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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Left Out Of This Page Six Quote…

I’m quoted aging up the Academy membership, but the punch line, which I think is significant, is that I don’t think that Rock will ever host again after this.

I do think that most Academy members are hip to the room, but they can be prickly and a guy who doesn’t show real restraint is a danger, much as Whoopi Goldberg was.

He’s not going to get dumped… they’ll be thrilled if this “controversy” draws more eyeballs. But never again.

64 Responses to “Left Out Of This Page Six Quote…”

  1. Have you bought your “As Seen On PageSix” T-Shirt yet?

  2. bicycle bob says:

    they wanted younger and hipper and edgier. they’re getting it

  3. bicycle bob says:

    has to feel good making page 6 every week dave. ur the paris hilton of journalists now. wells is lohan. friedman is tara reid. begging for publicity.

  4. jeffrey boam's doctor says:

    excuse me… just trying to get in here.. a giant sycophant is blocking the door. Not sure I agree about Rock not hosting again. First it’s a little preemie to make such bold claims, secondly Drudge is a maroon who actually looks like a cross between Mike Judge and Tarantino (do u see it?) and thirdly if this year rates its socks off, money will talk. End of story.
    If they were really trying to quell things down a little and just get it over with, why would Gil be going ahead with all the proposed changes in the format?
    I’m thinking, it’ll be the most entertaining Oscars, no cringy opening crystal song’n’dance-mix (which be honest, have paled as years went on) and everyone will be on the edge of their seats for the Lohan bashing.

  5. Josh Massey says:

    I’m a fairly conservative guy who checks Drudge at least once a day, but I must say he’s embarassing himself with this relentless non-story.
    Of course, the best host would be Jim Carrey, who has been the highlight of any Oscar telecast he’s been on. I doubt he would do it, but at least ask!

  6. gombro says:

    How about Jerry Seinfeld? I’ll bet he has been the first person asked every year for the last 6 or seven years, don’t you think? Wonder why he doesn’t do it once. I’m sure he’d kill on that stage…..

  7. JimmyConway75 says:

    Re: Seinfeld, I’d suspect he *hasn’t* been asked, but I’d agree with you that he should host the show at some point. Gil Cates’ recent mantra has been they want a standup comedian who’s also a movie star (criteria that they’ve obviously bent a bit for Rock, since he’s had success in movies, but no one would yet refer to him as a movie star). Seinfeld, for all his abilities, has had no movie profile, save for his doc from a couple years back. That said, he’d kill on that show, imho. I also think Rock will be funny as hell. The TV audience will love him…the mountain-sized egos in the Kodak Theater…a whole other story.

  8. bicycle bob says:

    i bet seinfeld has turned it down every yr.

  9. Ty Smith says:

    If that’s Cates’ mantra, it’s kind of a dumb self-imposed limitation. Everyone agrees how good Carson was and he wasn’t a movie star.

  10. bicycle bob says:

    carson was bigger than a movie star. and its not like he didn’t get offers for huge roles. he just turned them all down. thomas crown affair, kings of comedy, etc

  11. jeffrey boam's doctor says:

    Wow – Carson turned down appearing as a black comedian in the Kings of Comedy?

  12. jeffrey boam's doctor says:

    and no offense to Carson purists and Bi-Bob. 2 things. The Oscars are a worldwide affair. A massive int’l audience. It aint just about the US.
    Carson is not bigger than any major movie star and I’ll tell you why. The tonight show doesn’t even play to 75% of the world’s population. Ask someone in Beijing if they know Tom Cruise, Julia Roberts and Carson are. Guess who they don’t know?
    This subliminal jingoistic behaviour has to be capped now and then, capiche?

  13. jon s says:

    I think bob meant “King of Comedy”, not “KingS of Comedy.” As you should know by now, bob can’t get through a single posting without making at least two or three mistakes.

