Chicago Film Critics

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Nominations: December 30, 2005
Awards: January 9, 2006

Best Picture
Crash

Best Foreign Language Film
Cache

Best Director
David Cronenberg: A History of Violence

Best Screenplay
Crash by Paul Haggis & Bobby Moresco

Best Actor
Philip Seymour Hoffman – Capote

Best Actress
Joan Allen – The Upside of Anger

Best Supporting Actor
Mickey Rourke – Sin City

Best Supporting Actress
Maria Bello – A History of Violence

Best Cinematography
Rodrigo Prieto – Brokeback Mountain

Best Original Score
Brokeback Mountain – Gustavo Santaolalla

Best Documentary
Grizzly Man

Most Promising Performer
Miranda July – Me and You and Everyone We Know

Most Promising Director
Bennett Miller – Capote

Nominations

Best Picture
Brokeback Mountain
Crash
Good Night, and Good Luck
A History of Violence
King Kong

Best Foreign Language Film
2046
Cache
Downfall
Kung – Fu Hustle
Oldboy

Best Director
George Clooney: Good Night, and Good Luck
David Cronenberg: A History of Violence
Peter Jackson: King Kong
Ang Lee: Brokeback Mountain
Steven Spielberg: Munich

Best Screenplay
Brokeback Mountain by Larry McMurtry & Diana Ossana
Capote by Dan Futterman
Crash by Paul Haggis & Bobby Moresco
Good Night, and Good Luck by George Clooney & Grant Heslov
A History of Violence by Josh Olson

Best Actor
Philip Seymour Hoffman – Capote
Terrence Howard – Hustle & Flow
Heath Ledger – Brokeback Mountain
Joaquin Phoenix – Walk the Line
David Strathairn – Good Night, and Good Luck

Best Actress
Joan Allen – The Upside of Anger
Felicity Huffman – Transamerica
Keira Knightley – Pride & Prejudice
Naomi Watts – King Kong
Reese Witherspoon – Walk the Line

Best Supporting Actor
Matt Dillon – Crash
Terrence Howard – Crash
Paul Giamatti – Cinderella Man
Jake Gyllenhaal – Brokeback Mountain
Mickey Rourke – Sin City
Donald Sutherland – Pride & Prejudice

Best Supporting Actress
Amy Adams – Junebug
Maria Bello – A History of Violence
Scarlett Johansson – Match Point
Catherine Keener – Capote
Rachel Weisz – The Constant Gardener
Michelle Williams – Brokeback Mountain

Best Original Score
Batman Begins – Hans Zimmer and James Newton Howard
Brokeback Mountain – Gustavo Santaolalla
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Danny Elfman
King Kong – James Newton Howard
Memoirs of a Geisha – John Williams

Best Cinematography
Brokeback Mountain – Rodrigo Prieto
Good Night, and Good Luck – Robert Elswit
King Kong – Andrew Lesnie
Munich – Janusz Kaminski
The New World – Emmanuel Lubezki
Pride & Prejudice – Roman Osin

Best Documentary
Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room
Grizzly Man
Mad Hot Ballroom
March of the Penguins
Murderball

Most Promising Performer
Chris “Ludacris” Bridges – Crash and Hustle & Flow
Georgie Henley – The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
Miranda July – Me and You and Everyone We Know
Q’Orianka Kilcher – The New World
Owen Kline – The Squid and the Whale

Most Promising Director
Craig Brewer – Hustle & Flow
Miranda July – Me and You and Everyone We Know
Bennett Miller – Capote
Phil Morrison – Junebug
Joe Wright – Pride & Prejudice

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“Let me try and be as direct as I possibly can with you on this. There was no relationship to repair. I didn’t intend for Harvey to buy and release The Immigrant – I thought it was a terrible idea. And I didn’t think he would want the film, and I didn’t think he would like the film. He bought the film without me knowing! He bought it from the equity people who raised the money for me in the States. And I told them it was a terrible idea, but I had no say over the matter. So they sold it to him without my say-so, and with me thinking it was a terrible idea. I was completely correct, but I couldn’t do anything about it. It was not my preference, it was not my choice, I did not want that to happen, I have no relationship with Harvey. So, it’s not like I repaired some relationship, then he screwed me again, and I’m an idiot for trusting him twice! Like I say, you try to distance yourself as much as possible from the immediate response to a movie. With The Immigrant I had final cut. So he knew he couldn’t make me change it. But he applied all the pressure he could, including shelving the film.”
James Gray

“I’m an unusual producer because I control the destiny of a lot of the films I’ve done. Most of them are in perfect states of restoration and preservation and distribution, and I aim to keep them in distribution. HanWay Films, which is my sales company, has a 500-film catalogue, which is looked after and tended like a garden. I’m still looking after my films in the catalogue and trying to get other people to look after their films, which we represent intellectually, to try to keep them alive. A film has to be run through a projector to be alive, unfortunately, and those electric shadows are few and far between now. It’s very hard to go and see films in a movie house. I was always involved with the sales and marketing of my films, right up from The Shout onwards. I’ve had good periods, but I also had a best period because the film business was in its best period then. You couldn’t make The Last Emperor today. You couldn’t make The Sheltering Sky today. You couldn’t make those films anymore as independent films. There are neither the resources nor the vision within the studios to go to them and say, “I want to make a film about China with no stars in it.”Then, twenty years ago, I thought, “OK, I’m going to sell my own films but I don’t want to make it my own sales company.” I wanted it to be for me but I wanted to make it open for every other producer, so they don’t feel that they make a film but I get the focus. So, it’s a company that is my business and I’m involved with running it in a certain way, but I’m not seen as a competitor with other people that use it. It’s used by lots of different producers apart from me. When I want to use it, however, it’s there for me and I suppose I’m planning to continue making all my films to be sold by HanWay. I don’t have to, but I do because it’s in my building and the marketing’s here, and I can do it like that. Often, it sounds like I’m being easy about things, but it’s much more difficult than it sounds. It’s just that I’ve been at it for a long time and there’s lots of fat and security around my business. I know how to make films, but it’s not easy—it’s become a very exacting life.”
~ Producer Jeremy Thomas