The Southeastern Film Critics Association

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Awards: December 19, 2005

BEST DOCUMENTARY
March of the Penguins
Runner-up – Grizzly Man

BEST ANIMATED FILM
Wallace and Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit
Runner-up – Tim Burton’s Corpse Bride

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
Caché
Runner-up – Kung-fu Hustle

BEST DIRECTOR
Ang Lee, Brokeback Mountain
Runner-up – George Clooney, Good Night, and Good Luck.

BEST ACTOR
Philip Seymour Hoffman, Capote
Runner up – Heath Ledger, Brokeback Mountain

BEST ACTRESS
Felicity Huffman, Transamerica
Runner-up – Reese Witherspoon, Walk the Line

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Paul Giamatti, Cinderella Man
Runner-up – George Clooney, Syriana

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Amy Adams, Junebug
Runner-up – Michelle Williams, Brokeback Mountain

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Paul Haggis and Bobby Moresco, Crash
Runners-up – George Clooney and Grant Herslov, Good Night, and Good Luck.

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Larry McMurtry and Diana Ossana, Brokeback Mountain
Runner-up – Dan Futterman, Capote

SEFCA Top Ten
Brokeback Mountain
Good Night, and Good Luck.
Capote
Crash
A History of Violence
The Constant Gardener
Syriana
Cinderella Man
King Kong
Walk the Line

WYATT AWARD
Junebug
Runner-up – Hustle and Flow

The Wyatt, given in memory of late SEFCA member Gene Wyatt, is awarded a film that captures the spirit of the South. This is the first year a recipient has been chosen.

Forty-two members in nine states (Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia) voted in the 14th annual SEFCA poll.

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“The city to me is the only possible vehicle we have to measure human achievement. We’re an urban species now. If you look at Karachi or Mexico City or Hong Kong or London or New York or Yonkers or Baltimore or any of these other places, the pastoral is now a part of human history. We’re either going to figure out how to live together in these increasingly crowded, increasingly multi-cultural population centers or we’re not. We’re either going to get great at this or we’re going to fail as a species.”
~ David Simon

“I wondered how different it would be to write a novel and it’s totally different. It’s very internal. The weird thing about it is that I found that novel-writing was much more like directing than it is like screenwriting. You’re casting it, you’re lighting it, you’re doing the costumes, you’re doing the locations, you’re doing it all yourself as a director would. In screenwriting, you don’t do that stuff. You don’t describe the face of the actor or the character when you’re writing a screenplay because Tom Cruise is going to do it and he doesn’t look like that, whereas in the novel to describe what he is is what he is. The actual act of writing, just like shooting on a set, is a slow slog. It’s going to work every day.”
~ David Cronenberg On Screenplay vs. Novel