  14. Joe Leydon says:

    Dr. Jeff:
    First off, I think Bi-Bob was thinking (insert joke here) of “The King of Comedy,” which Scorsese really did offer to Johnny Carson before casting Jerry Lewis. And yes, Carson did turn down that and (reportedly) several other movie roles.
    Also: I don’t think it’s jingoistic or imperialistic or anything else in the Leftie Catchphrase Book (which, truth to tell, approvingly quotes me in a footnote or two) to say that, for all their talk about international audiences and grosses, Academy members care first and foremost about appealing to the U.S. viewers (a.k.a., the only people measured by Nielsen ratings). And in his time, at his peak, Johnny Carson was certainly a bigger star than Cruise, Roberts or even John Wayne — if only in the eyes of the U.S. TV audience. Which may explain the experiment with David Letterman (who, I must admit, I enjoyed more than Crystal or Goldberg as an Oscar host). And which is why I was joking, but only half-kidding, about Teri Hatcher being a possible Oscar host.

  15. jon s says:

    But Joe, it is, I think, true that with US ratings having gone way, way down for the Oscars over the last couple of decades, the money made selling international rights becomes more important than ever to the Academy. I’m sure it costs them a fortune to put on that show. Besides that, they probably rely on the extra revenue a bit for their library and other expenses. Obviously they’d get a lower price for, say, the Australian broadcast rights if the show were to be hosted by a TV actor that nobody in Australia had ever heard of.

  16. teambanzai says:

    Come on the real story is they LOVE all this press, it just means that more people will tune in to see if he does do something bad. Heck they’ll probably get the same group of dolts that got worked up over Janet Jackson’s floppy saggy boob.

  17. Joe Leydon says:

    Don’t worry, Jon: I answered on the wrong thread.
    To repeat here: There is no American TV actor — well, OK, no American TV actor who’s a big enough star to be reasonably considered as an Oscar host — who’s unknown in Australia. At the risk of sounding like a couple of our least favorite posters — U.S. pop culture products in general, but movies and TV in particular, dominate the globe. Indeed, critic Stanley Kauffmann argued not too long ago that there is no such thing as “an American movie star.” Sure, there may be Italian movie stars who are beloved in their own country, but remain unknown everywhere else. Just as there are Korean, French, Russian and German film stars. But if you hit it big in American movies, you aren’t “an American film star” — you are an international star, because U.S. films are seen EVERYWHERE. I’m not saying there aren’t French film stars who are internationally known. But I am saying that there aren’t any Amercian film stars — and no TV stars, either — who aren’t known everywhere. (There may be a few TV personalities — say, Ted Koppell, or Conan O’Brian — who aren’t known in Australia, but “stars” and “actors” are the operative words in this discussion.) Put it another way: Teri Hatcher will be an Oscar host long before Catherine Deneuve or Ziyi Zhang ever will be.

  18. bicycle bob says:

    oh god jeff. who didn’t know i was tlaking about the scorsese movie??? got some real nitpickers here. anything else jeffs doc?
    would have been cool to see carson in the lewis role in that.

  19. gombro says:

    I may be totally dreaming this up, but I think I remember one of the female FRIENDS stars (Kudrow, Ansiton…can’t remember) on THE TONIGHT SHOW several years ago telling Leno that she liked hanging out in France because nobody recognized her there. When Leno acted surprised, she said FRIENDS never caught on in France so none of them are really known over there.

  20. NIk R says:

    WHY did JLO cancel her tour?
    Maybe it’s because she’s PREGNANT? She said her doctor reccomended she not go on the tour and if she’s so ill why didn’t it show in the grammy’s?

  21. Joe Leydon says:

    I refuse to comment, other than to say that Jennifer Lopez and I are just good friends.

  22. Mark says:

    She couldn’t even look Marc Anthony in the eyes the other night. I bet its Ben’s kid.

  23. Josh Massey says:

    And based on the last three posts, this thread is officially OVER.

  24. Joe Fitz says:

    Any celebrity couple ever hit a career wall like Lopez and Affleck? When they met they were both at the top of their professions. Now they’re featured at the Razzie’s.

  25. Mark says:

    Burt Reynolds and Lonnie A?

  26. Ty Smith says:

    That’s “Loni” A. Lonnie’s a man’s name. Your repressed homosexuality’s coming dangerously close to the surface, Mark. If you come out of the closet, you can get over your gun fetish and lose most of that anger, buddy.

