National Board of Review

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Awards: December 12, 2005

Best Film
Good Night, And Good Luck

Best Foreign Language Film
Paradise Now

Best Documentary
March of the Penguins

Best Animated Feature
Tim Burton’s Corpse Bride

Best Director
Ang Lee, Brokeback Mountain

Best Actor
Philip Seymour Hoffman, Capote

Best Actress
Felicity Huffman, TransAmerica

Best Supporting Actor
Jake Gyllenhaal, Brokeback Mountain

Best Supporting Actress
Gong Li, Memoirs of a Geisha

Best Acting By An Ensemble
Mrs. Henderson Presents

Breakthrough Performance Actor
Terrence Howard, Crash, Get Rich or Die Tryin’ and Hustle & Flow

Breakthrough Performance Actress
Q’Orianka Kilcher, The New World

Best Directorial Debut
Julian Fellowes, Separate Lies

Best Adapted Screenplay
Stephen Gaghan, Syriana

Best Original Screenplay
Noah Baumbach, The Squid and the Whale

Best Film or Mini-Series Made for Cable TV
Lackawanna Blues

Career Achievement
Jane Fonda

Career Achievement in Film Music Composition
Howard Shore

Outstanding Achievement in Special Effects
King Kong

Billy Wilder Award for Excellence in Direction
David Cronenberg

William K. Everson Award for Film History
George Feltenstein

Producer of the Year Award
Saul Zaentz

BEST TEN FILMS OF 2005
Brokeback Mountain
Capote
Crash
Good Night, And Good Luck
History of Violence
Match Point
Memoirs of a Geisha
Munich
Syriana
Walk the Line

BEST FIVE FOREIGN-LANGUAGE FILMS OF 2005
2046
Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress
Downfall
Paradise Now
Walk on Water

BEST FIVE DOCUMENTARIES OF 2005
Ballets Russes
Grizzly Man
Mad Hot Ballroom
March of the Penguins
Murderball

Special Recognition of Films That Reflect Freedom of Expression
Innocent Voices and The Untold Story of Emmett Louis Till

Special Mention for Excellence in Filmmaking
The National Board of Review, in keeping with its long tradition of recognizing excellence in filmmaking, is proud to salute the following films crafted by visionary artists, which demonstrate the creativity and determination always vital to the film industry.
Breakfast on Pluto
Cape of Good Hope
The Dying Gaul
Everything Is Illuminated
Hustle & Flow
Junebug
Layer Cake
Lord of War
Nine Lives
The Thing About My Folks
The Upside of Anger

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“Film festivals, for those who don’t know, are not exactly the glitzy red carpet affairs you see on TV. Those do happen, but they’re a tiny part of the festival. The main part of any film festival are the thousands of people with festival passes hanging on lanyards beneath their anoraks, carrying brochures for movies you have never and will never hear of, desperately scrabbling to sell whatever movie it is to buyers from all over the world. Every hotel bar, every cafe, every restaurant is filled to the brim with these people, talking loudly about non-existent deals. The Brits are the worst because most of the British film industry, with a few honourable exceptions, are scam artists and chancers who move around from company to company failing to get anything good made and trying to cast Danny Dyer in anything that moves. I’m seeing guys here who I first met twenty years ago and who are still wearing the same clothes, doing the same job (albeit for a different company) and spinning the same line of bullshit about how THIS movie has Al Pacino or Meryl Streep or George Clooney attached and, whilst that last one didn’t work out, THIS ONE is going to be HUGE. As the day goes on, they start drinking and it all gets ugly and, well, that’s why I’m the guy walking through the Tiergarten with a camera taking pictures of frozen lakes and pretending this isn’t happening.

“Berlin is cool, though and I’ve been lucky to be doing meetings with some people who want to actually get things done. We’ll see what comes of it.”
~ Julian Simpson 

“The difference between poetry and prose, and why if you’re not acculturated to poetry, you might resist it: that page is frightening. Why is it not filled? The two categories of people who don’t feel that way are children and prisoners. So many prison poets; they see that gap and experience it differently. I’m for the gap!”
~ Poet Eileen Myles