National Board of Review

2003 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2011 | 2013 | 2014

Awards: December 12, 2005

Best Film
Good Night, And Good Luck

Best Foreign Language Film
Paradise Now

Best Documentary
March of the Penguins

Best Animated Feature
Tim Burton’s Corpse Bride

Best Director
Ang Lee, Brokeback Mountain

Best Actor
Philip Seymour Hoffman, Capote

Best Actress
Felicity Huffman, TransAmerica

Best Supporting Actor
Jake Gyllenhaal, Brokeback Mountain

Best Supporting Actress
Gong Li, Memoirs of a Geisha

Best Acting By An Ensemble
Mrs. Henderson Presents

Breakthrough Performance Actor
Terrence Howard, Crash, Get Rich or Die Tryin’ and Hustle & Flow

Breakthrough Performance Actress
Q’Orianka Kilcher, The New World

Best Directorial Debut
Julian Fellowes, Separate Lies

Best Adapted Screenplay
Stephen Gaghan, Syriana

Best Original Screenplay
Noah Baumbach, The Squid and the Whale

Best Film or Mini-Series Made for Cable TV
Lackawanna Blues

Career Achievement
Jane Fonda

Career Achievement in Film Music Composition
Howard Shore

Outstanding Achievement in Special Effects
King Kong

Billy Wilder Award for Excellence in Direction
David Cronenberg

William K. Everson Award for Film History
George Feltenstein

Producer of the Year Award
Saul Zaentz

BEST TEN FILMS OF 2005
Brokeback Mountain
Capote
Crash
Good Night, And Good Luck
History of Violence
Match Point
Memoirs of a Geisha
Munich
Syriana
Walk the Line

BEST FIVE FOREIGN-LANGUAGE FILMS OF 2005
2046
Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress
Downfall
Paradise Now
Walk on Water

BEST FIVE DOCUMENTARIES OF 2005
Ballets Russes
Grizzly Man
Mad Hot Ballroom
March of the Penguins
Murderball

Special Recognition of Films That Reflect Freedom of Expression
Innocent Voices and The Untold Story of Emmett Louis Till

Special Mention for Excellence in Filmmaking
The National Board of Review, in keeping with its long tradition of recognizing excellence in filmmaking, is proud to salute the following films crafted by visionary artists, which demonstrate the creativity and determination always vital to the film industry.
Breakfast on Pluto
Cape of Good Hope
The Dying Gaul
Everything Is Illuminated
Hustle & Flow
Junebug
Layer Cake
Lord of War
Nine Lives
The Thing About My Folks
The Upside of Anger

Comments are closed.

Quote Unquotesee all »

Dear Irene Cho, I will miss your energy and passion; your optimism and joy; your kindness towards friends, colleagues, strangers, struggling filmmakers, or anyone who randomly crossed your path and needed a hand. My brothers and I have long considered you another sibling in our family. Our holiday photos – both western and eastern – have you among all the cousins, in-laws, and kids… in the snow, sun, opening presents, at large dinner gatherings, playing Monopoly, breaking out pomegranate seeds and teaching us all how to dance Gangnam style. Your friendship and loyalty meant a great deal to me: you were the loudest cheerleader when I experienced victories and you were always ready with sushi when I had disappointments. You had endless crazy ideas which always seemed impossible but you would will them into existence. (Like that time you called me and suggested that we host a brunch for newly elected mayor of LA, Eric Garcetti because “he is going to president one day.” We didn’t have enough time or funding, of course, only your desire to do it. So you did, and I followed.) You created The Daily Buzz from nothing and it survived on your steam in spite of many setbacks because you believed in a platform for emerging filmmakers from all nations. Most of all, you were a wonderful mother to your son, Ethan, a devoted wife to your husband, and a wonderful sibling and daughter to your family. We will all miss how your wonderful smile and energy lit up the room and our lives. Rest in peace, Irene.
~ Rose Kuo Remembers Irene Cho on Facebook

“You know, I was never a critic. I never considered myself as a film critic. I started doing short films, writing screenplays and then for awhile, for a few years I wrote some film theory, including some film criticism because I had to, but I was never… I never had the desire to be a film critic. I never envisioned myself as a film critic, but I did that at a period of my life when I thought I kind of needed to understand things about cinema, understand things about film theory, understand the world map of cinema, and writing about movies gave me that, and also the opportunity to meet filmmakers I admired.

“To me, it was the best possible film school. The way it changed my perspective I suppose is that I believe in this connection between theory and practice. I think that you also make movies with ideas and you need to have ideas about filmmaking to achieve whatever you’re trying to achieve through your movies, but then I started making features in 1986 — a while ago — and I left all that behind.

“For the last three decades I’ve been making movies, I’ve been living, I’ve been observing the world. You become a different person, so basically my perspective on the world in general is very different and I hope that with every movie I make a step forward. I kind of hope I’m a better person, and hopefully a better filmmaker and hopefully try to… It’s very hard for me to go back to a different time when I would have different values in my relationship to filmmaking. I had a stiffer notion of cinema.”
~ Olivier Assayas