  27. bicycle bob says:

    hes really obsessed with u mark. u better watch out. i think ty boy a stalker. hes in love

  28. Ty Smith says:

    There’s more projection going on here than in a Movies 18 multiplex. Is that you’re ONLY way of debating, “I know you are but what am I?”??? Most people outgrow that one at fourteen.

  29. Randall Holman says:

    Why do you always bring up others Ty Smith? Can’t you engage in frank discussion without reverting to fifth grade taunts and insults?

  30. Ty Smith says:

    Sure, Holman, as long as I’m talking with people beyond a fifth-grade mentality. It’s a little difficult to have an intellegent discussion with bob and Mark, considering their level of discourse.

  31. Terence Daily says:

    Seems to me that you are the one throwing and hurling insults at others. Your discourse leaves something to be desired here.

  32. jon s says:

    When I first came on this blog, “Terence” bob and Mark were constantly tormenting Peppers with personal emails, threats, and fake postings under his own name intended to humiliate him. Bob, as I recall, also responded to an intelligent poster, one who has never come back to the blog as far as I can tell, with a tirade about how all the women in that poster’s city were “dogs”, that in response to an intelligent comment about Michael Moore, as I recall. I say give them back what they give us, especially since their personal philosophy seems to be that people who don’t fight (as in Iraq) are homo cowards who deserve contempt. If David Poland wants this blog to be the respectable sight it should be, he needs to set up some limits so poo-throwers like bob are weeded out once and for all.

  33. thedoom says:

    I know this would require a major overhaul of typepad’s programming, but there should be some kind of moderator implemented into the comment section. As it is, the comments in a blog as popular as this one has become chaotic and unwieldy.
    I’m not saying there should be a message board, and i’m sure that Dave doesn’t have the time or patience to make one. There should just be a way for respected posters to weed through the crap that’s posted in here.

  34. bicycle bob says:

    guys like u jon can’t have a discussion without resorting to insults. if u can’t take, stay out the kitchen. defend your ideas and comments. thats all anyone asks. if ur just gonna resort to insults and defaming characters, then why bother even posting? sorry u don’t like the right wing, conservative views i got but deal with it

  35. Terence Daily says:

    Put in a registration system. It’s not hard. And I do not like my name in air quotes. Kind of dispresectful if you ask me. If you want to acknowledge me please just say Terence or TD, or Mr. Dailey. Thanks.

  36. Ty Smith says:

    Wow, still the projection from you. If I cared, I’d go back and count the number of times you’ve called me or Stella or Pepper or Ty a moron or worse. I can take the heat or I wouldn’t be here. As for those people who don’t come here anymore because you called their girlfriends “dogs”, well, I can’t speak for them, but you did call those women (was it in Rochester?) “dogs”. Nobody has gotten ruder on here than you or Mark. Nobody. And at least we answer your questions without evasion or changing the subject. That’s all I’m going to say to you, no matter how much you annoy me in the future.

  37. bicycle bob says:

    u just reference yourself in the third person? thats the problem with u libs. u just don’t have a clue. u do a mighty fine job of proving ur a moron, ty boy. u have some anger issues that should be helped by professional help. no one should hate as much as u do.

  38. Ty Smith says:

    That last post was aimed at bob, not Terence. And I’ll do as you ask, Terence. It’s just with so many people here seemingly under three or four different names, I wasn’t entirely sure you weren’t just Mark or Randall yet again under another name. But as I said, I’ll agree to “play nice” here no matter how much us liberals get baited as homos, wackos, or worse.
    As for my predictons:
    Best Picture: Million Dollar Baby
    Director: Scorsese (this may just be wishful thinking but I just can’t believe they’ll snub him again. I may have egg on my face on the 28th, but no matter how much you like M$B, its all in the acting and script. That film was no better directed than half the films made straight for HBO. I’m just hoping the acadamy will see that.)
    Actor: Jamie Foxx
    Actress: Annette Benning
    Supporting Actor: Morgan Freeman
    Supporting Actress: Cate Blanchett
    Adapted Screenplay: Million Dollar Baby
    Original Screenplay: The Aviator

  39. mex says:

    Why dont you just ignore the people you dont like (Im talking..well..writing to all of you)and really discus things. You are fun for a while, but only for a while, because then you are anoying. Take it outside the blog would you.

