Los Angeles Film Critics Association

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LOS ANGELES. Brokeback Mountain was voted Best Picture of the Year. It was announced tonight by Henry Sheehan, President of the Los Angeles Film Critics Association (LAFCA). The runner up was A History of Violence.

LAFCA’s 31st annual achievement awards ceremony will be held Thursday, January 17 at the Park Hyatt Hotel in Los Angeles.

Best Picture
Brokeback Mountain
Runner-up: A History of Violence

Best Director
Ang Lee, Brokeback Mountain
Runner-up: David Cronenberg, A History of Violence

Best Actor
Phillip Seymour Hoffman, Capote
Runner-up: Heath Ledger, Brokeback Mountain

Best Actress
Vera Farmiga, Down to the Bone
Runner-up: Dame Judi Dench, Mrs. Henderson Presents

Best Supporting Actor
William Hurt, A History of Violence
Runner-up: Frank Langella, Good Night, and Good Luck

Best Supporting Actress
Catherine Keener, The 40-Year-Old Virgin, Capote, The Ballad of Jack and Rose, & The Interpreter
Runner-up: Amy Adams, Junebug

Best Screenplay
TIE between
Dan Futterman, Capote
and
Noah Baumbach, The Squid & The Whale

Best Cinematography
Robert Elswit, Good Night, and Good Luck.
Runner-up: Chris Doyle, Kwan Pun Leung, Yiu-Fai Lai, 2046

Best Production Design
William Chang, 2046
Runner-up: James D. Bissell, Good Night, And Good Luck.

Best Music Score
Howl’s Moving Castle, Joe Hisaishi
Runner-up: Tony Takatani, Ryuichi Sakamoto

Best Foreign-Language Film
Cache, directed by Michael Haneke
Runner-up: 2046, directed by Wong Kar Wai

Best Documentary/Non-Fiction Film
Grizzly Man, directed by Werner Herzog
Runner-up: Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room directed by Alex Gibney

Best Animation
Nick Park and Steve Box, Wallace & Gromit in The Curse of the Were-Rabbit

The Douglas Edwards Experimental/Independent Film/Video Award
La Commune (Paris, 1871) directed by Peter Watkins

New Generation Award
Terrence Howard

Career Achievement Award
Richard Widmark

Special Citation
To Kevin Thomas for his contribution to film culture in Los Angeles.
To David Shepard, Bruce Posner and the Anthology Film Archive to honor Unseen Cinema,an unprecedented 8-disc collection of films from 1894-1941.

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