The Southeastern Film Critics Association

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Awards: December 19, 2005

BEST DOCUMENTARY
March of the Penguins
Runner-up – Grizzly Man

BEST ANIMATED FILM
Wallace and Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit
Runner-up – Tim Burton’s Corpse Bride

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
Caché
Runner-up – Kung-fu Hustle

BEST DIRECTOR
Ang Lee, Brokeback Mountain
Runner-up – George Clooney, Good Night, and Good Luck.

BEST ACTOR
Philip Seymour Hoffman, Capote
Runner up – Heath Ledger, Brokeback Mountain

BEST ACTRESS
Felicity Huffman, Transamerica
Runner-up – Reese Witherspoon, Walk the Line

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Paul Giamatti, Cinderella Man
Runner-up – George Clooney, Syriana

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Amy Adams, Junebug
Runner-up – Michelle Williams, Brokeback Mountain

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Paul Haggis and Bobby Moresco, Crash
Runners-up – George Clooney and Grant Herslov, Good Night, and Good Luck.

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Larry McMurtry and Diana Ossana, Brokeback Mountain
Runner-up – Dan Futterman, Capote

SEFCA Top Ten
Brokeback Mountain
Good Night, and Good Luck.
Capote
Crash
A History of Violence
The Constant Gardener
Syriana
Cinderella Man
King Kong
Walk the Line

WYATT AWARD
Junebug
Runner-up – Hustle and Flow

The Wyatt, given in memory of late SEFCA member Gene Wyatt, is awarded a film that captures the spirit of the South. This is the first year a recipient has been chosen.

Forty-two members in nine states (Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia) voted in the 14th annual SEFCA poll.

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“Film criticism as a business operates like the film industry itself: The people in charge like to hire people who remind them of themselves, and those people at the top are by and large straight white dudes (baseball caps are an option). That’s not to say they can’t have wildly diverging opinions on a variety of topics, but privilege comes with blinders that are often hard to acknowledge and even tougher to remove. The past few months have seen some of the most prominent film publications taking on new writers who are for the most part white men: Rolling Stone, Film Comment, Indiewire, and of course, Owen Gleiberman at Variety. Many of them have championed underdog filmmakers, but you can’t get over the sense of gatekeeping going on. Film criticism often feels like the treehouse girls are banned from entering, and it’s not hard to assume the conversations we’re missing out on aren’t exactly centered on women in the business… Our world and our art suffers when we limit the number of perspectives allowed to not only tell the story but to discuss it. Women are no better or worse in their opinions than men, but the key differences we bring allow further dimensions in the narrative. Whether they’re conscious of it or not, the ingrained biases of white maleness will continue unchallenged without contrasting voices under the banner, and the commodification of women’s faces and bodies will exacerbate to increasingly damaging levels.”
~ Ceilidhann

DENNIS COOPER

The next thing that really changed my world and thoroughly influenced my writing were the films of Robert Bresson. When I discovered them in the late seventies, I felt I had found the final ingredient I needed to write the fiction I wanted to write.

INTERVIEWER

What was the final ingredient?

DENNIS COOPER

Recognizing that the films were entirely about emotion and, to me, ­ profoundly moving while, at the same time, stylistically inexpressive and monotonic. On the surface, they were nothing but style, and the style was extremely rigorous to boot, but they seemed almost transparent and purely content driven. Bresson’s use of untrained nonactors influenced my concentration on characters who are amateurs or noncharacters or characters who are ill equipped to handle the job of manning a story line or holding the reader’s attention in a conventional way. Altogether, I think Bresson’s films had the greatest influence on my work of any art I’ve ever encountered. In fact, the first fiction of mine that was ever published was a chapbook called “Antoine Monnier,” which was a god-awful, incompetent attempt to rewrite Bresson’s film Le diable ­probablement as a pornographic novella. So I came to writing novels through a channel that included experimental fiction, poetry, and nonliterary influences pretty much exclusively. I never read normal novels with any real interest or close attention.
~ Dennis Cooper Discovers Bresson

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