  40. Ty Smith says:

    Okay this is it, bob, my last comment to you. Ty is NOT, admittedly, my real name. Do you think I’d give my real name on here after the way you tormented Pepper once you found out how to contact after he used his real name on this blog? Somehow I don’t think your first name on your birth certificate is bicycle with a lower case “b.”
    You call me angry and yet when people disagree with you, you call them morons and call their girlfriends “dogs.” You really are a piece of work, but if it gets you through life to project all your hatred, anger, and idiocy back at other people, be my guest. The imperious Barbara Bush supposedly has a line she uses with people she doesn’t like: “I’m through with you,” she says at the moment she decides she will never talk to them again. Well, bob, I am totally and completely THROUGH with you.

  41. mex says:

    you posted that when I was writing but thankyou for cuting it off anyway.
    My predictons:
    because im in México i have only seen the aviator, finding neverland and ray; And I would prefer ray to win (though it wont) So I am hopefull that M$B is good and wins.
    Taylor Hackford was very good, but Martin was better, but maybe Clint is better and I have not a doubt that Mike is better (but he wont win, unless of course he gets to be this years Polansky). So from what I´ve seen I think I will go to Martin.
    Ray will win the oscar, I mean Jamie Foxx.
    Don´t want Annette to win, I want Kate to win, I would love Moreno to win (I am latino, I feel so proud), But I think its either Swank or Staunton who will.
    Mogan will win.
    Cate v.s Virginia.
    Original screenplay: Eternal Sunshine.. though not a lock.
    Adapted screenplay: Sideways…though you never know.

  42. bicycle bob says:

    ty boy if i believed that i’d be a bigger suck than liberal voters. ur never thru with anyone. u live for angry discussions and insults. which is fine. but if u hurl ’em at least be able to take ’em.
    mex, my friend. i agree on million dollar baby. i hope clint wins best actor but if i put money on it i’d go with foxx. and i hope eternal sunshine wins best original screenplay. the best race right now is director. eastwood and scorsese. two heavyweights.

  43. jeffrey boam's doctor says:

    okay since no new posts I’ll start the ball rolling… Dave would your phone number be on Paris Hilton’s phone? The recently leaked lists have a : HOT-Dave
    C’mon its you Mr Poland.. admit it 😉

  44. Joe Leydon says:

    Hmmm. Could that be why David hasn’t updated the main page for a while? He’s consulting with his lawyers?

  45. Mark says:

    I would give David a lot of credit if he is in her rolodex.

  46. jeffrey boam's doctor says:

    Well if she’s going to start blowing critics, someone should have at least been kind enough to direct her towards Ebert for starters. There is some kind of heirachy when it comes to receiving those favourable nods. (both ways)

  47. Joe Leydon says:

    I refuse to comment, other than to say that Paris Hilton and I are just good friends.

  48. Paris Hilton says:

    Joe Leydon, you said you loved me!

  49. Joe Leydon says:

    Er… You don’t have that on tape, do you?

  50. Shannen Doherty says:

    Paris, you aren’t taking anymore porn stars from me. Leydon is mine and he has the scars to prove it.

  51. Joe Leydon says:

    See, Dave was right: When you’re a paunchy, sad-eyed, clumsy oaf, beautiful women really will fight over you.
    Back to movies: I’ve been told that neither “Curse” nor “Man of the House” will be screened in advance for critics. Er, does that tell you something?

  52. Stella's Boy says:

    Hardly surprising. The production history behind Cursed is already infamous, and Man of the House looks like, well, it doesn’t look good. And both are critic-proof, so why bother? Is this happening more and more, or was it just as common, say, five or six years ago?

