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Chicago Film Critics

2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014

Nominations: December 30, 2005
Awards: January 9, 2006

Best Picture
Crash

Best Foreign Language Film
Cache

Best Director
David Cronenberg: A History of Violence

Best Screenplay
Crash by Paul Haggis & Bobby Moresco

Best Actor
Philip Seymour Hoffman – Capote

Best Actress
Joan Allen – The Upside of Anger

Best Supporting Actor
Mickey Rourke – Sin City

Best Supporting Actress
Maria Bello – A History of Violence

Best Cinematography
Rodrigo Prieto – Brokeback Mountain

Best Original Score
Brokeback Mountain – Gustavo Santaolalla

Best Documentary
Grizzly Man

Most Promising Performer
Miranda July – Me and You and Everyone We Know

Most Promising Director
Bennett Miller – Capote

Nominations

Best Picture
Brokeback Mountain
Crash
Good Night, and Good Luck
A History of Violence
King Kong

Best Foreign Language Film
2046
Cache
Downfall
Kung – Fu Hustle
Oldboy

Best Director
George Clooney: Good Night, and Good Luck
David Cronenberg: A History of Violence
Peter Jackson: King Kong
Ang Lee: Brokeback Mountain
Steven Spielberg: Munich

Best Screenplay
Brokeback Mountain by Larry McMurtry & Diana Ossana
Capote by Dan Futterman
Crash by Paul Haggis & Bobby Moresco
Good Night, and Good Luck by George Clooney & Grant Heslov
A History of Violence by Josh Olson

Best Actor
Philip Seymour Hoffman – Capote
Terrence Howard – Hustle & Flow
Heath Ledger – Brokeback Mountain
Joaquin Phoenix – Walk the Line
David Strathairn – Good Night, and Good Luck

Best Actress
Joan Allen – The Upside of Anger
Felicity Huffman – Transamerica
Keira Knightley – Pride & Prejudice
Naomi Watts – King Kong
Reese Witherspoon – Walk the Line

Best Supporting Actor
Matt Dillon – Crash
Terrence Howard – Crash
Paul Giamatti – Cinderella Man
Jake Gyllenhaal – Brokeback Mountain
Mickey Rourke – Sin City
Donald Sutherland – Pride & Prejudice

Best Supporting Actress
Amy Adams – Junebug
Maria Bello – A History of Violence
Scarlett Johansson – Match Point
Catherine Keener – Capote
Rachel Weisz – The Constant Gardener
Michelle Williams – Brokeback Mountain

Best Original Score
Batman Begins – Hans Zimmer and James Newton Howard
Brokeback Mountain – Gustavo Santaolalla
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Danny Elfman
King Kong – James Newton Howard
Memoirs of a Geisha – John Williams

Best Cinematography
Brokeback Mountain – Rodrigo Prieto
Good Night, and Good Luck – Robert Elswit
King Kong – Andrew Lesnie
Munich – Janusz Kaminski
The New World – Emmanuel Lubezki
Pride & Prejudice – Roman Osin

Best Documentary
Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room
Grizzly Man
Mad Hot Ballroom
March of the Penguins
Murderball

Most Promising Performer
Chris “Ludacris” Bridges – Crash and Hustle & Flow
Georgie Henley – The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
Miranda July – Me and You and Everyone We Know
Q’Orianka Kilcher – The New World
Owen Kline – The Squid and the Whale

Most Promising Director
Craig Brewer – Hustle & Flow
Miranda July – Me and You and Everyone We Know
Bennett Miller – Capote
Phil Morrison – Junebug
Joe Wright – Pride & Prejudice

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