Chicago Film Critics

2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014

Nominations: December 30, 2005
Awards: January 9, 2006

Best Picture
Crash

Best Foreign Language Film
Cache

Best Director
David Cronenberg: A History of Violence

Best Screenplay
Crash by Paul Haggis & Bobby Moresco

Best Actor
Philip Seymour Hoffman – Capote

Best Actress
Joan Allen – The Upside of Anger

Best Supporting Actor
Mickey Rourke – Sin City

Best Supporting Actress
Maria Bello – A History of Violence

Best Cinematography
Rodrigo Prieto – Brokeback Mountain

Best Original Score
Brokeback Mountain – Gustavo Santaolalla

Best Documentary
Grizzly Man

Most Promising Performer
Miranda July – Me and You and Everyone We Know

Most Promising Director
Bennett Miller – Capote

Nominations

Best Picture
Brokeback Mountain
Crash
Good Night, and Good Luck
A History of Violence
King Kong

Best Foreign Language Film
2046
Cache
Downfall
Kung – Fu Hustle
Oldboy

Best Director
George Clooney: Good Night, and Good Luck
David Cronenberg: A History of Violence
Peter Jackson: King Kong
Ang Lee: Brokeback Mountain
Steven Spielberg: Munich

Best Screenplay
Brokeback Mountain by Larry McMurtry & Diana Ossana
Capote by Dan Futterman
Crash by Paul Haggis & Bobby Moresco
Good Night, and Good Luck by George Clooney & Grant Heslov
A History of Violence by Josh Olson

Best Actor
Philip Seymour Hoffman – Capote
Terrence Howard – Hustle & Flow
Heath Ledger – Brokeback Mountain
Joaquin Phoenix – Walk the Line
David Strathairn – Good Night, and Good Luck

Best Actress
Joan Allen – The Upside of Anger
Felicity Huffman – Transamerica
Keira Knightley – Pride & Prejudice
Naomi Watts – King Kong
Reese Witherspoon – Walk the Line

Best Supporting Actor
Matt Dillon – Crash
Terrence Howard – Crash
Paul Giamatti – Cinderella Man
Jake Gyllenhaal – Brokeback Mountain
Mickey Rourke – Sin City
Donald Sutherland – Pride & Prejudice

Best Supporting Actress
Amy Adams – Junebug
Maria Bello – A History of Violence
Scarlett Johansson – Match Point
Catherine Keener – Capote
Rachel Weisz – The Constant Gardener
Michelle Williams – Brokeback Mountain

Best Original Score
Batman Begins – Hans Zimmer and James Newton Howard
Brokeback Mountain – Gustavo Santaolalla
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Danny Elfman
King Kong – James Newton Howard
Memoirs of a Geisha – John Williams

Best Cinematography
Brokeback Mountain – Rodrigo Prieto
Good Night, and Good Luck – Robert Elswit
King Kong – Andrew Lesnie
Munich – Janusz Kaminski
The New World – Emmanuel Lubezki
Pride & Prejudice – Roman Osin

Best Documentary
Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room
Grizzly Man
Mad Hot Ballroom
March of the Penguins
Murderball

Most Promising Performer
Chris “Ludacris” Bridges – Crash and Hustle & Flow
Georgie Henley – The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
Miranda July – Me and You and Everyone We Know
Q’Orianka Kilcher – The New World
Owen Kline – The Squid and the Whale

Most Promising Director
Craig Brewer – Hustle & Flow
Miranda July – Me and You and Everyone We Know
Bennett Miller – Capote
Phil Morrison – Junebug
Joe Wright – Pride & Prejudice

Comments are closed.

Quote Unquotesee all »

Tsangari: With my next film, White Knuckles, it comes with a budget — it’s going to be a huge new world for me. As always when I enter into a new thing, don’t you wonder how it’s going to be and how much of yourself you are going to have to sacrifice? The ballet of all of this. I’m already imaging the choreography — not of the camera, but the choreography of actually bringing it to life. It is as fascinating as the shooting itself. I find the producing as exciting as the directing. The one informs the other. There is this producer-director hat that I constantly wear. I’ve been thinking about these early auteurs, like Howard Hawks and John Ford and Preston Sturges—all of these guys basically were hired by the studio, and I doubt they had final cut, and somehow they had films that now we can say they had their signatures.  There are different ways of being creative within the parameters and limitations of production. The only thing you cannot negotiate is stupidity.
Filmmaker: And unfortunately, there is an abundance of that in the world.
Tsangari: This is the only big risk: stupidity. Everything else is completely worked out in the end.
~ Chevalier‘s Rachel Athina Tsangari

“The middle-range movies that I was doing have largely either stopped being made, or they’ve moved to television, now that television is a go-to medium for directors who can’t get work in theatricals, because there are so few theatricals being made. But also with the new miniseries concept, you can tell a long story in detail without having to cram it all into 90 minutes. You don’t have to cut the characters and take out the secondary people. You can actually put them all on a big canvas. And it is a big canvas, because people have bigger screens now, so there’s no aesthetic difference between the way you shoot a movie and the way you shoot a TV show.

“Which is all for the good. But what’s happened in the interim is that theatrical movies being a spectacle business are now either giant blockbuster movies that run three hours—even superhero movies run three hours, they used to run like 58 minutes!—and the others, which are dysfunctional family independent movies or the slob comedy or the kiddie movie, and those are all low-budget. So the middle ground of movies that were about things, they’re just gone. Or else they’re on HBO. Like the Bryan Cranston LBJ movie, which years ago would’ve been made for theaters.

“You’ve got people like Paul Schrader and Walter Hill who can’t get their movies theatrically distributed because there’s no market for it. So they end up going to VOD, and VOD is a model from which no one makes any money, because most of the time, as soon as they get on the site, they’re pirated. So the whole model of the system right now is completely broken. And whether or not anybody’s going to try to fix, or if it even can be fixed, I don’t know. But it’s certainly not the same business that I got into in the ’70s.”
~ Joe Dante

Z Weekend Report