  53. Joe Leydon says:

    Actually, opening without press previews is a fairly common occurrence. I mean, it doesn’t happen every week, but I wouldn’t be surprised if it averaged out over the course of a year to once or twice (or more) a month. It seems to me that August and September are the worst months, even worse than January, because that’s when studios tend to dump the weakest product, and it’s not uncommon for two unpreviewed movies to open on the same weekend. (Early last fall, for example, “Paparazzi” and “The Cookout” opened on the same day without previews.) Whether it’s more common today than five or ten years ago, it’s tough to say. The thing is, with the advent of the Internet, no movie goes unreviewed for very long. You can see the first showing on a Friday, rush back to your office and crank out a review, and it can be posted on line by late Friday afternoon. (And if you’re in the right time zone, you can get it on line by mid-afternoon L.A. time.) Of course, sometimes a studio decides not to screen a movie that actually turns out to be pretty good. It’s rare, of course, but it happens. Way back in the ‘80s, for example, “The Terminator” opened in my market without press screenings.

  54. Stella's Boy says:

    “The thing is, with the advent of the Internet, no movie goes unreviewed for very long.”
    You got that right. Cursed was reviewed months ago on AICN.

  55. Joe Leydon says:

    And let me guess: It got flamed, right?

  56. Stella's Boy says:

    I think they were mixed. I believe one said that the R-rated version, while nothing exceptional, was OK and featured a few good scares to go along with the gore. The major problems were in the third act.

  57. Joe Leydon says:

    I wonder if this is becoming standard operational procedure for horror flicks: Release the PG-13 version in theaters, then, four or five months later, release the R version in video stores. There’s an article in today’s Variety pointing out that, in thse censorious times, exhibitors are becoming increasingly leery of R-rated product. Of course, the timing for this concern may be a bit off: R-rated “Constantine” apparently grossed more during its opening 4-day holiday weekend than any other R-rated flick has ever earned on a 4-day holiday weekend.

  58. Stella's Boy says:

    The PG-13 horror movie is definitely all the rage right now, and the box office numbers certainly speak volumes (with exceptions here and there). I wonder if Warner Bros./Dark Castle is at all tempted to release a PG-13 House of Wax, and whether or not certain remakes, like The Fog, will aim for a PG-13 rather than an R. I think The Amityville Horror remake is R at this point.

  59. Mark says:

    Tough to make an R rated flick nowadays. Keeping out 40% of your customers? Not good business.

  60. Lota says:

    Except youngsters don’t want to see rated PG-13, it’s more fun to get into an R movie. It doesn’t keep them out. I was going to R movies at 13 and 14 yrs old all the time.
    I also accompanied all my brothers and their friends when they wanted to go to an R movie and when neither of the parental units would take them. Crime and horror movies which are PG-13 aren’t “scary enough” to alot of younger people. at least this is their perception, and their desensitized minds from years of video/computer games.

  61. Stella's Boy says:

    I’ve never been into video games and only played John Madden when I had a video game system, but I enjoy an R-rated horror or crime movie from time to time. I know critics hate the genre, as do “serious” film fans, but horror movies are my guilty pleasure, even the bad ones(with some exceptions, of course). Some movies should be R.

  62. lota says:

    i wonder if many of the horror or crime or genre-benders in the thriller/horror or thriller/crime which would be rated “R” are so popular (especially in Europe), becasue the PG-13 level is considered too safe/dull by many younger people.
    Takashi Miike is very popular (at least in Europe & Asia which are big markets) partly because he is never boring and is always shocking/provocative in some way. Many of his movies aren’t available in the US yet but Canadians and americans seem to be buying pirate or region free DVD in large numbers. Battle Royale (Fukusaku’s last stand) was a huge pirated CD by young people.
    I don’t/didn’t play computer games at all but I definitely prefer “R” crime dramas/thrillers.

  63. bicycle bob says:

    its not that r rated movies are more fun to go to because u can’t get in. they’re usually better than pg movies. when ur 15 who wants to see a pg disney movie?

  64. TheBrotherhoodOfTheLostSkeletonOfCadavra says:

    HOUSE OF WAX got its rating last week–it’s a PG-13.

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This is probably going to sound petty, but Martin Scorsese insisting that critics see his film in theaters even though it’s going straight to Netflix and then not screening it in most American cities was a watershed moment for me in this theatrical versus streaming debate.

I completely respect when a filmmaker insists that their movie is meant to be seen in the theater, but the thing is, you got to actually make it possible to see it in the theater. Some movies may be too small for that, and that’s totally OK.

