Man

Best Original Screenplay

— Paul Haggis and Bobby Moresco  – Crash
— Noah Baumbach – The Squid and the Whale
— George Clooney and Grant Heslov – Good Night, and Good Luck
— Craig Brewer – Hustle & Flow
— Angus MacLachlan – Junebug

Best Adapted Screenplay

— Dan Futterman – Capote
— Larry McMurty and Diana Ossana – Brokeback Mountain
— Arthur Golden, Robin Swicord and Doug Wright – Memoirs of a Geisha
— Deborah Moggach – Pride & Prejudice
— Tony Kushner  – Munich

Best Film

— Crash/Lions Gate
— Good Night and Good Luck/Warner Bros.
— Capote/Sony Pictures Classic
— Munich/Universal
— Brokeback Mountain/Focus Features

Best Foreign Film

— Kung Fu Hustle/Sony Pictures Classic
— Paradise Now/Warner Independent Pictures
— Turtles Can Fly/IFC Films
— Schultze Gets the Blues/Paramount Classics
— Innocent Voices/Slowhand Cinema Releasing

Best Animated Feature

— Chicken Little/Buena Vista
— Madagascar/DreamWorks
— Robots/Twentieth Century Fox
— Corpse Bride/Warner Bros.
— Wallace & Gromit in The Curse of the Were-Rabbit/DreamWorks

Best Documentary

— March of the Penguins/National Geographic
— Grizzly Man/Discovery Channel
— Mad Hot Ballroom/Nickelodeon Movies
— Murderball/MTV Films
— Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room/Magnolia Pictures

Best Breakthrough Performance

— Terrence Howard – Hustle & Flow
— Amy Adams – Junebug
— QOrianka Kilcher – The New World
— Taryn Manning – Hustle & Flow
— Aishwarya Rai – Bride & Prejudice

Best Ensemble

— Good Night and Good Luck/Warner Bros.
— Pride & Prejudice/Focus Features
— Sin City/Dimension Films
— Crash/Lions Gate
— Rent/Columbia

Best Art Direction

— Memoirs of A Geisha/Columbia
— Charlie and the Chocolate Factory/Warner Bros.
— Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire/Warner Bros.
— Star Wars: Episode III-Revenge of the Sith/Twentieth Century Fox
— The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe/Buena Vista

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“Ten years ago at Telluride, I said on a panel that theatrical distribution was dying. It seemed obvious to me. I was surprised how many in the audience violently objected: ‘People will always want to go to the movies!’ That’s true, but it’s also true that theatrical cinema as we once knew it has died. Theatrical cinema is now Event Cinema, just as theatrical plays and musical performances are Events. No one just goes to a movie. It’s a planned occasion. Four types of Event Cinema remain.
1. Spectacle (IMAX-style blockbusters)
2. Family (cartoon like features)
3. Horror (teen-driven), and
4. Film Club (formerly arthouse but now anything serious).

There are isolated pockets like black cinema, romcom, girl’s-night-out, seniors, teen gross-outs, but it’s primarily those four. Everything else is TV. Now I have to go back to episode five of ‘Looming Tower.'”
~ Paul Schrader

“Because of my relative candor on Twitter regarding why I quit my day job, my DMs have overflowed with similar stories from colleagues around the globe. These peeks behind the curtains of film festivals, venues, distributors and funding bodies weren’t pretty. Certain dismal patterns recurred (and resonated): Boards who don’t engage with or even understand their organization’s artistic mission and are insensitive to the diverse neighborhood in which their organization’s venue is located; incompetent founders and/or presidents who create only obstacles, never solutions; unduly empowered, Trumpian bean counters who chip away at the taste and experiences that make organizations’ cultural offerings special; expensive PR teams that don’t bring to the table a bare-minimum familiarity with the rich subcultural art form they’re half-heartedly peddling as “product”; nonprofit arts organizations for whom art now ranks as a distant-second goal behind profit.”
~ Eric Allen Hatch