By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Academy Invites 112 to Membership

Beverly Hills, CA — The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has extended membership invitations to 112 artists and executives who have distinguished themselves in the field of theatrical motion pictures. The group will be the only new voting members invited to join the organization in 2005.

“Our decision to slow the growth of the Academy, and to become even more selective in our membership process, is working,” said Academy President Frank Pierson. “The branch membership committees understand what the Academy is trying to do and have begun searching for the top exemplars in their respective areas, presenting to the board only their most impressive candidates.”

The membership procedures instituted last year allow the organization to grow — after filling vacancies resulting from deaths and members opting for retired (non-voting) status — by a maximum of thirty new members annually. Pierson said that even if all the 2005 invitees accept their invitations, the Academy’s number of voting members will actually shrink slightly compared to the roster of voting members at the same time period in 2004. “We’re in the early stages of a slow but deliberate refining process, ” he said.

Candidates for Academy membership are normally proposed by members and then considered by committees made up of prominent representatives of each of the organization’s fourteen branches — art directors, executives, film editors, etc. In addition, individuals nominated for Academy Awards, if not already members of the organization, are automatically considered by the appropriate committees, though not necessarily invited to membership.

Though the great majority of AMPAS members are based in the U.S., membership is open to qualified filmmakers around the world. The Academy roster currently includes theatrical motion picture makers from 36 countries.

New members will be welcomed into the organization at an invitation-only reception on Wednesday, September 21, at the Academy’s Fairbanks Center for Motion Picture Study in Beverly Hills.

The 2005 invitees, listed by membership subcategories where appropriate rather than by branch, are:

Actors At-Large

Gael Garcia Bernal

Ian Bryce

Thomas Haden Church

Fred Chandler

Jennifer Coolidge

Charles Newirth

Will Ferrell

Jamie Foxx

Paul Giamatti

Cinematographers

Catalina Sandino Moreno

Curtis Clark

Sophie Okonedo

Jim Denault

Clive Owen

Robert Fraisse

Charlotte Rampling

Dick Pope

Jean Reno

Tami Reiker

Stellan Skarsgard

Lisa Rinzler

Imelda Staunton

Jerry Zielinski

Mykelti Williamson

Ziyi Zhang

Animator Directors

Andrew Adamson

Alejandro Amenábar

Kathy Altieri

Marc Forster

Signe Baumane

Oliver Hirschbiegel

Baker Bloodworth

Andy Tennant

John Hughes

Joel Zwick

Scott F. Johnston

Chris Landreth

Tim Miller

Documentary Music

Nick Broomfield

Bruno Coulais

Peter Davis

Jan A.P. Kaczmarek

Kirby Dick

Mark Mothersbaugh

Kathleen Glynn

Edward Shearmur

Robert Greenwald

Stacy Peralta

Producers

Avi Arad

Executives

Elizabeth Avellán

Paul G. Allen

Ross Katz

Doug Belgrad

Michael London

Robert Berney

Scott Mosier

Ann Daly

Denise Robert

Daniel Ferleger

Camela Galano

Production Designers

Brad Grey

John Dexter

Steven Jobs

Jim Dultz

Michael Lynton

Andrew McRae Hennah

Kevin McCormick

Gemma Jackson

Bruce Tobey

Anthony Pratt

Matt Tolmach

Public Relations

Film Editors

Breena Camden

Jim Miller

Laura Carrillo

Julie Monroe

Susan J. Kroll

Debra Neil-Fisher

Michael Moses

Nancy Richardson

Dennis Rice

Kevin Tent

Steven Mark Siskind

Live Action Short Films – Scientific and Technical

Andrea Arnold

Glenn Kennel

Andrew J. Sacks

Nacho Vigalondo

Set Decorators – Makeup/Hairstylists

John Bush

John Blake

Jim Erickson

J. Roy Helland

Debra Schutt

Sound

Writers

David Arnold

Paul Haggis

Steve Cantamessa

David Magee

Andrew Koyama

Keir Pearson

Hugh Waddell

Jose Rivera

Michael Wilhoit

David N. Weiss

David Mark Young

Mike White

Visual Effects

Joseph B. Bauer

Nicholas Brooks

Blair Clark

Mark Forker

Robert Grasmere

Matthew R. Gratzner

Roger John Guyett

Christophe Hery

David S. Williams, Jr.

Comments are closed.

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Because of my relative candor on Twitter regarding why I quit my day job, my DMs have overflowed with similar stories from colleagues around the globe. These peeks behind the curtains of film festivals, venues, distributors and funding bodies weren’t pretty. Certain dismal patterns recurred (and resonated): Boards who don’t engage with or even understand their organization’s artistic mission and are insensitive to the diverse neighborhood in which their organization’s venue is located; incompetent founders and/or presidents who create only obstacles, never solutions; unduly empowered, Trumpian bean counters who chip away at the taste and experiences that make organizations’ cultural offerings special; expensive PR teams that don’t bring to the table a bare-minimum familiarity with the rich subcultural art form they’re half-heartedly peddling as “product”; nonprofit arts organizations for whom art now ranks as a distant-second goal behind profit.”
~ Eric Allen Hatch

To me, Hunter S. Thompson was a hero. His early books were great, but in many ways, his life and career post–Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail is a cautionary tale for authors. People expected him to be high and drunk all the time and play that persona, and he stuck with that to the end, and I don’t think it was good for him. I always sort of feel mixed emotions when I hear that people went and hung out with Hunter and how great it was to get high with Hunter. The fact is the guy was having difficulty doing any sustained writing at all for years probably because so many quote, unquote, “friends” wanted to get high with him … There was a badly disappointed romantic there. I mean, that great line, “This is where the wave broke, the tide rolled back … ” This was a guy that was hurt and disappointed and very bitter about things, and it made his writing beautiful, and also with that came a lot of pain.
~ Anthony Bourdain