When your movie is largely financed by a streaming service and is going to appear on that streaming service instantly, I don’t really see the point of pretending that it’s a theatrical film. It just seems like we are needlessly indulging some kind of personal fantasy.

I don’t think that making a feature film length production that is going to go straight to a video platform is some sort of “step down.“ I really don’t. Theatrical exhibition as we know it is dying off anyway, for a variety of reasons.

I should clarify myself because this thread is already being misconstrued — I’m talking about how the movie is screened in advance. If it’s going straight to Netflix, why the ritual of demanding people see it in the theater?

There used to be a category that everyone recognized called “TV movie” or “made for television movie” and even though a lot of filmmakers considered that déclassé, it seems to me that probably 90% of feature films fit that description now.

Atlantis has mostly sunk into the ocean, only a few tower spires remain above the waterline, and I’m increasingly at peace with that, because it seems to be what the industry and much of the audience wants. We live in an age of convenience and information control.

Only a very elite group of filmmakers is still allowed to make movies “for theaters“ and actually have them seen and judged that way on a wide scale. Even platform releasing seems to be somewhat endangered. It can’t be fought. It has to be accepted.

9. Addendum: I’ve been informed that it wasn’t Scorsese who requested that the Bob Dylan documentary only be screened for critics in theaters, but a Netflix representative indicated the opposite to me, so I just don’t know what to believe.

It’s actually OK if your film is not eligible for an Oscar — we have a thing called the Emmys. A lot of this anxiety is just a holdover from the days when television was considered culturally inferior to theatrical feature films. Everybody needs to just get over it.

In another 10 to 20 years they’re probably going to merge the Emmys in the Oscars into one program anyway, maybe they’ll call it the Contentys.

“One of the fun things about seeing the new Quentin Tarantino film three months early in Cannes (did I mention this?) is that I know exactly why it’s going to make some people furious, and thus I have time to steel myself for the takes.

Back in July 2017, when it was revealed that Tarantino’s next project was connected to the Manson Family murders, it was condemned in some quarters as an insulting and exploitative stunt. We usually require at least a fig-leaf of compassion for the victims in true-crime adaptations, and even Tarantino partisans like myself – I don’t think he’s made a bad film yet – found ourselves wondering how he might square his more outré stylistic impulses with the depiction of a real mass murder in which five people and one unborn child lost their lives.

After all, it’s one thing to slice off with gusto a fictional policeman’s ear; it’s quite another to linger over the gory details of a massacre that took place within living memory, and which still carries a dread historical significance.

In her essay The White Album, Joan Didion wrote: “Many people I know in Los Angeles believe that the Sixties ended abruptly on August 9, 1969, ended at the exact moment when word of the murders on Cielo Drive traveled like brushfire through the community, and in a sense this is true.”

Early in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, as Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt’s characters drive up the hill towards Leo’s bachelor pad, the camera cranes up gently to reveal a street sign: Cielo Drive. Tarantino understands how charged that name is; he can hear the Molotov cocktails clinking as he shoulders the crate.

As you may have read in the reviews from Cannes, much of the film is taken up with following DiCaprio and Pitt’s characters – a fading TV actor and his long-serving stunt double – as they amusingly go about their lives in Los Angeles, while Margot Robbie’s Sharon Tate is a relatively minor presence. But the spectre of the murders is just over the horizon, and when the night of the 9th finally arrives, you feel the mood in the cinema shift.

No spoilers whatsoever about what transpires on screen. But in the audience, as it became clear how Tarantino was going to handle this extraordinarily loaded moment, the room soured and split, like a pan of cream left too long on the hob. I craned in, amazed, but felt the person beside me recoil in either dismay or disgust.

Two weeks on, I’m convinced that the scene is the boldest and most graphically violent of Tarantino’s career – I had to shield my eyes at one point, found myself involuntarily groaning “oh no” at another – and a dead cert for the most controversial. People will be outraged by it, and with good reason. But in a strange and brilliant way, it takes Didion’s death-of-the-Sixties observation and pushes it through a hellfire-hot catharsis.

Hollywood summoned up this horror, the film seems to be saying, and now it’s Hollywood’s turn to exorcise it. I can’t wait until the release in August, when we can finally talk about why.

~ Robbie Collin