National Board of Review

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Awards: December 12, 2005

Best Film
Good Night, And Good Luck

Best Foreign Language Film
Paradise Now

Best Documentary
March of the Penguins

Best Animated Feature
Tim Burton’s Corpse Bride

Best Director
Ang Lee, Brokeback Mountain

Best Actor
Philip Seymour Hoffman, Capote

Best Actress
Felicity Huffman, TransAmerica

Best Supporting Actor
Jake Gyllenhaal, Brokeback Mountain

Best Supporting Actress
Gong Li, Memoirs of a Geisha

Best Acting By An Ensemble
Mrs. Henderson Presents

Breakthrough Performance Actor
Terrence Howard, Crash, Get Rich or Die Tryin’ and Hustle & Flow

Breakthrough Performance Actress
Q’Orianka Kilcher, The New World

Best Directorial Debut
Julian Fellowes, Separate Lies

Best Adapted Screenplay
Stephen Gaghan, Syriana

Best Original Screenplay
Noah Baumbach, The Squid and the Whale

Best Film or Mini-Series Made for Cable TV
Lackawanna Blues

Career Achievement
Jane Fonda

Career Achievement in Film Music Composition
Howard Shore

Outstanding Achievement in Special Effects
King Kong

Billy Wilder Award for Excellence in Direction
David Cronenberg

William K. Everson Award for Film History
George Feltenstein

Producer of the Year Award
Saul Zaentz

BEST TEN FILMS OF 2005
Brokeback Mountain
Capote
Crash
Good Night, And Good Luck
History of Violence
Match Point
Memoirs of a Geisha
Munich
Syriana
Walk the Line

BEST FIVE FOREIGN-LANGUAGE FILMS OF 2005
2046
Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress
Downfall
Paradise Now
Walk on Water

BEST FIVE DOCUMENTARIES OF 2005
Ballets Russes
Grizzly Man
Mad Hot Ballroom
March of the Penguins
Murderball

Special Recognition of Films That Reflect Freedom of Expression
Innocent Voices and The Untold Story of Emmett Louis Till

Special Mention for Excellence in Filmmaking
The National Board of Review, in keeping with its long tradition of recognizing excellence in filmmaking, is proud to salute the following films crafted by visionary artists, which demonstrate the creativity and determination always vital to the film industry.
Breakfast on Pluto
Cape of Good Hope
The Dying Gaul
Everything Is Illuminated
Hustle & Flow
Junebug
Layer Cake
Lord of War
Nine Lives
The Thing About My Folks
The Upside of Anger

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“Any time a movie causes a country to threaten nuclear retaliation, the higher-ups wanna get in a room with you… In terms of getting the word out about the movie, it’s not bad. If they actually make good on it, it would be bad for the world—but luckily that doesn’t seem like their style… We’ll make a movie that maybe for two seconds will make some 18-year-old think about North Korea in a way he never would have otherwise. Or who knows? We were told one of the reasons they’re so against the movie is that they’re afraid it’ll actually get into North Korea. They do have bootlegs and stuff. Maybe the tapes will make their way to North Korea and cause a fucking revolution. At best, it will cause a country to be free, and at worst, it will cause a nuclear war. Big margin with this movie.”
~ Seth Rogen In Rolling Stone 1224

“Yes, good movies sprout up, inevitably, in the cracks and seams between the tectonic plates on which all of these franchises stay balanced, and we are reassured of their hardiness. But we don’t see what we don’t see; we don’t see the effort, or the cost of the effort, or the movies of which we’re deprived because of the cost of the effort. Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice may have come from a studio, but it still required a substantial chunk of outside financing, and at $35 million, it’s not even that expensive. No studio could find the $8.5 million it cost Dan Gilroy to make Nightcrawler. Birdman cost a mere $18 million and still had to scrape that together at the last minute. Imagine American movie culture for the last few years without Her or Foxcatcher or American Hustle or The Master or Zero Dark Thirty and it suddenly looks markedly more frail—and those movies exist only because of the fairy godmothership of independent producer Megan Ellison. The grace of billionaires is not a great business model on which to hang the hopes of an art form.”
~ Mark Harris On The State Of The Movies