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The Southeastern Film Critics Association

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Awards: December 19, 2005

BEST DOCUMENTARY
March of the Penguins
Runner-up – Grizzly Man

BEST ANIMATED FILM
Wallace and Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit
Runner-up – Tim Burton’s Corpse Bride

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
Caché
Runner-up – Kung-fu Hustle

BEST DIRECTOR
Ang Lee, Brokeback Mountain
Runner-up – George Clooney, Good Night, and Good Luck.

BEST ACTOR
Philip Seymour Hoffman, Capote
Runner up – Heath Ledger, Brokeback Mountain

BEST ACTRESS
Felicity Huffman, Transamerica
Runner-up – Reese Witherspoon, Walk the Line

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Paul Giamatti, Cinderella Man
Runner-up – George Clooney, Syriana

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Amy Adams, Junebug
Runner-up – Michelle Williams, Brokeback Mountain

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Paul Haggis and Bobby Moresco, Crash
Runners-up – George Clooney and Grant Herslov, Good Night, and Good Luck.

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Larry McMurtry and Diana Ossana, Brokeback Mountain
Runner-up – Dan Futterman, Capote

SEFCA Top Ten
Brokeback Mountain
Good Night, and Good Luck.
Capote
Crash
A History of Violence
The Constant Gardener
Syriana
Cinderella Man
King Kong
Walk the Line

WYATT AWARD
Junebug
Runner-up – Hustle and Flow

The Wyatt, given in memory of late SEFCA member Gene Wyatt, is awarded a film that captures the spirit of the South. This is the first year a recipient has been chosen.

Forty-two members in nine states (Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia) voted in the 14th annual SEFCA poll.

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“Cyberspace is a literary invention and does not really exist, however much time we spend on the computer every day. There is no such space radically different from the empirical, material room we are sitting in, nor do we leave our bodies behind when we enter it, something one rather tends to associate with drugs or the rapture. But it is a literary construction we tend to believe in; and, like the concept of immaterial labor, there are certainly historical reasons for its appearance at the dawn of postmodernity which greatly transcend the technological fact of computer development or the invention of the Internet.”
~ Fredric Jameson On William Gibson, Cyberspace and “Neuromancer”

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Manohla Dargis on Ted 2

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