National Board of Review

2003 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2011

Awards: December 12, 2005

Best Film
Good Night, And Good Luck

Best Foreign Language Film
Paradise Now

Best Documentary
March of the Penguins

Best Animated Feature
Tim Burton’s Corpse Bride

Best Director
Ang Lee, Brokeback Mountain

Best Actor
Philip Seymour Hoffman, Capote

Best Actress
Felicity Huffman, TransAmerica

Best Supporting Actor
Jake Gyllenhaal, Brokeback Mountain

Best Supporting Actress
Gong Li, Memoirs of a Geisha

Best Acting By An Ensemble
Mrs. Henderson Presents

Breakthrough Performance Actor
Terrence Howard, Crash, Get Rich or Die Tryin’ and Hustle & Flow

Breakthrough Performance Actress
Q’Orianka Kilcher, The New World

Best Directorial Debut
Julian Fellowes, Separate Lies

Best Adapted Screenplay
Stephen Gaghan, Syriana

Best Original Screenplay
Noah Baumbach, The Squid and the Whale

Best Film or Mini-Series Made for Cable TV
Lackawanna Blues

Career Achievement
Jane Fonda

Career Achievement in Film Music Composition
Howard Shore

Outstanding Achievement in Special Effects
King Kong

Billy Wilder Award for Excellence in Direction
David Cronenberg

William K. Everson Award for Film History
George Feltenstein

Producer of the Year Award
Saul Zaentz

BEST TEN FILMS OF 2005
Brokeback Mountain
Capote
Crash
Good Night, And Good Luck
History of Violence
Match Point
Memoirs of a Geisha
Munich
Syriana
Walk the Line

BEST FIVE FOREIGN-LANGUAGE FILMS OF 2005
2046
Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress
Downfall
Paradise Now
Walk on Water

BEST FIVE DOCUMENTARIES OF 2005
Ballets Russes
Grizzly Man
Mad Hot Ballroom
March of the Penguins
Murderball

Special Recognition of Films That Reflect Freedom of Expression
Innocent Voices and The Untold Story of Emmett Louis Till

Special Mention for Excellence in Filmmaking
The National Board of Review, in keeping with its long tradition of recognizing excellence in filmmaking, is proud to salute the following films crafted by visionary artists, which demonstrate the creativity and determination always vital to the film industry.
Breakfast on Pluto
Cape of Good Hope
The Dying Gaul
Everything Is Illuminated
Hustle & Flow
Junebug
Layer Cake
Lord of War
Nine Lives
The Thing About My Folks
The Upside of Anger

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DEADLINE: How does a visualist feel about people watching your films on a phone or VOD?
REFN: It depends on what kind of movie you make. We had great success with Only God Forgives on multiple platforms in the U.S. Young people will decide how they see it, when they want to see it. Don’t try to fight it. Embrace it. That’s a wonderful opportunity. We’re at the most exciting time since the invention of the wheel, in terms of creativity because distribution and accessibility have changed everything. A camera is still a camera whether it’s digital or not; there’s still sound; an actor is an actor. Ninety-nine percent of what you do is going to be seen on a smart phone – I know this is the greatest thing ever made because it allows people to choose, watching what you do on this format or go into a theater and see it on a screen. That means more people than ever will see what I do, which is personally satisfying in terms of vanity. But you have to be able to adapt, to accept things in different order and length than we’re used to. We are in a very, very exciting time.
~ Nic Refn to Jen Yamato

DEADLINE: You mention Tarantino, who with Christopher Nolan and a few other giants, saved film stock from extinction. To him, showing a digital film in a theater is the equivalent of watching TV in public. Make an argument for why digital is a good film making canvas.
REFN: Costwise, it’s a very effective way for young people to start making movies. You can make your movie on an iPhone. It’s wonderful seeing how my own children use technology to enhance creativity. For me it’s a wonderful canvas. Sure, I love grain in film. I love celluloid. But I also like creativity. I like crayons, I like pencils, I like paint. It’s all relative. Technology is more inclusive. A hundred years ago when film was invented, it was an elitist club. Very few people got to make it, very few people controlled it and very few people owned it. A hundred years later, storytelling through images is everyone’s domain. It’s ultimate capitalism. There are no rules, and no barriers and no Hays Code. Where does this go in another hundred years? I don’t know but I would love to see it.
~ Nic Refn To Jen Yamato