The Southeastern Film Critics Association

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Awards: December 19, 2005

BEST DOCUMENTARY
March of the Penguins
Runner-up – Grizzly Man

BEST ANIMATED FILM
Wallace and Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit
Runner-up – Tim Burton’s Corpse Bride

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
Caché
Runner-up – Kung-fu Hustle

BEST DIRECTOR
Ang Lee, Brokeback Mountain
Runner-up – George Clooney, Good Night, and Good Luck.

BEST ACTOR
Philip Seymour Hoffman, Capote
Runner up – Heath Ledger, Brokeback Mountain

BEST ACTRESS
Felicity Huffman, Transamerica
Runner-up – Reese Witherspoon, Walk the Line

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Paul Giamatti, Cinderella Man
Runner-up – George Clooney, Syriana

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Amy Adams, Junebug
Runner-up – Michelle Williams, Brokeback Mountain

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Paul Haggis and Bobby Moresco, Crash
Runners-up – George Clooney and Grant Herslov, Good Night, and Good Luck.

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Larry McMurtry and Diana Ossana, Brokeback Mountain
Runner-up – Dan Futterman, Capote

SEFCA Top Ten
Brokeback Mountain
Good Night, and Good Luck.
Capote
Crash
A History of Violence
The Constant Gardener
Syriana
Cinderella Man
King Kong
Walk the Line

WYATT AWARD
Junebug
Runner-up – Hustle and Flow

The Wyatt, given in memory of late SEFCA member Gene Wyatt, is awarded a film that captures the spirit of the South. This is the first year a recipient has been chosen.

Forty-two members in nine states (Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia) voted in the 14th annual SEFCA poll.

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“There are critics who see their job as to be on the side of the artist, or in a state of imaginative sympathy or alliance with the artist. I think it’s important for a critic to be populist in the sense that we’re on the side of the public. I think one of the reasons is, frankly, capitalism. Whether you’re talking about restaurants or you’re talking about movies, you’re talking about large-scale commercial enterprises that are trying to sell themselves and market themselves and publicize themselves. A critic is, in a way, offering consumer advice. I think it’s very, very important in a time where everything is commercialized, commodified, and branded, where advertising is constantly bleeding into other forms of discourse, for there to be an independent voice kind of speaking to—and to some extent on behalf of—the public.”
~ A. O. Scott On One Role Of The Critic

“Every night, we’d sit and talk for a long, long time and talk about the process and I knew he was very, very intrigued about what could be happening. Then of course, one of the fascinating things he told me about was how he had readers who were reading for him that never knew it was Stanley Kubrick. So if he heard of a novel, he would send it out to people. I think he did it through newspaper ads at the time. And he would send it out to people and ask for a kind of synopsis or a critique of the novel. And he would read those. And it was done anonymously. But he said there were housewives and there were barristers and all sorts of people doing that. And I thought, yeah, that’s a really good way to open up the possibilities. Because otherwise, you’re randomly looking, walking through a bookstore or an airport. I said, “How many people are doing this?” It was about 30 people.”
~ George Miller’s Conversations With Kubrick